BBC

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by BBC's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from BBC is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.bbc.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
14 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
Glastonbury organisers
have promised a
cleaner and more
environmentally-friendly
festival ahead of their
50th anniversary
According to statistics from Glastonbury,
one million plastic water bottles were
sold at the festival in 2017; a figure
which, in 2019, fell tozero.
Organiser Emily Eavis, daughter of the
original founder Michael Eavis, said:
“We’ve made so many positive strides
with our green campaigns this year.
It’s incredible to think that there will
be one million fewer plastic bottles for
the planet to deal with because we’ve
stopped selling them.
“The most eye-opening part of the
weekend for me was not seeing
any plastic bottles in the bins or on
theground.
“I think people are really starting to
understand how important it is to treat
the land with respect, and to stop living
a disposable lifestyle.”
Festival organisers also urged all
festivalgoers to take their tents home
as, in previous years, many had simply
left disposable tents at the site.
The “Love the Farm, Leave no Trace”
pledge, which was introduced in 2017,
saw a reported 81 per cent reduction
in the number of abandoned tents
compared to the previous year.
Following this year’s festival concluding,
Eavis tweeted that 99.3 per cent of tents
had been taken home, a significant
improvement on previous years.
After the festival ends, a massive clean-
up operation is organised to return the
site, which was home to 200,000, to a
dairy farm.
On the Monday following the festival’s
conclusion, a team of 1,300 volunteers
began to clean the area. Each volunteer
carries bin bags made from recycled
plastic, which is later recycled after the
clean-up is completed, to collect rubbish
left on the ground and in the 15,000
bins that are scattered across the site.
This process usually takes six weeks.
In 2017, more than 60 tonnes of
card and paper, 32 tonnes of glasses,
45 tonnes of cans and 40 tonnes of
plastic bottles were recycled. Alongside
this, 132 tonnes of food waste was
converted into compost and 4,500
litres of cooking oil was turned
intobiofuel.
Roughly 40 per cent of revellers attend
Glastonbury via public transport,
and since the turn of the century,
10,000 trees have been planted in the
localarea.
Next year will see the 50thanniversary
of Glastonbury. Mrs Eavis vowed: “We
won’t be slowing down for very long.
We have already started working on
next year’s 50th anniversary.
“Trust me when I say we are planning a
huge celebration.”
The details of this celebration have not
been announced as
The Parliamentary
Review
goes to print, but acts, agents
and fans alike are eagerly awaiting
details of the largest UK festival’s
semicentennial celebrations.
15BBC |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Glastonbury organisers
have promised a
cleaner and more
environmentally-friendly
festival ahead of their
50th anniversary
According to statistics from Glastonbury,
one million plastic water bottles were
sold at the festival in 2017; a figure
which, in 2019, fell tozero.
Organiser Emily Eavis, daughter of the
original founder Michael Eavis, said:
“We’ve made so many positive strides
with our green campaigns this year.
It’s incredible to think that there will
be one million fewer plastic bottles for
the planet to deal with because we’ve
stopped selling them.
“The most eye-opening part of the
weekend for me was not seeing
any plastic bottles in the bins or on
theground.
“I think people are really starting to
understand how important it is to treat
the land with respect, and to stop living
a disposable lifestyle.”
Festival organisers also urged all
festivalgoers to take their tents home
as, in previous years, many had simply
left disposable tents at the site.
The “Love the Farm, Leave no Trace”
pledge, which was introduced in 2017,
saw a reported 81 per cent reduction
in the number of abandoned tents
compared to the previous year.
Following this year’s festival concluding,
Eavis tweeted that 99.3 per cent of tents
had been taken home, a significant
improvement on previous years.
After the festival ends, a massive clean-
up operation is organised to return the
site, which was home to 200,000, to a
dairy farm.
On the Monday following the festival’s
conclusion, a team of 1,300 volunteers
began to clean the area. Each volunteer
carries bin bags made from recycled
plastic, which is later recycled after the
clean-up is completed, to collect rubbish
left on the ground and in the 15,000
bins that are scattered across the site.
This process usually takes six weeks.
In 2017, more than 60 tonnes of
card and paper, 32 tonnes of glasses,
45 tonnes of cans and 40 tonnes of
plastic bottles were recycled. Alongside
this, 132 tonnes of food waste was
converted into compost and 4,500
litres of cooking oil was turned
intobiofuel.
Roughly 40 per cent of revellers attend
Glastonbury via public transport,
and since the turn of the century,
10,000 trees have been planted in the
localarea.
Next year will see the 50thanniversary
of Glastonbury. Mrs Eavis vowed: “We
won’t be slowing down for very long.
We have already started working on
next year’s 50th anniversary.
“Trust me when I say we are planning a
huge celebration.”
The details of this celebration have not
been announced as
The Parliamentary
Review
goes to print, but acts, agents
and fans alike are eagerly awaiting
details of the largest UK festival’s
semicentennial celebrations.
Director-General
Lord Hall of Birkenhead CBE
Strictly Come Dancing
has been sold
to over 40 territories across the globe
The BBC was founded almost a century ago with a simple
mission: to inform, educate and entertain. Today, the BBC
enhances the lives of almost everyone in the UK – around
40 million people use it every day, and more than 90 per cent of
adults every week. Its global services now reach over 425 million
people worldwide. Director-General of the BBC Lord Tony Hall
discusses the increasingly important role of the BBC for the UK.
The BBC is the greatest cultural force in Britain, and perhaps the strongest cultural
force for Britain in the world. It has the power to make a real impact for change
and for good.
This is something that has always been in our DNA. Our public service mission
was set almost 100 years ago by the BBC’s founding father, Lord Reith: to inform,
educate and entertain. That mission is as pertinent now as it was then.
Today, however, the BBC can and must do even more. As the historian R.H. Tawney
put it: “Only those institutions are loved that touch the imagination”.
The digital age, and all the technological tools at our disposal, mean that we now
have the ability to capture the imagination of our audiences like never before. Every
advance represents an opportunity to deliver our public service mission in new
and exciting ways and, in doing so, to dramatically expand the impact we have for
audiences and for the country.
The cornerstone of British creativity
First and foremost, our role is to make great programmes and services. Nothing
matters more to our audiences than the content we create.
FACTS ABOUT
BRITISH BROADCASTING
CORPORATION
»Director-General:
Lord Hall of Birkenhead CBE
»Chairman: Sir David Clementi
»Established in 1922
»Headquarters in London
»Services: Mass media and
broadcasting
»No. of employees: Over
19,000
»The BBC is the world’s
oldest national broadcasting
organisation
»Global services reach over 425
million people worldwide
BBC
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | BBC
More than 180 major awards over
the past year tell their own story, not
to mention over 20 Emmy Award
nominations. Programmes such as
Bodyguard, Fleabag, Line of Duty
and
A Very English Scandal
show how we
continue to drive British creativity.
Meanwhile, world-class factual
programmes such as
Blue Planet II
and recent seasons on mental health
demonstrate the impact the BBC can
have in addressing some of society’s
most pressing problems.
It is the BBC’s duty to make
programmes about British people and
British culture. We remain the largest
single investor in original, home-grown
content. This matters even more in an
increasingly competitive global market.
We know that British audiences enjoy
the quality and breadth of choice that
the big global players bring, but they
also want local content that speaks
to them directly and reflects their
lives, content that is at risk of being
squeezed out.
British content is not just vital for our
audiences – it is crucial for the country
as a whole. As the UK seeks to reshape
its relationship with the world, it
needs the BBC more than ever as the
cornerstone of our world-class creative
industries, and to carry Britain’s voice,
values and influence across the globe.
Trusted, impartial news
News is another area in which the role
the BBC plays for society is not just as
important and relevant as ever, but has
become much more so.
