Beckenham & Bromley Chiropractic Clinic

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Beckenham & Bromley Chiropractic Clinic's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Beckenham & Bromley Chiropractic Clinic is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

bromleybackcare.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
28 | THE FREMANTLE TRUST
This underinvestment in technology
is far more deep-rooted, spanning
thesector. Not only would a system
that seamlessly integrates the provision
of care, administration of medication,
compliance and rota management be
too expensive: it simply does not exist.
The ever-increasing need for a
diverse workforce
The increased acuity of people moving
into The Fremantle Trust care homes
means residents are requiring more
intensive care than ever. Our nursing
homes are carrying out procedures that
were previously limited to hospitals.
We do employ nurses, but they often
find themselves working largely in
isolation, relatively unsupported by
primary care orgeriatricians.
There is a chronic shortage of
dedicated dementia nurses.
Collaborating more closely with
colleagues in mainstream healthcare
represents an opportunity for the
whole system to work together. This
would allow older people to be cared
for in the right place at the right time.
Residents could, for instance, be
discharged into a care home from a
hospital for a period of recuperation
before going home, allowing them
to avoid a lengthy stay in hospital or
helping them to reach the end of their
life comfortably and with dignity.
As needs intensify, the skills and
experience required of the workforce
is increasing but the remuneration
care workers receive has lagged
behind such change. The majority
of the workforce is female, and the
majority of people living in our homes
arewomen.
Social care is a gendered issue and
there is no doubt that the value we
place on care is influenced by the
fact that we have a largely part-time,
female-segregated labour force, doing
work that is often carried out for
free by women in society – caring for
arelative.
While turnover is still higher than in
other sectors at around 19 per cent,
at The Fremantle Trust our workforce
is relatively stable and this represents
a real commitment by our employees,
who perform a personally rewarding
role. Care work is not like stacking
shelves or working in a call centre –
the satisfaction can be immense.
Why, then, do we neglect the social
care workforce by failing to recognise
and rewarding the skilled work
that they do on behalf of society?
Social care desperately needs a
confident, well-trained and well-paid
workforce complemented by the latest
technology. We are still some way
from seeing this realised, but we are
confident that every step we take helps
to make a difference across thesector.
We expect to continue to work in
partnership with local authorities
and the health system to ensure
that service users experience great
support. We want to make the best
use of technology to reduce the need
for labour in delivering personal care,
thus freeing up worker time to build
relationships with individuals and
families and enabling people to lead a
full life based on their choice.
Social care
desperately
needs a
confident,
well-trained
and well-paid
workforce
complemented
by the latest
technology
We support Gary to live
independently
29BECKENHAM & BROMLEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
Managing Director ClareMetcalfe
Beckenham and Bromley
Chiropractic Clinic, Bromley
Managing Director Clare Metcalfe tells
TheParliamentary
Review
that The Beckenham and Bromley Chiropractic
Clinic in south London has been committed to
helping people return to a healthy and normal life since 1984.
Treating everything from back and neck pain to repetitive strain
injury and sports injuries, Clare says that a dedicated team of
chiropractors, massage therapists, reflexologists and counsellors
have helped the clinic to become one of the most established in
the south London area.
In August 1984, at the age 24, I opened Beckenham and Bromley Chiropractic
Clinic. I had previously graduated from the Anglo-European College of Chiropractic,
at the time the only training college in Europe. Chiropractic was still in its infancy
in the UK with only a couple of hundred chiropractors working here, and not many
people knew what chiropractic was.
When I set up the clinic, the only form of advertising allowed was an opening
notice in the local press and an entry in the Yellow Pages, which were printed
annually. My advertisement had been omitted so publicity was slow to start.
On inviting 60 local GPs to the practice to learn about the clinic and chiropractic,
only two turned up. These GPs then began referring patients to see me, causing
word to spread, and gradually I began to see more patients.
FACTS ABOUT
BECKENHAM & BROMLEY
CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
»Managing Director:
ClareMetcalfe
»Founded in 1984
»Located in Beckenham and
Bromley
»Services: Chiropractic
»No. of employees: 9
»There is a 100-year age range
in our clients
Beckenham & Bromley
Chiropractic Clinic
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
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THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | BECKENHAM & BROMLEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Backbreaking work
Initially, I had hoped to work in
another clinic as an associate while
building my practice. However,
the job offer which had been
tendered was then given to another
chiropractorinstead.
This, combined with astronomical
interest rates and the cost of
purchasing a house in the Home
Counties, meant my parents agreed
to act as guarantors for my mortgage
in addition to borrowing money to
subsidise me in the initial phase of
building my practice.
Obtaining change of use permission
from Bromley Council and
subsequently gaining planning
permission for an extension were
major hurdles. Later, having outgrown
my initial property, I began looking for
something larger, so I could move both
practice and home.
Planning permission did not just extend
to the building and change of use; I
was also required to provide off-street
parking for all patients and staff as well
as family members at all times. Itried
three times to obtain the relevant
permissions before I found the next
clinic premises and the move eventually
took place when I was four months
pregnant with my second daughter.
We worked on the Wednesday, moved
on the Thursday and opened in the
new premises on the Friday.
Back to backs
I have taken on many receptionists and
associates over the years. I became a
mother to two daughters and dealt
with self-employed maternity pay as
well as childcare. I returned to work
three months after each birth and kept
the practice running between sleepless
nights and baby feeds.
Some associates were more successful
than others and for years I had no
holidays and paid associates more
than I was paying myself. Nonetheless,
the practice was busy, with happy
patients referring friends and family
to us, while we were receiving more
and more referrals from GPs and
consultants. Since starting the practice,
I have mentored over 20 recently
qualifiedchiropractors.
Clare Metcalfe treating
a patient
The move
eventually
took place
when I was
four months
pregnant with
my second
daughter. We
worked on the
Wednesday,
moved on the
Thursday and
opened in the
new premises
on the Friday
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | BECKENHAM & BROMLEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Backbreaking work
Initially, I had hoped to work in
another clinic as an associate while
building my practice. However,
the job offer which had been
tendered was then given to another
chiropractorinstead.
This, combined with astronomical
interest rates and the cost of
purchasing a house in the Home
Counties, meant my parents agreed
to act as guarantors for my mortgage
in addition to borrowing money to
subsidise me in the initial phase of
building my practice.
Obtaining change of use permission
from Bromley Council and
subsequently gaining planning
permission for an extension were
major hurdles. Later, having outgrown
my initial property, I began looking for
something larger, so I could move both
practice and home.
Planning permission did not just extend
to the building and change of use; I
was also required to provide off-street
parking for all patients and staff as well
as family members at all times. Itried
three times to obtain the relevant
permissions before I found the next
clinic premises and the move eventually
took place when I was four months
pregnant with my second daughter.
We worked on the Wednesday, moved
on the Thursday and opened in the
new premises on the Friday.
Back to backs
I have taken on many receptionists and
associates over the years. I became a
mother to two daughters and dealt
with self-employed maternity pay as
well as childcare. I returned to work
three months after each birth and kept
the practice running between sleepless
nights and baby feeds.
Some associates were more successful
than others and for years I had no
holidays and paid associates more
than I was paying myself. Nonetheless,
the practice was busy, with happy
patients referring friends and family
to us, while we were receiving more
and more referrals from GPs and
consultants. Since starting the practice,
I have mentored over 20 recently
qualifiedchiropractors.
Clare Metcalfe treating
a patient
The move
eventually
took place
when I was
four months
pregnant with
my second
daughter. We
worked on the
Wednesday,
moved on the
Thursday and
opened in the
new premises
on the Friday
31BECKENHAM & BROMLEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
Backed by the state
Our profession worked for many years to
obtain state registration: only those with
proper and adequate training should be
able to call themselves a chiropractor
and they should also be monitored by
a regulatory body. I invited our local
MP to visit the practice to persuade him
to petition a private member’s bill to
instigate this. As a result of this meeting
and his support, I am now in Hansard
and the bill was eventually passed.
Social media
We find the advent of social media has
provided its own challenges, especially
articles that discuss everything, from
lack of training – indeed, we undertake
a four to five-year master’s course
including internship in a state-of-the-
art clinic – to unfounded comments
regarding side-effects of treatment.
The fact that these writers ignore the
research completely speaks volumes
about their own professional practice
as opposed to ours.
No turning back
Chiropractic is more relevant today
than it has ever been, with a rapid
increase in the aging population
among other factors. We are
becoming increasingly aware of the
consequences of a poor diet and a
lack of exercise, and we recognise
that medication cannot cure poor
lifestyle. With an increasing focus
on the side-effects of medications
and the need to take them sparingly,
the words of a local GP still ring in
my head: “I like referring patients
to see you because I know that the
NHS has so little to offer them except
painkillers and I know that you will
be able to do far more for them
thanthat.”
The youngest patient I have seen was
two weeks old, the oldest 101, and for
35 years, despite adversity, I still love
my job. I am proud that I have made,
and continue to make, a difference to
people’s lives every day.
Since starting
the practice,
Ihave
mentored over
20 recently
qualified
chiropractors
Clare in the clinic

bromleybackcare.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Beckenham & Bromley Chiropractic Clinic. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development