Archibald McCorquodale & Son

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Archibald McCorquodale & Son's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Archibald McCorquodale & Son is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.mccorquodaleltd.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
14 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
Tottenham Hotspur’s
stadium, New White
Hart Lane, has finally
opened after a host
of problems during
construction
The long-awaited Tottenham Hotspur
Stadium opened in April after a seven-
month delay.
One of the most hotly watched
construction projects of the year, the
62,062-seat stadium was due to open
in September 2018 but suffered a
number of setbacks during its build.
Many of the issues stemmed from
problems with the stadium’s safety
systems, which were first reported in
August 2018.
This prompted the club to have
“urgent meetings” with construction
manager Mace, which was the leading
contractor on the works, to review
the programme, rectify and re-test
thestadium.
In September, the following month,
Chairman Daniel Levy said the delay
had resulted in “substantial additional
costs, not least of which the need for
alternative venue hire, along with the
inconvenience for our fans and those of
our opposition.”
Updates were given again in October.
The club said it had been working
with key contractors involved in the
mechanical, electrical and safety
systems before revealing that there
would be further delays to the opening
of the stadium with a new date set
forDecember.
Frustrations, however, continued into
the new year, with the club pushing
back the opening again, including a
Premier League match against their
biggest rivals Arsenal in March, which
was played at Wembley.
The opening finally took place the
following month on April 3, with a no-
expense-spared ceremony, as well as
their first game in the stadium against
Crystal Palace.
Aside from its plush grounds, the new
stadium boasts Europe’s largest football
club shop, a 180-bed hotel and 579
apartments in four blocks for which the
club has planning permission.
It will also play host to other sports,
with a sunken artificial surface
that can be removed for American
footballgames.
Originally estimated to cost £400
million, the final cost for the new
stadium rocketed to £850 million –
slightly more expensive than the £789
million spent on constructing Wembley.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to
print, the Premier League has kicked
off, and Tottenham have had an
application to increase the capacity of
their stadi um approved.
Spurs stadium opens (at last)
15ARCHIBALD MCCORQUODALE & SON |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Tottenham Hotspur’s
stadium, New White
Hart Lane, has finally
opened after a host
of problems during
construction
The long-awaited Tottenham Hotspur
Stadium opened in April after a seven-
month delay.
One of the most hotly watched
construction projects of the year, the
62,062-seat stadium was due to open
in September 2018 but suffered a
number of setbacks during its build.
Many of the issues stemmed from
problems with the stadium’s safety
systems, which were first reported in
August 2018.
This prompted the club to have
“urgent meetings” with construction
manager Mace, which was the leading
contractor on the works, to review
the programme, rectify and re-test
thestadium.
In September, the following month,
Chairman Daniel Levy said the delay
had resulted in “substantial additional
costs, not least of which the need for
alternative venue hire, along with the
inconvenience for our fans and those of
our opposition.”
Updates were given again in October.
The club said it had been working
with key contractors involved in the
mechanical, electrical and safety
systems before revealing that there
would be further delays to the opening
of the stadium with a new date set
forDecember.
Frustrations, however, continued into
the new year, with the club pushing
back the opening again, including a
Premier League match against their
biggest rivals Arsenal in March, which
was played at Wembley.
The opening finally took place the
following month on April 3, with a no-
expense-spared ceremony, as well as
their first game in the stadium against
Crystal Palace.
Aside from its plush grounds, the new
stadium boasts Europe’s largest football
club shop, a 180-bed hotel and 579
apartments in four blocks for which the
club has planning permission.
It will also play host to other sports,
with a sunken artificial surface
that can be removed for American
footballgames.
Originally estimated to cost £400
million, the final cost for the new
stadium rocketed to £850 million –
slightly more expensive than the £789
million spent on constructing Wembley.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to
print, the Premier League has kicked
off, and Tottenham have had an
application to increase the capacity of
their stadi um approved.
Spurs stadium opens (at last)
Gavin McCorquodale (left) and
Colin McCorquodale (right)
New-build project in the West End of Glasgow. We
undertook all roofing work and this project won the Roof
Slating Category in the NFRC Scottish Awards of 2014
Founded in 1911, Archibald McCorquodale & Son Limited is
a Glasgow-based roofing and building contracting company
owned and managed by the great-grandsons of the founder.