That is because the democratic values
that underpin our mission have grown
increasingly important to the country:
independence and impartiality,
representing all parts of the UK,
making sure everyone has a voice,
whoever and wherever they are.
These are ideals that have always been
highly prized – today, however, they
are priceless.
In a world awash with misinformation,
we know audiences come to the BBC
for trusted, impartial news. At a time
when the country feels divided and
fragmented, audiences need the BBC
to reflect the views and perspectives of
the whole of the UK. It is fundamental
to our public service responsibility to
make sure all diverse voices are heard.
It is also our duty to bring the country
together around shared national
moments and remind us of everything
we have in common. Twenty million
people across the country joined us to
mark the 100th anniversary of the end
of First World War last year, and 22
million joined us for the royal wedding,
with millions more watching the
worldover.
Reinventing BBC services
If the BBC’s public service mission has
never been more important, how we
deliver it to our audiences has never
needed to evolve more quickly.
The extraordinary growth of our
global competitors in recent years
has dramatically reshaped the media
landscape around us. Together with
rapid technological progress, it has
transformed the expectations of
ouraudiences.
The BBC’s
Beyond Fake
News
project aims to
spearhead the fight for
media literacy worldwide
British content
is not just vital
for British
audiences – it
is crucial for
the country as
a whole
17BBC |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
At the start of 2017, we secured
the BBC’s future scale, scope and
system of funding through a new
eleven-year royal charter and licence
fee guarantee. That has given us the
platform to pursue an ambitious plan
to reinvent the BBC.
Our audiences are already starting
to experience what that means. Last
year, we set out plans to transform
BBC iPlayer from a catch-up service
to a destination in its own right,
including by extending the availability
of programmes to 12 months.
Killing Eve
was a sign of our ambition.
Released as a box set, it had more than
45 million iPlayer requests. A record
16 million streaming requests for
Glastonbury showed how the BBC’s
“live” offer can set us apart.
Last year also saw the launch of BBC
Sounds, bringing together all our
radio, music and podcasts in one
place. We know that, increasingly,
it is through our online services that
audiences will expect to receive value
for their licencefee.
A strong, thriving BBC
The BBC’s latest plans also reflect the
importance of owning and controlling
intellectual property in today’s media
marketplace.
Last year we took the bold decision
to bring together our production
and distribution arms into a single
commercial entity: BBC Studios.
The move enables us to protect the
values of the BBC and offers new
opportunities for creativity, partnership
and growth. This year BBC Studios
generated record returns of £243
million to reinvest in the public service.
We have also announced that, as part
of a series of deals with Discovery, BBC
Studios has taken control of UKTV and
the bulk of its channels. Most recently,
we took the decision with ITV to launch
a new subscription streaming service in
the UK, BritBox, providing an unrivalled
collection of British boxsets and original
series, on demand, all in one place.
I am very proud of what the BBC has
achieved in its first century. Our success
has been based on the clarity of our
mission, the quality of our talent and
our constant desire to innovate. That
is what motivates us every day, and it
is why I am confident that a strong,
thriving BBC in its second century can
do more than ever for theUK. Jodie Whittaker stars
as
Doctor Who
in the
longest-running sci-fi
drama on television
In a world
awash with
misinformation,
we know
audiences come
to the BBC for
trusted, impartial
news
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | BBC
More than 180 major awards over
the past year tell their own story, not
to mention over 20 Emmy Award
nominations. Programmes such as
Bodyguard, Fleabag, Line of Duty
and
A Very English Scandal
show how we
continue to drive British creativity.
Meanwhile, world-class factual
programmes such as
Blue Planet II
and recent seasons on mental health
demonstrate the impact the BBC can
have in addressing some of society’s
most pressing problems.
It is the BBC’s duty to make
programmes about British people and
British culture. We remain the largest
single investor in original, home-grown
content. This matters even more in an
increasingly competitive global market.
We know that British audiences enjoy
the quality and breadth of choice that
the big global players bring, but they
also want local content that speaks
to them directly and reflects their
lives, content that is at risk of being
squeezed out.
British content is not just vital for our
audiences – it is crucial for the country
as a whole. As the UK seeks to reshape
its relationship with the world, it
needs the BBC more than ever as the
cornerstone of our world-class creative
industries, and to carry Britain’s voice,
values and influence across the globe.
Trusted, impartial news
News is another area in which the role
the BBC plays for society is not just as
important and relevant as ever, but has
become much more so.
That is because the democratic values
that underpin our mission have grown
increasingly important to the country:
independence and impartiality,
representing all parts of the UK,
making sure everyone has a voice,
whoever and wherever they are.
These are ideals that have always been
highly prized – today, however, they
are priceless.
In a world awash with misinformation,
we know audiences come to the BBC
for trusted, impartial news. At a time
when the country feels divided and
fragmented, audiences need the BBC
to reflect the views and perspectives of
the whole of the UK. It is fundamental
to our public service responsibility to
make sure all diverse voices are heard.
It is also our duty to bring the country
together around shared national
moments and remind us of everything
we have in common. Twenty million
people across the country joined us to
mark the 100th anniversary of the end
of First World War last year, and 22
million joined us for the royal wedding,
with millions more watching the
worldover.
Reinventing BBC services
If the BBC’s public service mission has
never been more important, how we
deliver it to our audiences has never
needed to evolve more quickly.
The extraordinary growth of our
global competitors in recent years
has dramatically reshaped the media
landscape around us. Together with
rapid technological progress, it has
transformed the expectations of
ouraudiences.
The BBC’s
Beyond Fake
News
project aims to
spearhead the fight for
media literacy worldwide
British content
is not just vital
for British
audiences – it
is crucial for
the country as
a whole
17BBC |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
At the start of 2017, we secured
the BBC’s future scale, scope and
system of funding through a new
eleven-year royal charter and licence
fee guarantee. That has given us the
platform to pursue an ambitious plan
to reinvent the BBC.
Our audiences are already starting
to experience what that means. Last
year, we set out plans to transform
BBC iPlayer from a catch-up service
to a destination in its own right,
including by extending the availability
of programmes to 12 months.
Killing Eve
was a sign of our ambition.
Released as a box set, it had more than
45 million iPlayer requests. A record
16 million streaming requests for
Glastonbury showed how the BBC’s
“live” offer can set us apart.
Last year also saw the launch of BBC
Sounds, bringing together all our
radio, music and podcasts in one
place. We know that, increasingly,
it is through our online services that
audiences will expect to receive value
for their licencefee.
A strong, thriving BBC
The BBC’s latest plans also reflect the
importance of owning and controlling
intellectual property in today’s media
marketplace.
Last year we took the bold decision
to bring together our production
and distribution arms into a single
commercial entity: BBC Studios.
The move enables us to protect the
values of the BBC and offers new
opportunities for creativity, partnership
and growth. This year BBC Studios
generated record returns of £243
million to reinvest in the public service.
We have also announced that, as part
of a series of deals with Discovery, BBC
Studios has taken control of UKTV and
the bulk of its channels. Most recently,
we took the decision with ITV to launch
a new subscription streaming service in
the UK, BritBox, providing an unrivalled
collection of British boxsets and original
series, on demand, all in one place.
I am very proud of what the BBC has
achieved in its first century. Our success
has been based on the clarity of our
mission, the quality of our talent and
our constant desire to innovate. That
is what motivates us every day, and it
is why I am confident that a strong,
thriving BBC in its second century can
do more than ever for theUK. Jodie Whittaker stars
as
Doctor Who
in the
longest-running sci-fi
drama on television
In a world
awash with
misinformation,
we know
audiences come
to the BBC for
trusted, impartial
news

www.bbc.co.uk

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster