Scott Challinor

Scott Challinor

Business Editor

Scott Challinor is a specialist in communications and works on the assembly of particular Parliamentary Review documents. He studied French and Spanish at Oxford University.


Scott Challinor's articles (366)

Rebecca Long-Bailey announces candidacy for Labour leadership

Rebecca Long-Bailey has formally announced her entry into the Labour leadership contest.

Sensio Lighting demonstrates how business and education can collaborate on future-proofing

As industry in the UK and worldwide continues to develop with advancements in the use of technology and artificial intelligence, businesses are left with no choice but to innovate in order to future-proof themselves, while education is also under pressure to stay in touch.

Conservative plans for R and D tax breaks could benefit firms like European Technology Development Ltd

December saw Boris Johnson declare a “new dawn” as the Conservatives secured the biggest majority in Westminster since the 1987 election. As a new decade begins, the UK’s Brexit path is looking clearer but also much emphasis will be on Johnson’s domestic policies, how these may be implemented and what it will mean for Britain’s SMEs.

Timetabling and regulations to be finalised for Labour leadership contest

Labour’s National Executive Committee will convene on Monday to set the timetable and rules for the party’s upcoming leadership contest, including who will be eligible to vote in it.

Costs of HS2 “out of control”, Lord Berkeley says in report

Deputy chairman of the government commissioned HS2 review panel, Lord Berkeley, has published an independent “dissenting report” saying there is “overwhelming evidence” that the costs of the project have spiralled “out of control”.

Mandate for Indyref2 under dispute with Section 30 Order unlikely under Johnson ministry

While December’s general election yielded a significant victory for Boris Johnson’s Conservatives, the outlook in Scotland could not have shown more of a contrast. The SNP increased its contingent of MPs in Westminster to 48, with the Tories losing more than half of their Scottish constituencies.

Government plans for free ports comes with pros and cons

Government plans were first announced back in August to launch up to ten free ports across the UK post-Brexit, which would allow firms to import and re-export goods outside of normal tax and customs rules. Now that the Conservatives have secured a majority, it could look to press on with introducing them.

Boris Johnson's education policy including £14 billion funds for schools likely to be one of his most scrutinised moves

After the Conservative ministries of David Cameron and Theresa May oversaw nine years of austerity measures, newly re-elected prime minister Boris Johnson has embarked on the challenge of reversing those public spending cuts, with one of his new spending pledges an additional £14 billion of extra funding for schools over three years.

Questions over Conservative pledge to provide “gigabit-capable” broadband to all by 2025

One of the pledges in the 2019 Conservative election manifesto was a repeat of a previous one – to kit out the whole UK with “gigabit-capable” broadband by the year 2025, and now with a majority in Boris Johnson’s hand, attentions turn to how this will be implemented.

Conservatives’ plans for green home upgrades must extend, according to experts

The Conservatives’ answer to Labour’s radical Green New Deal during the election campaign was to work toward a net-zero carbon target by 2050, and now Boris Johnson will seek to get the necessary work underway with his majority in hand.

Northern Powerhouse rail tops Tory transport priorities, but others likely to be addressed first

During the election campaign, Boris Johnson and the Conservative party prioritised a new rail link between Manchester and Leeds with regards to transport pledges. With a majority in parliament now secure, voters in the north of England within traditional Labour heartlands will now be eagerly awaiting the implementation of this promise.

More action needed in social care, but cross-party consensus is step in right direction

Newly elected prime minister Boris Johnson made a verbal pledge to solve the “crisis” facing adult social care on the steps of Downing Street back in August, and now with his majority in hand, attention will be turning to the manifesto promise that followed up on those words.

11-month timeframe to agree free-trade agreement with EU in 2020

After Boris Johnson successfully secured a Conservative majority in the national poll dubbed “the Brexit election” by Sky News, it is unsurprising that the prime minister will enact his manifesto pledge to get Brexit “done” by January 31, 2020.

Business still needs clarity on propsoed points-based immigration system and its implications

When it came to addressing immigration, the 2017 Conservative manifesto sought to reduce net migration to less than 100,000, a longstanding target which came under fire. In 2019, Boris Johnson abandoned this in favour of an Australian style points-based system, which would entice the “brightest and the best”.