Between them, Colin McCorquodale, a chartered building
surveyor, and his brother, Gavin, a time-served roof slater, offer
a wide range of skills to ensure the company’s many and varied
customers receive a high-quality service. In its hundred-plus-year
history, the company has seen many changes, although it remains
committed to the traditional roofing work on which the company
was founded – something Colin and Gavin explain in greater detail.
Working predominantly in and around Glasgow, we act either as a sole contractor on
traditional and modern roofing projects or as principal contractor on all trade contracts.
We undertake work in the repair, maintenance, alteration and refurbishment sectors
within domestic, commercial and industrial segments. The client base ranges from
domestic householders to large companies, with contracts ranging in value from
minor repairs costing less than £100 to projects up to a value of £600,000.
Within the industrial and commercial markets, we frequently undertake dilapidation
works, fabric repair schemes, internal alterations and upgrading projects. The
range of properties we work on within these sectors includes industrial units,
offices, retail premises, theatres, music venues and historic properties. Our 21 site-
based operatives include roof slaters and tilers, lead workers, plumbers, joiners,
roof sheeters and cladders, and general labourers. Within this number are five
apprentices, including two adultapprentices.
As a small family-owned company, we are somewhat unusual among our competitors
in that we operate across a number of sectors and undertake a wide variety of work
FACTS ABOUT
ARCHIBALD MCCORQUODALE
& SON
»Joint Managing Directors:
Colin McCorquodale and
Gavin McCorquodale
»Founded in 1911
»Located in Glasgow
»Services: Roofing and building
contractors
»No. of employees: 26
»Fourth generation family-
owned and managed
company
Archibald
McCorquodale & Son
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | ARCHIBALD MCCORQUODALE & SON
using a number of trades, many of
which we carry in-house. Those which
we don’t carry, we subcontract to
long-standing specialist subcontractors.
This gives us a unique selling point.
Training
It is important, particularly in terms of
traditional skills such as roof slating,
that in these times of skills shortages
we invest in training our own labour.
Knowing this, we’ve achieved an
apprentice head count which is the
highest it’s ever been, in both total and
percentage terms. We have a number
of long-serving staff members who
are testament to our investment in
our staff, some of whom joined the
company from school and have been
with us for over 30 years.
Training for all staff is crucial, and we
invest significant time and energy in
achieving this. Recently, we have been
successful in obtaining CITB funding to
allow this training to continue. Regular
training is undertaken for staff across all
disciplines in many aspects of their trade
as well as on health and safetymatters.
Award-winning
We regularly enter projects for industry
awards and have previously won the
Roof Slating and Heritage Roofing
categories of the National Federation
of Roofing Contractors’ Scottish
awards for projects at Kensington Gate
Lane, Glasgow, and the Pipe Factory,
Glasgow. We have been shortlisted
as finalists in the Roof Slating and
Heritage Roofing categories at the
National Roofing Awards. We’ve also
been awarded the NFRC Gold Health
& Safety award for the last five years.
All of these testify to the high skill
levels required within our industry
and demonstrate our commitment to
meeting thesestandards.
The company is one of only eight in
Scotland listed on the NFRC Heritage
Register. This highlights our competence
in undertaking works on heritage
properties, which we do regularly and
successfully. While heritage works
may conjure up pictures of castles
and other historic buildings, the vast
majority of them take place on pre-
1919 properties such as tenement
buildings, which require highly skilled
maintenance. Occasionally, however,
we do work on some unusual
properties, includingcastles.
Trade association involvement
As members of the NFRC, we’re active in
a number of their national committees,
covering such topics as roof slating
and tiling, heritage, and health and
safety. This involvement allows us to
contribute positively to our industry
and to understand – and deal with –
current issues more readily. Historically,
we’ve placed great emphasis on trade
association involvement, with every
generation of the company being
involved at high levels in a number of
tradeassociations.
Industry image
While often maligned, our industry is
striving to positively change its image,
and we are endeavouring to play our
part in this change. In conjunction
with the NFRC, our staff have delivered
CPD seminars to a number of industry
Completed reslating
project for student
accommodation in
Glasgow city centre
The company
is one of only
eight in
Scotland listed
on the NFRC
Heritage
Register
17ARCHIBALD MCCORQUODALE & SON |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
stakeholders, particularly on the topic
of roof slating defects. Our apprentices
and senior tradesmen have participated
in outreach events such as traditional
building skills demonstrations, where
they’ve helped demonstrate roof slating
to a wide audience, including MSPs,
schoolchildren, industry stakeholders
and the public. Events like these help
greatly in raising the image of our
industry and highlighting the skill
levelinvolved. NFRC is at the forefront
of professionalising our industry and
are developing an accreditation scheme
to cover all the disciplines of roofing in
which its members participate.
Market challenges
Roofing faces a number of challenges,
and the current political uncertainty
does not help. Market conditions
are extremely challenging, perhaps
more so in Scotland than in the rest
of the UK. Projects are often won or
lost by very small amounts, and the
competition to tender for work appears
to be increasing every year – conditions
that show no sign of changing in the
near future.
Another challenge is the ever-changing
face of pre-qualification questionnaire
requirements. While we are accredited
by Constructionline, CHAS and
SafeContractor, there is a frustration
when a client requires a different
vetting procedure, which often comes
at a cost to us. The industry should be
moving towards a single PQQ system or
at least wider recognition of the more
commonly used systems. There is a
feeling that many of the PQQ companies
simply put hurdles in the way of already
overstretched small companies such as
our own that have already demonstrated
compliance by achieving accreditation
via a recognised scheme. Retention is
another outdated model. Too often, this
can serve as an unwelcome discount.
The guarantees now provided within
construction eliminate the need for
retention. No other industry operates
Our apprentices
and senior
tradesmen have
participated in
outreach events
such as
traditional
building skills
demonstrations
A turret slated in Scots
slate on an ongoing
tenemental reroofing
project in Glasgow
14th-century castle reroofed
using Scots slates, Johnstone
this way. Industry bodies are working to
remove the need for retentions, which
would be a welcome change to the
way out industry operates.
Health and safety legislation in our
industry is, correctly, onerous and
heavily regulated. However, there is
frustration, particularly when working
in the domestic sector when we
compete against and lose work to
companies who do not take the correct
or, indeed, even basic health and safety
precautions. This is especially evident
in the frequent lack of adequate access
equipment we see, which jeopardises
the safety of the operatives. There
should be more awareness of the
need to use contractors who work
in compliance with health and safety
legislation, especially within the
domestic sector for homeowners who
more often select contractors solely on
price without much knowledge of what
is required to undertake works safely.
Looking to the future, we’re confident
we can build on our impressive 108-
year history by continuing to adapt to
meet the demands of an ever-changing
marketplace. Conditions are, however,
set to remain challenging, and there
are a number of issues to be addressed.
This makes our industry ever changing
and it is an industry that requires our
company to constantly evolve in order
to continue to operate successfully.
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | ARCHIBALD MCCORQUODALE & SON
using a number of trades, many of
which we carry in-house. Those which
we don’t carry, we subcontract to
long-standing specialist subcontractors.
This gives us a unique selling point.
Training
It is important, particularly in terms of
traditional skills such as roof slating,
that in these times of skills shortages
we invest in training our own labour.
Knowing this, we’ve achieved an
apprentice head count which is the
highest it’s ever been, in both total and
percentage terms. We have a number
of long-serving staff members who
are testament to our investment in
our staff, some of whom joined the
company from school and have been
with us for over 30 years.
Training for all staff is crucial, and we
invest significant time and energy in
achieving this. Recently, we have been
successful in obtaining CITB funding to
allow this training to continue. Regular
training is undertaken for staff across all
disciplines in many aspects of their trade
as well as on health and safetymatters.
Award-winning
We regularly enter projects for industry
awards and have previously won the
Roof Slating and Heritage Roofing
categories of the National Federation
of Roofing Contractors’ Scottish
awards for projects at Kensington Gate
Lane, Glasgow, and the Pipe Factory,
Glasgow. We have been shortlisted
as finalists in the Roof Slating and
Heritage Roofing categories at the
National Roofing Awards. We’ve also
been awarded the NFRC Gold Health
& Safety award for the last five years.
All of these testify to the high skill
levels required within our industry
and demonstrate our commitment to
meeting thesestandards.
The company is one of only eight in
Scotland listed on the NFRC Heritage
Register. This highlights our competence
in undertaking works on heritage
properties, which we do regularly and
successfully. While heritage works
may conjure up pictures of castles
and other historic buildings, the vast
majority of them take place on pre-
1919 properties such as tenement
buildings, which require highly skilled
maintenance. Occasionally, however,
we do work on some unusual
properties, includingcastles.
Trade association involvement
As members of the NFRC, we’re active in
a number of their national committees,
covering such topics as roof slating
and tiling, heritage, and health and
safety. This involvement allows us to
contribute positively to our industry
and to understand – and deal with –
current issues more readily. Historically,
we’ve placed great emphasis on trade
association involvement, with every
generation of the company being
involved at high levels in a number of
tradeassociations.
Industry image
While often maligned, our industry is
striving to positively change its image,
and we are endeavouring to play our
part in this change. In conjunction
with the NFRC, our staff have delivered
CPD seminars to a number of industry
Completed reslating
project for student
accommodation in
Glasgow city centre
The company
is one of only
eight in
Scotland listed
on the NFRC
Heritage
Register
17ARCHIBALD MCCORQUODALE & SON |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
stakeholders, particularly on the topic
of roof slating defects. Our apprentices
and senior tradesmen have participated
in outreach events such as traditional
building skills demonstrations, where
they’ve helped demonstrate roof slating
to a wide audience, including MSPs,
schoolchildren, industry stakeholders
and the public. Events like these help
greatly in raising the image of our
industry and highlighting the skill
levelinvolved. NFRC is at the forefront
of professionalising our industry and
are developing an accreditation scheme
to cover all the disciplines of roofing in
which its members participate.
Market challenges
Roofing faces a number of challenges,
and the current political uncertainty
does not help. Market conditions
are extremely challenging, perhaps
more so in Scotland than in the rest
of the UK. Projects are often won or
lost by very small amounts, and the
competition to tender for work appears
to be increasing every year – conditions
that show no sign of changing in the
near future.
Another challenge is the ever-changing
face of pre-qualification questionnaire
requirements. While we are accredited
by Constructionline, CHAS and
SafeContractor, there is a frustration
when a client requires a different
vetting procedure, which often comes
at a cost to us. The industry should be
moving towards a single PQQ system or
at least wider recognition of the more
commonly used systems. There is a
feeling that many of the PQQ companies
simply put hurdles in the way of already
overstretched small companies such as
our own that have already demonstrated
compliance by achieving accreditation
via a recognised scheme. Retention is
another outdated model. Too often, this
can serve as an unwelcome discount.
The guarantees now provided within
construction eliminate the need for
retention. No other industry operates
Our apprentices
and senior
tradesmen have
participated in
outreach events
such as
traditional
building skills
demonstrations
A turret slated in Scots
slate on an ongoing
tenemental reroofing
project in Glasgow
14th-century castle reroofed
using Scots slates, Johnstone
this way. Industry bodies are working to
remove the need for retentions, which
would be a welcome change to the
way out industry operates.
Health and safety legislation in our
industry is, correctly, onerous and
heavily regulated. However, there is
frustration, particularly when working
in the domestic sector when we
compete against and lose work to
companies who do not take the correct
or, indeed, even basic health and safety
precautions. This is especially evident
in the frequent lack of adequate access
equipment we see, which jeopardises
the safety of the operatives. There
should be more awareness of the
need to use contractors who work
in compliance with health and safety
legislation, especially within the
domestic sector for homeowners who
more often select contractors solely on
price without much knowledge of what
is required to undertake works safely.
Looking to the future, we’re confident
we can build on our impressive 108-
year history by continuing to adapt to
meet the demands of an ever-changing
marketplace. Conditions are, however,
set to remain challenging, and there
are a number of issues to be addressed.
This makes our industry ever changing
and it is an industry that requires our
company to constantly evolve in order
to continue to operate successfully.

www.mccorquodaleltd.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Archibald McCorquodale & Son. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster