Archaeology Wales

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Archaeology Wales's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Archaeology Wales is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.arch-wales.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | ARCHAEOLOGY WALES
Managing Director
MarkHouliston
Archaeology Wales and Archaeology
England record and survey standing and
buried archaeological remains
Staff at Archaeology Wales and its sister company, Archaeology
England, are committed to delivering the highest-quality
advice to clients, supported by a full range of bespoke
archaeological services comprising desk-based assessments,
surveys and fieldwork investigations. Given the area it covers and
the wide range of different planning authorities it works with,
the company faces challenges in ensuring the planning expertise
of its consultants and managers is up to date and relevant for
use. By developing the skills necessary to meet these challenges,
however, opportunities have been created, because clients
such as construction companies are always in need of expert
subcontractors to whom they can outsource their specialist
requirements. Managing Director Mark Houliston explains how
its customer-focused approach has helped it thrive against the
backdrop of an ever-changing regulatory environment.
Since Archaeology Wales was founded in 2010, we have carried out projects in
every local authority and national park in Wales and at least half of those in England.
We have also undertaken work for Cadw, Historic England, the Welsh government
and Highways England. We have established offices in Caerphilly, Swansea,
Llanidloes, Conwy and Manchester, each headed by a senior archaeologist, and we
have recently taken on a new project manager with a view to providing services
to clients in southwest England. In addition, we’ve moved our Caerphilly office to
a new, enlarged facility on the Treforest Industrial Estate, which is equipped with
finds and environmental processing areas as well as increased office space.
FACTS ABOUT
ARCHAEOLOGY WALES
»Managing Director:
MarkHouliston
»Finance and Personnel
Director: Jill Houliston
»Established in 2010
»Based in Llanidloes, with
offices in Caerphilly, Swansea,
Conwy and Manchester
»Services: Consultancy,
desk-based assessments,
non-intrusive surveys,
fieldwork and programmes of
community engagement
»No. of employees : 45
»Turnover: £1.2 million
Archaeology Wales
23ARCHAEOLOGY WALES |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Our company currently has about
45 employees working on projects
of all sizes, ranging from national
infrastructure schemes and
construction projects, to small one-
off developments and programmes
of community engagement. Our staff
have successfully undertaken hundreds
of desk-based studies; non-intrusive
investigations, such as geophysical
surveys and building recording;
and site work, such as evaluation
trenching, watching-brief monitoring
and excavation. We can deploy self-
contained teams of up to 30 staff
headed by experienced project officers.
The standards of our company are high,
and all the work we do is undertaken in
accordance with the guidelines of the
Chartered Institute for Archaeologists,
Cadw and Historic England. Archaeology
Wales is a Registered Organisation
with CIfA, a member of the Federation
of Archaeological Managers and
Employers, and Constructionline Gold
and Acclaim registered.
We are proud of the quality of our staff
development programme, and we are
pleased to be recognised as a CIfA-
approved training and CPD provider. All
our field staff receive extensive training
in health, safety and environmental
management, and they all have CSCS
cards. The success of our company is
due to an embedded commitment by
all our staff to deliver the best advice
and services they can. Our expectation
is that this is evident not just in
the skills that enable our planning
specialists to deliver customised
consultancy services, but also in the
reputation we’ve gained for the quality
and objectivity of our desk-based, non-
intrusive and fieldworkinvestigations.
Customised consultancy
services
For those who argue that at its best
the planning system should help
prevent problems and not cause them,
it is necessary to look no further than
archaeology for instances of good
practice in action. Our staff aim to
prevent potential delays and costs by
engaging with planning officials, such
as the archaeological officers assigned
to local planning authorities, as soon
as possible. Planning archaeologists
regularly prioritise measures that aim to
protect buried remains, avoiding more
expensive options such as excavation,
and so with mitigation measures such
as these often a matter of common
interest, it makes sense for potential
developers to appoint an archaeological
consultant early in the planning
process. No one’s interests are served
by circumstances in which important
archaeological remains start to appear
after groundworks havebegun.
Our two companies, Archaeology
Wales and Archaeology England,
are examples of a relatively small
number of professional archaeological
organisations working across the UK
that can offer independent advice
on all matters archaeological. These
range from pre-ownership guidance
right through to issues relating to the
signing-off of planning conditions such
as reporting and museum archiving.
We are convinced that the success of
our company is largely driven by our
pledge to help all those who contact
Archaeology Wales and
Archaeology England
excavation teams have
worked collaboratively
on several large
infrastructure projects
The standards
of our
company are
high
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | ARCHAEOLOGY WALES
Managing Director
MarkHouliston
Archaeology Wales and Archaeology
England record and survey standing and
buried archaeological remains
Staff at Archaeology Wales and its sister company, Archaeology
England, are committed to delivering the highest-quality
advice to clients, supported by a full range of bespoke
archaeological services comprising desk-based assessments,
surveys and fieldwork investigations. Given the area it covers and
the wide range of different planning authorities it works with,
the company faces challenges in ensuring the planning expertise
of its consultants and managers is up to date and relevant for
use. By developing the skills necessary to meet these challenges,
however, opportunities have been created, because clients
such as construction companies are always in need of expert
subcontractors to whom they can outsource their specialist
requirements. Managing Director Mark Houliston explains how
its customer-focused approach has helped it thrive against the
backdrop of an ever-changing regulatory environment.
Since Archaeology Wales was founded in 2010, we have carried out projects in
every local authority and national park in Wales and at least half of those in England.
We have also undertaken work for Cadw, Historic England, the Welsh government
and Highways England. We have established offices in Caerphilly, Swansea,
Llanidloes, Conwy and Manchester, each headed by a senior archaeologist, and we
have recently taken on a new project manager with a view to providing services
to clients in southwest England. In addition, we’ve moved our Caerphilly office to
a new, enlarged facility on the Treforest Industrial Estate, which is equipped with
finds and environmental processing areas as well as increased office space.
FACTS ABOUT
ARCHAEOLOGY WALES
»Managing Director:
MarkHouliston
»Finance and Personnel
Director: Jill Houliston
»Established in 2010
»Based in Llanidloes, with
offices in Caerphilly, Swansea,
Conwy and Manchester
»Services: Consultancy,
desk-based assessments,
non-intrusive surveys,
fieldwork and programmes of
community engagement
»No. of employees : 45
»Turnover: £1.2 million
Archaeology Wales
23ARCHAEOLOGY WALES |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Our company currently has about
45 employees working on projects
of all sizes, ranging from national
infrastructure schemes and
construction projects, to small one-
off developments and programmes
of community engagement. Our staff
have successfully undertaken hundreds
of desk-based studies; non-intrusive
investigations, such as geophysical
surveys and building recording;
and site work, such as evaluation
trenching, watching-brief monitoring
and excavation. We can deploy self-
contained teams of up to 30 staff
headed by experienced project officers.
The standards of our company are high,
and all the work we do is undertaken in
accordance with the guidelines of the
Chartered Institute for Archaeologists,
Cadw and Historic England. Archaeology
Wales is a Registered Organisation
with CIfA, a member of the Federation
of Archaeological Managers and
Employers, and Constructionline Gold
and Acclaim registered.
We are proud of the quality of our staff
development programme, and we are
pleased to be recognised as a CIfA-
approved training and CPD provider. All
our field staff receive extensive training
in health, safety and environmental
management, and they all have CSCS
cards. The success of our company is
due to an embedded commitment by
all our staff to deliver the best advice
and services they can. Our expectation
is that this is evident not just in
the skills that enable our planning
specialists to deliver customised
consultancy services, but also in the
reputation we’ve gained for the quality
and objectivity of our desk-based, non-
intrusive and fieldworkinvestigations.
Customised consultancy
services
For those who argue that at its best
the planning system should help
prevent problems and not cause them,
it is necessary to look no further than
archaeology for instances of good
practice in action. Our staff aim to
prevent potential delays and costs by
engaging with planning officials, such
as the archaeological officers assigned
to local planning authorities, as soon
as possible. Planning archaeologists
regularly prioritise measures that aim to
protect buried remains, avoiding more
expensive options such as excavation,
and so with mitigation measures such
as these often a matter of common
interest, it makes sense for potential
developers to appoint an archaeological
consultant early in the planning
process. No one’s interests are served
by circumstances in which important
archaeological remains start to appear
after groundworks havebegun.
