Baycroft Care Homes

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Baycroft Care Homes's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Baycroft Care Homes is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

baycroft.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | BAYCROFT CARE HOMES
Martin D’Mello, Group Director of
Care & Support at OneHousing
Baycroft Great Baddow
foyer and café
Baycroft design and deliver elegant residential care homes
within the UK with a focus on the South East. Aiming to
support the individual needs of their residents, their service
is grounded in six core values, all of which help to protect the
individuality of those they care for. To support their residential
projects, they have created a customer services committee,
ensuring accountability through the feedback and involvement
of residents. Group Director of Care & Support at One Housing,
Martin D’Mello tells
The Parliamentary Review
about Baycroft’s
expansion into the care market and how they have tackled
industry staff shortages.
Baycroft was established in 2016 by One Housing, one of the UK’s largest housing
associations with over 50 years’ experience managing 15,000 homes in the South
East.Entering this new market allowed us to fulfil our vision of moving beyond
building and selling of residential homes and into the provision of private care. It
also ensured long-term investment in our core purpose of delivering affordable
housing to the market, with profits generated by Baycroft being invested back into
our housing and support services.
Our vision and values
Our central vision is to help people retain their individuality while providing them
with that extra bit of care, security and comfort as they grow older. In order to
FACTS ABOUT
BAYCROFT CARE HOMES
»Group Director of Care &
Support of One Housing:
Martin D’Mello
»Established in 2016
»Based in London
»Services: Residential, nursing
and dementia care
»No. of employees: around 200
»Baycroft are owned by
OneHousing, one of the UK’s
largest housing associations
Baycroft Care Homes
19BAYCROFT CARE HOMES |
CARE
implement this vision, we apply six core
values throughout the organisation:
»Quality of care
»Quality of homes and surroundings
»Luxury lifestyle
»Lifestyle of choice
»Pride in service
»View people as individuals with
individual needs
Growth and development
Employing these values, we have
expanded quickly, opening five homes
since 2016 in Orpington, Chelmsford,
Flitwick, Fairfield and Kempston. We
have a home in Watford opening
in spring 2020 and a seventh home
opening in Tunbridge Wells in 2021.
On the service development side, in
March 2019, we created acustomer
services committee.The committee
builds on our strong history of resident
involvement and engagement by
creating a strong link between our
group board and our resident panels.
The committee, which will meet four
times a year, aims to raise issues that
can influence our future strategies
while equally providing a clear route to
decision-making, ensuring the board
has accountability.
Further to this, a new customer
service strategy is being developed.
This strategy, a central part of
ourcorporate plan, will guide us in
improving overall customer experience,
helping us to ensure that we respond
to changes that are impacting the
lives of our residents. Finally, we are
also setting out a clear offer in a new
residents’ charter.
A shifting industry and
demographic
Demographics in the UK have been
changing, resulting in major challenges
for both the UK government and
operators of care homes. Although
more people are living longer, many
are also suffering from chronic
health conditions that need constant
monitoring, care and support.
The care home industry has also had
to adapt to changing consumer needs.
This has been achieved by developing
modern, consumer-led homes that
concentrate on nursing care for
increasingly elderly customers with
significant care needs and dementia
care, addressing both mental health
and significant physical frailty.
A well-designed new-build care
home is fundamentally different to
the institutional and, in many cases,
obsolete homes historically funded
by local authorities. Most can provide
a friendly environment that enables
people with later-stage dementia to
safely move around.
CGI of Baycroft
Carpenders Park, Watford
More in
common with
a high-quality
hotel than a
traditional
converted
residential
home or
institution
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
19BAYCROFT CARE HOMES |
CARE
implement this vision, we apply six core
values throughout the organisation:
»Quality of care
»Quality of homes and surroundings
»Luxury lifestyle
»Lifestyle of choice
»Pride in service
»View people as individuals with
individual needs
Growth and development
Employing these values, we have
expanded quickly, opening five homes
since 2016 in Orpington, Chelmsford,
Flitwick, Fairfield and Kempston. We
have a home in Watford opening
in spring 2020 and a seventh home
opening in Tunbridge Wells in 2021.
On the service development side, in
March 2019, we created acustomer
