Avery Healthcare

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Avery Healthcare's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Avery Healthcare is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.averyhealthcare.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
15AVERY HEALTHCARE |
CARE
Commercial Director MarkDanis
Avonmere Care, Bristol
Premium care provider Avery Healthcare was founded
in 2006 by John Stowbridge and Ian Matthews – who
between them have more than 50 years’ experience
in the sector. Avery operates a portfolio of 60 luxury care
homes across the country, delivering residential, dementia and
specialist nursing services to the senior living sector. Commercial
Director Mark Danis tells
The Parliamentary Review
how Avery
considers every factor that contributes to a successful retirement
living and care experience; from high-quality service to premium
facilities, he says Avery provides it all.
Now we are defined by the sector as a larger provider, our 60 locations provide
a representative sample in England of the demands that operators face and the
decisions they have had to make to maintain viability and quality.
Founded in 2006 and headquartered in Northampton, we have grown steadily
through the acquisition of failing services as well as organically through developing
our own new facilities. We have invested heavily in older services from two group
acquisitions to improve the stock of care services and ensure we deliver 21st-
century standards for local communities. We now employ over 4,000 staff, look
after 3,500 elderly and dependent residents and have an annual turnover in excess
of £170 million. All of our services are registered for residential and dementia care,
with just under half additionally registered for nursing care.
REPORT CARD
AVERY HEALTHCARE
»Commercial Director:
MarkDanis
»Established in 2006
»Based in Northampton
»Services: Residential, dementia
and nursing care
»No. of employees: Over 4,000
Avery Healthcare
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | AVERY HEALTHCARE
The importance of feedback
We operate staff surveys as well as
resident surveys to ensure that we are
listening to, and learning from, both
groups at all times. Being responsive
and supportive is embedded into our
stated values, along with care for all,
honesty, credibility and innovation. We
endeavour to recognise individuality
and treat everyone with respect,
make life meaningful, do the right
thing and build trust, lead in quality
and continually improve and enable
everyone to achieve their potential.
In common with other care operators,
adaptability and resilience have been
required to maintain progress as the
provision of care becomes ever more
complex. That complexity is found in
the needs of the residents, generally
now with multiple conditions to
support, plus the demands for non-
care services, akin to hotels, as more
of the senior generation have the
wherewithal to purchase preferred
service levels. We have chosen to
position our offering towards the
premium end of the market, attracting
more self-funded residents, to facilitate
the business model that can meet that
demand for quality in lifestyle as well
as quality in care.
Just over 70 per cent of our residents
are privately financed, with the rest
funded by local authorities and
some with a lifestyle supplement
top-up from relatives. As the levels
of local authority and CGC funding
have continued to fall behind in real
terms for many years, we felt we
had no other option than to increase
our private pay element in our
communities to provide up-to-date
social care by investing in our people,
buildings and service offerings.
The impact of legislation
Legislation has definitely improved
quality in the adult social care sector, and
the work of the CQC has added value for
residents. The challenges for providers lie
in the scope for interpretation available
to individual inspectors, some of whom
are professionals from other service
sectors with different specific knowledge.
A concerning statistic is the number
of homes closing due to the pressures
of legislation and how impactful a
critical report can be; set against rising
demand, this should be a warning signal.
Many smaller operators find it hard to
bounce back from a negative report;
it is right that poor standards should
be highlighted and eradicated, but the
value is in the support to make better,
and to exercise the right amount of
proportionality.
Staff recruitment has become harder,
requiring wages and other package
benefits to increase at a rate beyond
inflation. This is now not restricted
to the well-known issue of nurse
availability, but is a feature for all
levels of carers in some areas. The
progress of the National Living Wage
has increased costs significantly for the
sector, as the majority of employees
are at the lower end of the pay scale.
The knock-on effect is that those in the
grades above also require additional
pay to maintain the differentiation
between roles and reward for
greaterresponsibilities.
Birchmere House,
Knowle
As funding
has fallen
behind in real
terms for
many years,
we had no
other option
than to
increase the
percentage of
our private
pay residents
17AVERY HEALTHCARE |
CARE
We also see competition from the drive
by many local authorities to reduce
costs by providing a minimum level of
domiciliary care for those in need at
their homes. While this may work for
some individuals, we see it does little to
address loneliness, does not provide the
time for proactive care and wellbeing,
and outside of carer visits, the need
for help can then add to the workload
of the ambulance service. The growth
of assisted living or extra care options
that seek to disassociate themselves
from the stigma of being a care home
has also had an impact on the sector,
although with the domiciliary care
packages available from an on-site
provider, it is effectively the same thing
under a different name.
To address these challenges, we have
taken a number of steps:
»launching a “ReConnect Programme”
with collaborative research from
Leeds Beckett University, delivering
leading-edge dementia care as
demand grows in this area
»launching our structured 15-phase
“Well-being Programme” with
a measurement tool to evidence
outcomes
»creating a comprehensive training
programme to attract, develop
and retain staff at all levels.
Thisincludes two-year in-house care
apprenticeships to levels two, three,
four and five, career pathways for all
and internal succession planning
»responding to the nurse shortage by
pioneering a new advanced senior
carer role, the only such course in
the UK accredited by City & Guilds.
We also help to adjust the skill
mix to support nurses and work to
upskill nurses through additional
clinicaltraining
»focusing on culinary standards to
support nutrition, health and the
demand for better dining
»recognising staff through an annual
internal awards programme plus
promotion of staff and homes for
independent external awards
We have had to adapt and use our
resources to best effect, focusing on
what enhances residents’ quality of life
and experiences. This is not a target
but an ongoing process, in no small
part driven by the forecastable increase
in demand as the population ages and
its needs develop. For government to
create the environment for success
and really support this growing
requirement, it needs to truly deliver
a co-ordinated approach between the
current silos of health and social care.
Government
needs to create
the
environment
for success with
a co-ordinated
approach
between the
health and
social care silos
Derby Heights, Derby
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | AVERY HEALTHCARE
The importance of feedback
We operate staff surveys as well as
resident surveys to ensure that we are
listening to, and learning from, both
groups at all times. Being responsive
and supportive is embedded into our
stated values, along with care for all,
honesty, credibility and innovation. We
endeavour to recognise individuality
and treat everyone with respect,
make life meaningful, do the right
thing and build trust, lead in quality
and continually improve and enable
everyone to achieve their potential.
In common with other care operators,
adaptability and resilience have been
required to maintain progress as the
provision of care becomes ever more
complex. That complexity is found in
the needs of the residents, generally
now with multiple conditions to
support, plus the demands for non-
care services, akin to hotels, as more
of the senior generation have the
wherewithal to purchase preferred
service levels. We have chosen to
position our offering towards the
premium end of the market, attracting
more self-funded residents, to facilitate
the business model that can meet that
demand for quality in lifestyle as well
as quality in care.
Just over 70 per cent of our residents
are privately financed, with the rest
funded by local authorities and
some with a lifestyle supplement
top-up from relatives. As the levels
of local authority and CGC funding
have continued to fall behind in real
terms for many years, we felt we
had no other option than to increase
our private pay element in our
communities to provide up-to-date
social care by investing in our people,
buildings and service offerings.
The impact of legislation
Legislation has definitely improved
quality in the adult social care sector, and
the work of the CQC has added value for
residents. The challenges for providers lie
in the scope for interpretation available
to individual inspectors, some of whom
are professionals from other service
sectors with different specific knowledge.
A concerning statistic is the number
of homes closing due to the pressures
of legislation and how impactful a
critical report can be; set against rising
demand, this should be a warning signal.
Many smaller operators find it hard to
bounce back from a negative report;
it is right that poor standards should
be highlighted and eradicated, but the
value is in the support to make better,
and to exercise the right amount of
proportionality.
Staff recruitment has become harder,
requiring wages and other package
benefits to increase at a rate beyond
inflation. This is now not restricted
to the well-known issue of nurse
availability, but is a feature for all
levels of carers in some areas. The
progress of the National Living Wage
has increased costs significantly for the
sector, as the majority of employees
are at the lower end of the pay scale.
The knock-on effect is that those in the
grades above also require additional
pay to maintain the differentiation
between roles and reward for
greaterresponsibilities.
Birchmere House,
Knowle
As funding
has fallen
behind in real
terms for
many years,
we had no
other option
than to
increase the
percentage of
our private
pay residents
17AVERY HEALTHCARE |
CARE
We also see competition from the drive
by many local authorities to reduce
costs by providing a minimum level of
domiciliary care for those in need at
their homes. While this may work for
some individuals, we see it does little to
address loneliness, does not provide the
time for proactive care and wellbeing,
and outside of carer visits, the need
for help can then add to the workload
of the ambulance service. The growth
of assisted living or extra care options
that seek to disassociate themselves
from the stigma of being a care home
has also had an impact on the sector,
although with the domiciliary care
packages available from an on-site
provider, it is effectively the same thing
under a different name.
To address these challenges, we have
taken a number of steps:
»launching a “ReConnect Programme”
with collaborative research from
Leeds Beckett University, delivering
leading-edge dementia care as
demand grows in this area
»launching our structured 15-phase
“Well-being Programme” with
a measurement tool to evidence
outcomes
»creating a comprehensive training
programme to attract, develop
and retain staff at all levels.
Thisincludes two-year in-house care
apprenticeships to levels two, three,
four and five, career pathways for all
and internal succession planning
»responding to the nurse shortage by
pioneering a new advanced senior
carer role, the only such course in
the UK accredited by City & Guilds.
We also help to adjust the skill
mix to support nurses and work to
upskill nurses through additional
clinicaltraining
»focusing on culinary standards to
support nutrition, health and the
demand for better dining
»recognising staff through an annual
internal awards programme plus
promotion of staff and homes for
independent external awards
We have had to adapt and use our
resources to best effect, focusing on
what enhances residents’ quality of life
and experiences. This is not a target
but an ongoing process, in no small
part driven by the forecastable increase
in demand as the population ages and
its needs develop. For government to
create the environment for success
and really support this growing
requirement, it needs to truly deliver
a co-ordinated approach between the
current silos of health and social care.
Government
needs to create
the
environment
for success with
a co-ordinated
approach
between the
health and
social care silos
Derby Heights, Derby

www.averyhealthcare.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Avery Healthcare. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development