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News | Published August 31 2019

Cabinet Review: Nicky Morgan

Following the recent appointment of Boris Johnson's cabinet, we have launched a series of articles to assess how each sector views their new Secretary of State. Our fifth instalment focuses on Nicky Morgan, the new Minister of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

To gauge the opinion of the sector, we spoke to Russ Lidstone, CEO of the Creative Engagement Group and Donna Copley, Financial Director of Piperdam Golf & Leisure Resort.

1. Do you think that Nicky Morgan is a good choice for Minister of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport?

Russ Lidstone: I believe that, as Morgan becomes the eighth culture secretary in nine years, this devalues the role. Our industries require greater consistency in representation. She has good ministerial experience, economic expertise and background in education which could be of significant benefit. Ideally, she wouldn't just see this as stepping stone.

She has good ministerial experience, economic expertise and background in education which could be of significant benefit. Ideally, she wouldn't just see this as steppingstone.

Donna Copley: I don't think there is anything in her history that really qualifies her to be in this particular role.

2. Do you think the department has done a good job in recent years?

Donna Copley: Getting the 2012 Olympics was a fantastic achievement, however, we had an accommodation business in the area that was not allowed advertise, because we were not on the list and were too small a concern to get on it.

Getting the 2012 Olympics was a fantastic achievement, however, we had an accommodation business in the area that was not allowed advertise, because we were not on the list and were too small a concern to get on it.

We attended a few of the events and it was clear that certain suppliers, who do not have an affinity with health and sport, had complete control over the F&B offering.

Leaving the venues for an alternative was not allowed. So the success of getting that event was somewhat tainted both as a business and a customer.

We had a very similar experience with the Tour de France though I am not certain what role this department played in securing that.

In terms of the media and the internet, these areas seem to be disintegrating into a base offering of reality TV and social media that exposes people to the lowest common denominator and an obsession over image.

Russ Lidstone: From my industry's perspective, there is still not enough recognition of the economic role and broader meaning of the “creative industries”.

Creative industries generate over £100 billion of value to the UK economy, which is largely considered to be best in the world and provides one in 11 jobs. It and the service sector generally overshadowed by smaller industries in the debate regarding economic impact of Brexit

Under Ed Vaizey as Minister for Culture, Media and Sport the creative industries prospered and he was well liked as someone who recognised the value of the industry.

3. What areas would you like Nicky Morgan to focus on in her new role?

Russ Lidstone: I want her to voice concerns of leaders like myself who see the impact that a no-deal Brexit would have on the sector.

With the new cabinet's preparations for no deal, I worry we may see a resurgence of budget cuts in art and culture and a lack of focus on value creating industries. I'd expect her to stress the extreme damage that would be caused by a no-deal Brexit – free movement of goods, services, capital and people have underpinned the sector's success. She should represent this view rather than facilitate crash out of the EU.

I'd like her to promote growth of the creative and digital industries outside of and alongside London. Our business has strong footholds in Plymouth, Manchester as well as London and we can see the benefit of tapping into talent pools outside of the London bubble.

I'd like her to promote growth of the creative and digital industries outside of and alongside London. Our business has strong footholds in Plymouth, Manchester as well as London and we can see the benefit of tapping into talent pools outside of the London bubble.

As someone whose business straddles MICE – Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, Events, in addition to the digital and creative industries, I'd like her to recognise the relationship between MICE industry and creative industries and that both require a strong corporate client base to work for.

As chair of Creative Mentor Network, I'd like her to encourage young people from low income and diverse backgrounds to see the arts and creative industries as a valuable and enriching career.

As former non-exec director of Basketball England I'd like to see greater support for sport participation, especially amongst the young - given the strong evidence of broader cultural, social and health benefits. Not enough is being done to get more people active, despite some terrific work by Sport England and initiatives like 'this girl can'.

Donna Copley: There is a massive opportunity, in this role, to address a lot of issues that young people are facing in society, by promoting sport and supporting the arts. These need to be taken back to schools and made accessible to everyone, but also with joined up thinking around the periphery to support local businesses and healthy options.


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Authored by

Alice Jaspars
Culture Editor
@
August 31 2019

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