British Lung Foundation

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by British Lung Foundation's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from British Lung Foundation is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.blf.org.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
20 | CW+
and neonatal intensive care units at
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital,
that will provide lifesaving care to
2,000 critically ill adults and babies
each year.
To continue this development, we have
been working in partnership with the
trust to establish CW Innovation – a
new programme designed to attract
and embed new medical technologies,
systems and healthcare models to
support the care of our patients.
This initiative has built a pipeline of
over 70 live innovation projects, in
areas including maternity, dementia
care, surgery and robotic process
automation. It is now our intention
to build on the initial success of
this programme by establishing the
trust as a proactive “test and scale”
environment for the latest medical
innovations sourced from both UK and
international markets. Our approach
sees a dedicated group of embedded
innovation managers working in
tandem with healthcare companies,
medical entrepreneurs and our own
front-line clinical staff to introduce,
embed and evaluate new systems and
technologies. Our aim is to improve
patient outcomes, patient experience
and operational efficiency across our
organisation and beyond.
An important role in an
exciting future
The role of hospitals in our communities
is changing. The metaphorical high
walls are coming down and we are
being expected to be both an anchor
point and an active participant in the
lives of the communities we serve. We
believe the reach of NHS charities like
ours has an important role to play in
this evolving landscape.
At a national level, the NHS is
increasingly recognising the value of its
charities and the difference they can
make to their beneficiary partners. For
the foreseeable future, the demand on
NHS charities will continue to grow.
This is no bad thing.
The public view of the NHS in
its 71st year remains immensely
positive. Our job is to capture and
channel that positivity and act as
a conduit for those people and
organisations wanting to help or
work with us to make things better
for patients, families and staff. It is an
exciting challenge and an important
responsibility and if we get it right, the
opportunities to advance the way we
deliver healthcare in and out of our
hospitals will be significant.
The public
view of the
NHS in its
71styear
remains
immensely
positive. Our
job is to
capture and
channel that
positivity
The “Mum & Baby” app – one of many staff-led innovation
programmes, part of the CW Innovation programme
Violin workshop with
a young patient, part
of the CW+ arts for All
programme
21BRITISH LUNG FOUNDATION |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
Former Chief Executive Dr Penny
Woods
The British Lung Foundation
supports ground-breaking
research into areas including
chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease, mesothelioma and
children’s lungs
The average person takes up to 20 breaths a minute, more
than eight million a year: a huge amount of work for the
lungs. Former Chief Executive Penny Woods says that
despite the essential role of these organs, respiratory medicine
has lagged far behind other areas such as heart disease and
cancer. She tells
The Parliamentary Review
how one in five
people have a lung condition and millions more could be
diagnosed with one in the future. The British Lung Foundation
was founded in 1985 with the aim of ensuring that, one day,
everyone will breathe clean air with healthy lungs.
Respiratory disease is the third-biggest cause of death in England after cancer and
cardiovascular disease. The economic burden of asthma and chronic obstructive
pulmonary disease on the NHS has been estimated as £4.9 billion a year. Taken
together, all lung conditions, including lung cancer, cost the NHS £11billion a year.
These are shocking statistics, but we’ve risen to this challenge. In the past 30 years,
we’ve spent more than £33 million on research, searching for better treatments for
diseases such as COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and mesothelioma.
Leading research efforts
It was the contrast between the poor state of funding for respiratory research and
the huge numbers of deaths from lung disease that inspired Professor Sir Malcolm
Green to create the BLF.
FACTS ABOUT
BRITISH LUNG FOUNDATION
»Former Chief Executive:
DrPenny Woods
»Established in 1985
»Headquartered in London with
offices in Cardiff, Glasgow and
Liverpool, as well as a UK-
wide network of Breathe Easy
support groups
»Services: Championing the
importance of respiratory medicine
»No. of employees:
Approximately 100
»In 30 years we’ve spent more
than £30 million
»Our helpline answers more than
20,000 callsa year
»Major projects: Providing the
Taskforce for Lung Health
secretariat, campaigning for
cleaner air, extending our Clean
Air Parents’ Network, fighting
for well-funded, effective stop-
smoking support
British Lung
Foundation
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22 | BRITISH LUNG FOUNDATION
Lung disease receives less than two
per cent of the overall research spend
despite its huge human and economic
cost. Just £31 million was invested
in respiratory research across the
UK in 2014. Infectious diseases, for
example, are responsible for about half
the burden on society of respiratory
conditions but receive about seven
times more research funding.
Underfunded and ignored
It’s a question of equality, too.
Incidence of and mortality rates
from lung disease are higher in
disadvantaged groups and areas of
social deprivation. Someone from the
most deprived section of society is two
and a half times more likely to have
COPD, and nearly twice as likely to
develop lung cancer, as someone from
the least deprived.
The most deprived communities are
exposed to more air pollution, live in
poorer housing conditions, have higher
smoking rates and are more likely to
be exposed to occupational hazards,
increasing the risk of lung disease.
The huge danger to the country’s
lungs from air pollution is why we
plan to bring MPs and peers together
with the health care professionals and
patients who deal with the damaging
effects of toxic air every day at an
event in parliament in 2020.
Creating a voice for lung
health
Lung disease needed a strong, unified
voice. As a result, last year the BLF
brought together some of the most
influential voices in UK health, creating
the Taskforce for Lung Health.
The Taskforce is made up of 30
members, including patients,
healthcare professionals, the voluntary
sector and professional associations.
An industries forum, which works
alongside the Taskforce, includes
representatives from pharmaceutical
and diagnostic device companies.
The Taskforce has had a major impact
in a short time. Already, NHS England
have announced that lung health will
be a priority area for the first time.
Despite this, there is still a long way
togo.
Since the EU referendum, the UK has
faced an uncertain political climate.
Brexit has dominated the minds of
the public, politicians and the media.
The BLF will work hard to ensure
that pledges made to give respiratory
medicine the profile it deserves are
not forgotten and that they become a
reality, whatever the political changes.
The British Lung
Foundation’s Adam
Haworth guides journalist
Martin Barrow through
an online version of
the Taskforce for Lung
Health’s five-year plan at
a parliamentary reception
The British Lung
Foundation offers help
and information for
people with lung disease
through its website and
telephone helpline
Lung disease
needed a
strong, unified
voice
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | BRITISH LUNG FOUNDATION
Lung disease receives less than two
per cent of the overall research spend
despite its huge human and economic
cost. Just £31 million was invested
in respiratory research across the
UK in 2014. Infectious diseases, for
example, are responsible for about half
the burden on society of respiratory
conditions but receive about seven
times more research funding.
Underfunded and ignored
It’s a question of equality, too.
Incidence of and mortality rates
from lung disease are higher in
disadvantaged groups and areas of
social deprivation. Someone from the
most deprived section of society is two
and a half times more likely to have
COPD, and nearly twice as likely to
develop lung cancer, as someone from
the least deprived.
The most deprived communities are
exposed to more air pollution, live in
poorer housing conditions, have higher
smoking rates and are more likely to
be exposed to occupational hazards,
increasing the risk of lung disease.
The huge danger to the country’s
lungs from air pollution is why we
plan to bring MPs and peers together
with the health care professionals and
patients who deal with the damaging
effects of toxic air every day at an
event in parliament in 2020.
Creating a voice for lung
health
Lung disease needed a strong, unified
voice. As a result, last year the BLF
brought together some of the most
influential voices in UK health, creating
the Taskforce for Lung Health.
The Taskforce is made up of 30
members, including patients,
healthcare professionals, the voluntary
sector and professional associations.
An industries forum, which works
alongside the Taskforce, includes
representatives from pharmaceutical
and diagnostic device companies.
The Taskforce has had a major impact
in a short time. Already, NHS England
have announced that lung health will
be a priority area for the first time.
Despite this, there is still a long way
togo.
Since the EU referendum, the UK has
faced an uncertain political climate.
Brexit has dominated the minds of
the public, politicians and the media.
The BLF will work hard to ensure
that pledges made to give respiratory
medicine the profile it deserves are
not forgotten and that they become a
reality, whatever the political changes.
The British Lung
Foundation’s Adam
Haworth guides journalist
Martin Barrow through
an online version of
the Taskforce for Lung
Health’s five-year plan at
a parliamentary reception
The British Lung
Foundation offers help
and information for
people with lung disease
through its website and
telephone helpline
Lung disease
needed a
strong, unified
voice
23BRITISH LUNG FOUNDATION |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
The lack of focus on respiratory
medicine is not new or just the result
of Brexit soaking up the column
inches. Despite the huge numbers of
lives lost each year due to respiratory
disease, those illnesses simply don’t
have the same public profile as heart
disease, cancer or dementia.
Breathlessness – a symptom of many
lung diseases – can be a debilitating
struggle, leaving people unable to
dress or even leave the house. It’s a
struggle that largely goes unseen.
Too many people assume the victims
of lung disease are “undeserving of
help” and this can leave those with
a lung condition at risk of isolation,
depression and anxiety. In fact, around
15 per cent of the 46,000 people
diagnosed with lung cancer and 20 per
cent of people diagnosed with COPD
every year have neversmoked.
The burden of disease is higher in
people who are poorer, older or both.
This demographic is also less likely to
attract high-spending newspaper and
TV advertisers and so is of less interest
to many newspaper editors, television
producers and social influencers. For
many, their lung disease is chronic
and progressive, so their ill health
can make it difficult for them to tell
theirstory.
Working in collaboration
Each member of the Taskforce has
been working hard towards their own
priority areas with great success, but
working as a collective and adapting
individual goals to service the bigger
picture can sometimes seem as hard as
going it alone.
The Taskforce, working alongside
the NHS and the government, has an
unparalleled opportunity to transform
respiratory care, but we still need more
collaboration. We want to work with
politicians from all parties, the media,
academics and everyone affected by
lung disease, to build a country where
everyone can breathe clean air with
healthy lungs.
Too many
people
assume the
victims of lung
disease are
‘undeserving
of help’
The Taskforce for Lung
Health celebrated the
launch of its five-
year plan to improve
England’s respiratory
health at Westminster

www.blf.org.uk

This article was sponsored by British Lung Foundation. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development