FAQs

FAQs

What is The Parliamentary Review?
 
The Parliamentary Review is a series of fiercely independent publications. It reviews the latest events in parliament from a non-partisan perspective but it is wholly independent of government. 
 
It allows private and public sector organisations to share and promote their best practice within policy sectors, with the goal of raising standards. The organisations are also free to use the Review, and their article within it, to promote themselves to a wide audience. 
 
How does The Parliamentary Review function?
 
The publication is independently owned by Westminster Publications Ltd. This allows the publication to remain non-partisan, and as such grants the freedom to our representatives to praise and criticise government policy against the comparatively blank canvas of the document, which takes no official stance. 
 
Alongside these voices that represent different sectors, notable politicians and senior figures related to the relevant industry lend their perspective and insight to The Parliamentary Review. The result is a multifaceted and cohesive picture of the country.

How many representatives are in each document?
 
There are usually between 10 and 15 representatives in each document. This allows for significant and varied content, while not diluting any one representative’s contribution to the edition.

What is the readership?
 
Total readership of The Parliamentary Review has been upward of 500,000 per year, making it one of the most widely read and circulated series of publications of its kind. It is primarily aimed at directors, CEOs and those in positions of leadership. The publications are primarily distributed in hard copy, but there is a significant online presence.
 
How is The Parliamentary Review funded?
 
The Review is wholly funded by the representatives involved in each document. The 500,000+ recipients get their copies free of charge. The Review has never received government funding. 
 
Larger organisations tend to contribute more than smaller ones, and their publications and articles receive higher prominence and a greater readership as a result. This makes it possible for smaller organisations to participate and means that we can reflect the concerns of the whole country.  
 
Why is the cost not mentioned in the initial invitation?
 
We would never contemplate sending a letter to someone out of the blue that asked them for money. This would be wholly inappropriate. We feel, and we have been vindicated on this, that the best way to explain exactly what the Review is and how it works is to ask potential representatives to phone us so that we can explain everything to them. In every single one of these five-minute phone calls, we explain that there is a cost and that we are a private organisation, completely independent from parliament. We are proud of the fact that we are independent and that the only interests we represent are those of the SMEs who take part in the Review. 
 
To explain the cost in a letter, we would have to explain everything else about the Review, which would mean our letters would run to several pages. It makes much more sense to explain the nature of the whole project over the phone. 

Why is it called ‘The Parliamentary Review’?
 
The name 'The Parliamentary Review' reflects the fact that our publications review parliament, that the representatives reflect on how parliament has affected their organisation, and the fact that senior politicians write for the Review each year. 
 
Is this an award?

The Parliamentary Review is not an award or an accreditation. It is a vehicle for different organisations to share their best practice as well as their concerns. The organisations that take part choose to present themselves as a learning tool and a template for reform. They are free to promote the fact that they are doing so but are not permitted to claim that it is an award or accreditation. 

What is The Parliamentary Review Gala?
 
To celebrate the release of The Parliamentary Review, a gala evening is held in the House of Commons as a thank you to all our representatives, where we have had notable speakers from the world of politics, media and sport in recent years.