services committee.The committee
builds on our strong history of resident
involvement and engagement by
creating a strong link between our
group board and our resident panels.
The committee, which will meet four
times a year, aims to raise issues that
can influence our future strategies
while equally providing a clear route to
decision-making, ensuring the board
has accountability.
Further to this, a new customer
service strategy is being developed.
This strategy, a central part of
ourcorporate plan, will guide us in
improving overall customer experience,
helping us to ensure that we respond
to changes that are impacting the
lives of our residents. Finally, we are
also setting out a clear offer in a new
residents’ charter.
A shifting industry and
demographic
Demographics in the UK have been
changing, resulting in major challenges
for both the UK government and
operators of care homes. Although
more people are living longer, many
are also suffering from chronic
health conditions that need constant
monitoring, care and support.
The care home industry has also had
to adapt to changing consumer needs.
This has been achieved by developing
modern, consumer-led homes that
concentrate on nursing care for
increasingly elderly customers with
significant care needs and dementia
care, addressing both mental health
and significant physical frailty.
A well-designed new-build care
home is fundamentally different to
the institutional and, in many cases,
obsolete homes historically funded
by local authorities. Most can provide
a friendly environment that enables
people with later-stage dementia to
safely move around.
CGI of Baycroft
Carpenders Park, Watford
More in
common with
a high-quality
hotel than a
traditional
converted
residential
home or
institution
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
20 | BAYCROFT CARE HOMES
Our homes are, therefore, aspirational
in design, fit and customer service, with
more in common with a high-quality
hotel than a traditional converted
residential home or institution. Homes
typically include 70 to 80 bedrooms
with en-suite wet rooms over two
or three levels. Attention is paid to
including facilities and services, such as
hair and beauty salons, a quality dining
experience, entertainment rooms for
visiting grandchildren, cinema facilities
and therapy suites, that bring value to
the home for both older people and
theirfamilies.
The socioeconomic profile of older
people choosing a consumer-led care
home is usually a modest homeowner,
with a home valued over £275,000.
An individual’s decision to move into
a care home is strongly influenced
by their family and is usually made
when other options of receiving care
are exhausted. The average length of
occupancy is typically 18 to 24 months.
Implementing this project, we had
several key objectives. We wanted to
address the underprovision of fit-for-
purpose nursing and dementia beds
in carefully chosen areas in the home
counties and the South East, create a
place that people in need of care will
be proud to call home, and their visiting
friends and family are proud to visit,
and focus on the positive hotel-feel and
lifestyle experience on offer with discreet
personalised care and support provided.
Challenges and shortfalls
One of the key challenges we have
been facing is a shortage of nurses and
care staff resulting in increased use
of agency staff. Although this covers
shortfall on a temporary basis, it is more
costly and impacts team morale across
the organisation. Moreover, there is
less consistency throughout the team,
as temporary staff are less likely to be
trained in the same way as our own
staff are, to meet our vision and values.
A number of issues have resulted from
our recent and ongoing expansions.
Increases in land costs have impacted
land affordability and project validity,
and deadlines have been pushed back
by local planners and communities
while agreeing planning consent.
Brexit is an ongoing challenge, with
the potential for reductions in supply
chain availability and increased prices
on food, medication and staffing.
Brexit may also impact house prices.
Further to this, there is growing
competition within the sector with an
increased consumer-led offering, and
we will continue to strive to achieve
‘Outstanding’ in the Care Quality
Commission (CQC) auditing process
across all our homes.
With five homes currently open, we
are able to learn from our experience
and understand areas requiring
improvement. We are excited about
our future and the new homes that
we will be opening over the coming
months and years and will implement
our experience to ensure that these
homes provide the best possible
care for our residents. Likewise, we
will continue to respect resident
feedback through our customer service
committee and employ people with
industry knowledge and expert skills.
We are excited
about our
future and the
new homes
that we will
be opening
Children’s entertainment
room at Baycroft in
Orpington

baycroft.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Baycroft Care Homes. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development