Bespoke Healthcare

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Bespoke Healthcare's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Bespoke Healthcare is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.bespokehealthcare.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
56 | BESPOKE HEALTHCARE
Delivering a community-based
healthcare model
Executive Chairman
GwamC.Rajiah
Operations Director
SaraRajiah
Bespoke Healthcare is the leading independent provider of
nerve conduction study tests for NHS hospitals throughout
the UK. Executive Chairman Gwam Rajiah says the
firm is unique in its ability to deliver a full range of regulated
neurophysiology services outside specialist NHS centres. Gwam
also explains that Bespoke is the only independent provider of
dedicated intraoperative monitoring services, which are used by
surgeons to minimise risks during complex surgery. Gwam talks
about Bespoke’s community-focused healthcare model and how
his team continues to expand.
We founded Bespoke Healthcare in 2006 in response to the lack of nerve conduction
studies available in Lancashire, where we are based. Patients were waiting long
periods and often had to travel considerable distances to be tested. We recognised
a need for a service which is delivered locally, safely, ethically and on time, with a
transparent pricing structure which would benefit our NHSpartners.
Using only highly renowned consultants, we deliver our services through clinics
based in local hospitals. Having established our reputation in the north west, we
sought partnerships across the country and we have now seen over 175,000
patients for leading NHS establishments nationwide, from Nottingham and Oxford
to London, Surrey and Cornwall.
A community-based healthcare model
We’re not in competition with these NHS trusts; we work with them to reduce
waiting times and improve patient experiences. Medicine has always been extremely
FACTS ABOUT
BESPOKE HEALTHCARE
»Executive Chairman:
Gwam C. Rajiah
»Operations Director: SaraRajiah
»Established in 2006
»Based in Preston
»Services: Independent provider
of nerve conduction studies,
neurophysiology and IOM
services
»No. of employees: 80
»CQC: “Outstanding”
»IQIPS recommended
»Health and Care Business
Award winner, Red Rose
Business Awards 2018.
Bespoke Healthcare
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
56 | BESPOKE HEALTHCARE
Delivering a community-based
healthcare model
Executive Chairman
GwamC.Rajiah
Operations Director
SaraRajiah
Bespoke Healthcare is the leading independent provider of
nerve conduction study tests for NHS hospitals throughout
the UK. Executive Chairman Gwam Rajiah says the
firm is unique in its ability to deliver a full range of regulated
neurophysiology services outside specialist NHS centres. Gwam
also explains that Bespoke is the only independent provider of
dedicated intraoperative monitoring services, which are used by
surgeons to minimise risks during complex surgery. Gwam talks
about Bespoke’s community-focused healthcare model and how
his team continues to expand.
We founded Bespoke Healthcare in 2006 in response to the lack of nerve conduction
studies available in Lancashire, where we are based. Patients were waiting long
periods and often had to travel considerable distances to be tested. We recognised
a need for a service which is delivered locally, safely, ethically and on time, with a
transparent pricing structure which would benefit our NHSpartners.
Using only highly renowned consultants, we deliver our services through clinics
based in local hospitals. Having established our reputation in the north west, we
sought partnerships across the country and we have now seen over 175,000
patients for leading NHS establishments nationwide, from Nottingham and Oxford
to London, Surrey and Cornwall.
A community-based healthcare model
We’re not in competition with these NHS trusts; we work with them to reduce
waiting times and improve patient experiences. Medicine has always been extremely
FACTS ABOUT
BESPOKE HEALTHCARE
»Executive Chairman:
GwamC.Rajiah
»Operations Director: SaraRajiah
»Established in 2006
»Based in Preston
»Services: Independent provider
of nerve conduction studies,
neurophysiology and IOM
services
»No. of employees: 80
»CQC: “Outstanding”
»IQIPS recommended
»Health and Care Business
Award winner, Red Rose
Business Awards 2018.
Bespoke Healthcare
57BESPOKE HEALTHCARE |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
conservative when it comes to patient
pathways. Science and treatments move
on, but the model of care delivery has
largely stayed the same, with patients
having to travel to a select few, large
centres for diagnosis and treatment.
We are underpinned by the founding
principle that patients should be seen
in their local area. Challenging the
status quo, we deliver a community-
based healthcare model which is
benefiting the NHS and its patients.
In 2014, building on the success of
our neurophysiology work, we opened
Greater Lancashire Hospital, the only
independent family-owned hospital
in Lancashire. Here, working with the
region’s leading consultants, we offer
outpatient and diagnostic services
across several disciplines including
cardiology, physiotherapy, women’s
health, ophthalmology, ENT, urology
and vascular medicine.
Working with our NHS partners, we
treat patients locally in consultant-led
clinics, supported by a professional
nursing staff and underpinned
by strict clinical governance.
Crucially,wecharge at below tariff
for these services, helping hospitals
reduce waiting times, meet targets and
avoid financial penalties. Nevertheless,
we operate at a profit, enabling us
to continue investing and to support
charitable causes locally and overseas.
Committed to excellence in
patient care
Ultimately, though, what we wish
to be judged upon is our standard
of patient care. Our commitment to
a pricing structure which benefits
rather than penalises our NHS partners
would be futile if it compromised the
quality of our service. The systems
we have in place, to ensure clinical
safety and the highest standards of
care, must be robust, monitored and
continuouslyimproved.
We constantly assess risks and
scrutinise our policies and procedures.
Confident as we are in our risk
mitigation processes, we actively
seek affirmation of this from third
parties. We’re the only hospital
in Lancashire to have received an
“outstanding” rating for patient care
from the Care Quality Commission
and, more importantly, the only UK
private organisation to volunteer for
Improving Quality in Physiological
Services accreditation.
IQIPS is an extremely robust
accreditation system for delivering
neurophysiology services, including
the highly complex IOM. Currently, it
is not mandatory, but we considered
it a necessary requirement as part of
our commitment to patient safety and
quality of care. Following a stringent,
two-year assessment, we have been
recommended for IQIPS accreditation.
Everything we do is driven by a
desire to deliver the highest-quality
community-based services. Huge, acute
NHS hospitals, the focus of healthcare
in our large towns and cities, have a
vital and life-saving role to play in the
health of our communities and we act
as a pressure valve, freeing up their
valuable time and resources to treat
acute patients. We believe strongly Patient care has been
rated as “outstanding”
by the CQC
Everything we
do is driven by
a desire to
deliver the
highest-quality
community-
based services
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
58 | BESPOKE HEALTHCARE
Review of
Parliament
Thousands gathered
in Parliament Square
to celebrate the UK’s
departure from the EU
“We’re out”
“The British people have spoken,” said the
affable BBC anchorman, David Dimbleby,
“and the answer is: we’reout.”
This was just after 5am on the morning
of Friday, June 24, 2016.
In the end, it took three years, seven
months, seven days and eighteen hours.
It took three prime ministers. Two general
elections. It took, shock-of-shocks,
two
hosts of the BBC’s Question Time. Yes,
dear old Dimbleby himself, who had
chaired that veritable feast of Thursday-
night verbal flagellation since 1994, left
the hotseat a full year before Britain finally
left the European Union. But it did happen.
At 11pm on January 31, 2020, Britain
ceased to be an EU country. The EU was
now comprised of 27 member states rather
than 28. And although, with a transition
period in place, little else of substance
had changed, there was no doubting the
historic significance of the moment.
Addressing the nation from Downing
Street, the prime minister spoke of the
dawn of a new era and the potential for
meaningful and far reaching change:
“This is not an end but a beginning. This
is the moment the dawn breaks and
the curtain goes up on a new act in our
great nationaldrama.”
He spoke about the opportunities
this moment would provide, such as
controlling immigration, creating free
ports, “liberating” our fishing industry,
doing free trade deals or “simply making
our rules and laws for the benefit of the
people of this country.”
A cricket ball’s throw away in Parliament
Square, thousands gathered for a Brexit
party, fronted by The Brexit Party. This
nascent political grouping, not yet a
year old, appeared pretty pleased with
themselves as they swayed and crooned
with the crowd. In winning May’s
European elections, they had precipitated
Theresa May’s departure, ensured her
successor was a paid-up Leave supporter,
and had helped make Brexit a reality.
In a statement, MrsMay declared that
“after more than three years, we can
finally say we have delivered on the
result of the 2016 referendum and have
kept faith with the Britishpeople.”
Outgoing Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn
said: “Britain’s place in the world will
change. The question is what direction
we now take. Wecan build a truly
internationalist, diverse and outward-
looking Britain. Or we can turn inwards,
and trade our principles, rights and
standards to secure hastily arranged,
one-sided, race-to-the-bottom trade
deals with Donald Trump and others.”
Speaking for the EU, Michel Barnier
expressed his sadness, while Donald Tusk
said: “My dear British friends. We were, we
are, and we will always be a community.
And no Brexit will ever change that.”
And so with a mix of jubilation,
apprehension and sadness, the words
spoken by David Dimbleby in the early
hours of June 24, 2016 were now a
reality. We were out.
that 80 to 90 per cent of routine,
diagnostic work can, and should, be
done elsewhere.
We have encountered many obstacles
along our journey, from a basic
unwillingness to outsource, to
being dismissed as “cloth-capped
northerners”. Undeterred, we have built
a service which has earned the trust of
our NHS partners and is recommended
by local clinical commissioning groups
across the UK. We are seen by many of
our competitors as the standard bearers.
Expanding our support
We adopt a prudent approach to
financial management, as only a strong
financial position enables us to invest
further in the people and technology
required to deliver best practice. At the
time of writing, liquidity is healthy with
consolidated net assets of around £2.2
million, and we are progressing with
the next stage of development.
At Greater Lancashire Hospital, we’ve
recently opened the county’s first clinic
to deliver integrated women’s health,
gynaecology and fertility services
and embarked upon an ambitious
expansion to more than double the
hospital’s size. This will widen our
range of services and provide our first
general anaesthetic facility, enabling us
to support more complex procedures.
We recognise that the NHS operates
in an ever-changing landscape and
believe we are perfectly positioned
to adapt to its needs through our
pioneering approach to community-
based healthcare of exceptional
quality. We have demonstrated how
our model, delivered under strict
clinical governance, can achieve far-
reaching benefits in terms of improved
patient experiences, reduced waiting
times and enhanced cost efficiencies
for an overstretched NHS.
This model should be used more
widely. However, particularly in
relation to neurophysiology services,
all practitioners should be CQC-
registered and fully assessed by
a recognised, mandatory and
enforceable accreditation process. This
is the only way to ensure patient safety
and to be confident in the integrity
and professionalism of the services
beingdelivered.
We have built
a service
which has
earned the
trust of our
NHS partners
across the UK
Bespoke Healthcare
opened the Greater
Lancashire Hospital in
2014

www.bespokehealthcare.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Bespoke Healthcare. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development