Our two companies, Archaeology
Wales and Archaeology England,
are examples of a relatively small
number of professional archaeological
organisations working across the UK
that can offer independent advice
on all matters archaeological. These
range from pre-ownership guidance
right through to issues relating to the
signing-off of planning conditions such
as reporting and museum archiving.
We are convinced that the success of
our company is largely driven by our
pledge to help all those who contact
Archaeology Wales and
Archaeology England
excavation teams have
worked collaboratively
on several large
infrastructure projects
The standards
of our
company are
high
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
24 | ARCHAEOLOGY WALES
us to understand, assess and ultimately
manage the potential archaeological
risks associated with any scheme they
are working on.
A reputation for quality and
objectivity
Whether delivering consultancy advice
or frontline archaeological services, all
our staff are committed to quality and
objectivity. Our consultants can advise
on a wide range of projects, for example
those involving potential alterations to
listed buildings or monuments or those
involving issues such as visual impact.
Assessments of a more specialist nature
include ASIDOHL2 studies, settings
assessments, conservation management
plans, conditions surveys and targeted
documentary research. We are used to
assessing the nature and significance of
below and above-ground remains, and
we are always happy to negotiate with
planning authorities on a client’s behalf.
Our advice is practical, and our specialist
reports have a well-earned reputation
for quality, thoroughness andobjectivity.
Our field teams are able to provide a full
range of high-quality bespoke fieldwork
services, ranging from schemes where
all archaeological remains are removed
before the start of groundworks, to
targeted strategies where watching-
brief archaeologists work alongside
construction workers. Specialist,
non-intrusive investigative techniques
undertaken by our field archaeologists
include geophysical surveys, field-
walking, GPS surveys, metal-detector
surveys and topographical surveys.
Evaluation methodologies of this type
are often requested by local authority
archaeologists at an early stage in the
pre-planning process, and they can
form a valuable tool in the preparation
of strategies to mitigate the impact of
a proposed development on the buried
archaeological resource.
We also offer services designed to
survey and record standing buildings
and other structures, either as part
of the pre-planning requirements
associated with a development or as
a condition of planning. Whatever
type of archaeological investigation
is required, Archaeology Wales
and Archaeology England have the
necessary expertise to undertake the
work and produce a high-quality
technical report on the results.
All our staff
are committed
to quality and
objectivity
Archaeology Wales and
Archaeology England
supports a team of
finds and environmental
specialists
25THE ROYAL DOCKS MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY LTD |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Managing Director ScottDerben
Crane barges in KGV dock supporting
the airport expansion project
London’s Royal Docks are composed of three docks: Royal
Victoria Dock, Royal Albert Dock and King George V Dock
and were officially opened as a collective in 1921. Originally
designed to accommodate iron-clad steamships, the docks are
now used for a number of purposes, ranging from recreational
activities to floating hotels. As a designated enterprise zone,
the Royal Docks area has received significant investment, which
will serve to improve transport links and promote the hosting of
world-class events. RoDMA’s Managing Director Scott Derben
explains the history of the area and how they have worked to
preserve the ageinginfrastructure.
We are a not-for-profit organisation and have a 225-year management lease
over the water and a small number of land parcels. Our principal objectives are to
manage the operations, maintain the infrastructure and support the regeneration
of the docks.
Financially, a service charge is levied to occupiers around the docks. In addition, we
raise revenue through a range of services, and our income is split equally between
these two income sources. Once overheads and costs are deducted, the balance
is placed in a sinking fund from which all major assets are funded. The cost to
refurbish the major assets runs into many millions of pounds and far exceeds the
surplus that has been created in recent years. Therefore, the refurbishment of
major assets is planned on a rolling ten-year basis, to allow sufficient build-up of
funds to take on priority projects.
FACTS ABOUT
THE ROYAL DOCKS
MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY LTD
»Managing Director:
ScottDerben
»Established in 1989
»Based in east London
»Services: Maintenance,
operation management and
regeneration support
»No. of employees: 16
»Turnover: £2.1 million
»Water area of 250 acres
»www.londonsroyaldocks.com
The Royal Docks Management
Authority Ltd

www.arch-wales.co.uk

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster