Brooke Action for Working Horses & Donkeys

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Brooke Action for Working Horses & Donkeys's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Brooke Action for Working Horses & Donkeys is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.thebrooke.org

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
14 | SILVERBACK FILMS
Our business
The wildlife television business had
remained very stable for the past
20 years, but now it is changing
very rapidly. In the past, television
channels provided the time slots
for programmes and subsequently
international sales to different
territories generated significant
revenues. The global streaming services
of Netflix, and others like Disney Plus,
are rapidly changing the pre-existing
business model, making traditional
channels financially vulnerable.
A benefit of the changing television
landscape has been a huge growth
in commissioning of wildlife films.
Four years ago, gaining commissions
was the major hurdle, but now there
is an abundance of opportunities.
However, the rapid growth has led
to huge competition for a very small
and highly specialised talent base.
Maintaining what is undeniably the
very high-quality output to date will be
a significant challenge.
Our challenges
The rapidly developing environmental
crisis caused by both climate change
and loss of the natural world is a major
focus for Silverback Films. Through our
work, we engage with a wide range of
scientists, who without exception, are
increasingly desperate about the crisis
they see unfolding and the lack of
action at present to prevent it.
Furthermore, when filming, our teams
consistently witness how the stability
of our world is being rocked, often
with devastating consequences. The
public at large still remain largely
unaware of these significant changes
and so are sleepwalking into the
greatest disaster in human history.
To date, communicating the
scientific causes and cures of our
predicament within wildlife films has
largely failed to produce change.
Our mission at Silverback is to
address this and try to rectify this
while continuing to entertain our
audience. As audiences develop this
understanding, filmmaking styles
will inevitably change, and the more
traditional wildlife films may soon
appear irrelevant to the realities of our
changing world.
Consequently, this year Silverback
Films has striven to play its part in
driving global change. We presented
the
Our Planet
series with Sir David
Attenborough at The World Economic
Forum in Davos, the International
Monetary Fund and to the World Bank,
communicating to world leaders the
importance of having a healthy natural
world and the significance of keeping
our world healthy for us.
2020 is rapidly becoming the “last
chance to save the planet” with the
last opportunities to make many crucial
global environmental decisions. In
2020, Silverback Films is partnering
with the WWF, the World Economic
Forum and the BBC to use our
filmmaking skills in order to create
a number of clear and commanding
productions. We hope this reinforces
the urgent need for changes that only
our influential global audience in their
powerful positions can make happen.
2020 is rapidly
becoming the
“last chance
to save the
planet” with
the last
opportunities
to make many
crucial global
environmental
decisions
Our Planet
producer
Sophie Lanfear face-to-
face with a walrus in the
Russian Arctic
15BROOKE ACTION FOR WORKING HORSES & DONKEYS |
ENVIRONMENT, FOOD & RURAL AFFAIRS
Chief Executive Petra Ingram
Donkeys play a huge role in water
provision to millions of households
and small-scale farms
Brooke has been improving the lives of vulnerable working
horses, donkeys and mules – as well as the communities
that depend on them – for more than 85 years. CEO
Petra Ingram tells
The Parliamentary Review
that the animal
welfare charity operates across some of the world’s most
challenging areas working directly with 1.7 million animals and
1.1 million owners, with millions more benefiting as Brooke
training, empowerment and system change ripples through
whole countries. With more than 600 staff members across the
globe, the Brooke team includes vets, animal welfare experts
and development specialists. Petra talks at greater length about
Brooke’s work.
Standing in the remote mountains of Pakistan, I witnessed the inseparable
dependency that some people have on the endless efforts of their working animal.
I saw heavily laden donkeys, heaving with the heat and effort of lugging coal from
the deep mountain mines: side by side with their owner, equally hot, their eyes
red and sore from the dust, returning exhausted from their final trip that day, both
desperate for water and rest.
For 85 years, we have been working around the world, improving the welfare of
working horses, donkeys and mules, whose labour provides sufficient income to
lift a family out of poverty. Just five years ago we discovered these mines, where
donkeys and people work in unimaginable conditions: all invisible to the world,
experiencing endless suffering each and every day.
FACTS ABOUT
BROOKE ACTION FOR WORKING
HORSES & DONKEYS
»Chief Executive: Petra Ingram
»Established in 1934
»Based in London
»Services: Raising awareness
and providing support for
equids across the globe
»No. of employees: 600
Brooke Action for Working
Horses & Donkeys
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | BROOKE ACTION FOR WORKING HORSES & DONKEYS
We employ local people. To engage
the coal mine’s vulnerable, migratory
workforce, we deployed our animal
health and welfare team from the area
where the miners came from. Sharing
dialect and cultural understanding, the
team was quickly accepted, initially
providing emergency care, and over
time building an infrastructure with
the local government to support
the donkeys, and the people whose
livelihood depends on them.
Our global reach
We are a UK charity with over 500
staff in 11 developing countries in
Asia, Africa, the Middle East and
Central America. Working with local
partners and community organisations,
we improve the welfare of working
horses, donkeys and mules, who are a
lifeline to people living in poverty.
Established by an inspirational British
woman, Dorothy Brooke, rescuing
former war horses working in Cairo,
the charity has grown to become an
international lifesaver. The animals
are worked to and from the market
carrying produce, or operating as taxis,
as traction in waste management, and
also in construction, carrying sand,
stones or bricks. A working equid is
vital to the whole family. For women
around the world, they reduce the time
and effort spent on daily household
chores, carrying water and firewood,
often over many kilometres.
Highlighting hidden issues
Across Afghanistan, India, Nepal and
Pakistan, only 640 of the estimated
150,000 kilns in South Asia are partly or
fully mechanised. Over 500,000 animals
support the human workforce. With
the rapid growth in southern Asia’s
population and industry, the scale of
brick manufacturing is expected to
increase and its impact toworsen.
To extend beyond the 8,500 brick
kilns we currently work in, we
partnered with the International Labour
Organization, SAIEVAC and Donkey
Sanctuary, convening a multidisciplinary
group to address the interdependent
issues of working animal welfare,
child and bonded labour, and the
environmental impacts of a largely
unregulated and hidden industry.
This shared agenda enables more
stakeholders to benefit. The initiative
has attracted more organisations,
including WWF and Action Aid, to
develop collective policy and to build
momentum for realisticchange.
In 2017 Brooke secured
acknowledgment with the UN
Committee on Food Security of
working equids as livestock, a hugely
significant step that created a platform
to highlight the vital economic
contribution of working animals.
Further, Brooke’s consultative status
with UN ECOSOC enabled us to hold
a side event at the High Level Political
Forum in July 2019. Working in coalition
A miner working with
a donkey in the remote
coal mines of Pakistan
earns about £1.50 a day
Working with
local partners
and
community
organisations,
we improve
the welfare of
working
horses,
donkeys and
mules
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | BROOKE ACTION FOR WORKING HORSES & DONKEYS
We employ local people. To engage
the coal mine’s vulnerable, migratory
workforce, we deployed our animal
health and welfare team from the area
where the miners came from. Sharing
dialect and cultural understanding, the
team was quickly accepted, initially
providing emergency care, and over
time building an infrastructure with
the local government to support
the donkeys, and the people whose
livelihood depends on them.
Our global reach
We are a UK charity with over 500
staff in 11 developing countries in
Asia, Africa, the Middle East and
Central America. Working with local
partners and community organisations,
we improve the welfare of working
horses, donkeys and mules, who are a
lifeline to people living in poverty.
Established by an inspirational British
woman, Dorothy Brooke, rescuing
former war horses working in Cairo,
the charity has grown to become an
international lifesaver. The animals
are worked to and from the market
carrying produce, or operating as taxis,
as traction in waste management, and
also in construction, carrying sand,
stones or bricks. A working equid is
vital to the whole family. For women
around the world, they reduce the time
and effort spent on daily household
chores, carrying water and firewood,
often over many kilometres.
Highlighting hidden issues
Across Afghanistan, India, Nepal and
Pakistan, only 640 of the estimated
150,000 kilns in South Asia are partly or
fully mechanised. Over 500,000 animals
support the human workforce. With
the rapid growth in southern Asia’s
population and industry, the scale of
brick manufacturing is expected to
increase and its impact toworsen.
To extend beyond the 8,500 brick
kilns we currently work in, we
partnered with the International Labour
Organization, SAIEVAC and Donkey
Sanctuary, convening a multidisciplinary
group to address the interdependent
issues of working animal welfare,
child and bonded labour, and the
environmental impacts of a largely
unregulated and hidden industry.
This shared agenda enables more
stakeholders to benefit. The initiative
has attracted more organisations,
including WWF and Action Aid, to
develop collective policy and to build
momentum for realisticchange.
In 2017 Brooke secured
acknowledgment with the UN
Committee on Food Security of
working equids as livestock, a hugely
significant step that created a platform
to highlight the vital economic
contribution of working animals.
Further, Brooke’s consultative status
with UN ECOSOC enabled us to hold
a side event at the High Level Political
Forum in July 2019. Working in coalition
A miner working with
a donkey in the remote
coal mines of Pakistan
earns about £1.50 a day
Working with
local partners
and
community
organisations,
we improve
the welfare of
working
horses,
donkeys and
mules
17BROOKE ACTION FOR WORKING HORSES & DONKEYS |
ENVIRONMENT, FOOD & RURAL AFFAIRS
with other equine charities and United
Nations Permanent Mission of Senegal,
we highlighted the contribution of
working livestock to the Sustainable
Development Goals. A farmer in
Afghanistan explained the role of his
equid: his chicken, sheep, goat and cow
are like the fingers of his hand, and the
donkey his thumb. Without his thumb,
his hand couldn’t function.
Working equids are not food-producing
animals but they are a vital component
of livestock and farming systems. Now,
due to our work, the UN is starting
to recognise this: animals and their
welfare are a sustainable development
issue and need recognition in the
indicators to the goals.
Equids: an asset not a tool
Historically, working equids have been
invisible, their economic contribution
unrecognised; they are excluded from
local policies and the infrastructure
for their care is limited. Veterinarians
qualify without learning how to treat
them and prevent disease. We are
catalysing change by evidencing the
relevance of these animals to the One
Health concept and strengthening local
infrastructures to ensure providers of
key services have the skills they need.
We are improving access to medicines
via government-led sustainable drug
funds and responsible pharmacological
use. Farriers are trained, curricula
are enhanced, vets and para-vets are
mentored and better harnesses are
designed with local tradesmen. We
are even working with the younger
generation of school children to build
compassion for animals and ensure
they have basic handling skills which
will stay with them forever.
Using robust evidence, we help
local business innovate, and enable
equine-owning communities to thrive,
ensuring the value of the equid is
appreciated as an asset not a tool. For
example, a women’s market gardening
initiative in Burkina Faso has found
donkey dung fertiliser to be more
beneficial to their produce than regular
fertiliser. In India, hydroponically
grown fodder ensures nutritious feed
for animals in drought-prone regions
and income when the surplus is sold.
One of our biggest concerns is the
growing cross-border trade of donkey
skins for traditional Chinese medicines
such as eijao, which uses gelatine in
donkey hide. Demand is outstripping
supply and Chinese donkey farms cannot
keep up, so donkeys are being sold or
stolen and slaughtered acrossAfrica.
Not only is this a huge welfare issue
due to poor transport and slaughter
standards, but it is also devastating for
African families, who depend on their
donkey for everyday life. The lifetime
value of a donkey far outweighs any
cash received at sale, and the increase
in cross-border smuggling is leading to
disease outbreaks. The epicentre for
trade is now in Kenya and in response
to cries for help from the local
communities, we are taking action.
Working with local people, with district
and national governments and with
other like-minded organisations, we
will continue to strive to effect positive
change for these animals and for the
people who depend on them.
A working
equid is vital
to the whole
family
The vital role of working
livestock in food security
was recognised by the
UN in 2016 thanks to
Brooke

www.thebrooke.org

This article was sponsored by Brooke Action for Working Horses & Donkeys. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development