Care More

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Care More's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Care More is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.care-more.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
50 | COMPASSIONATE CARE TEAM
Innovation and education
Staff retention has always been a
challenge in home care. We prioritise
listening to our staff and involving
their views and have found that
encouraging them to be more involved
has been a real positive for us this year.
Another challenge we face is moving
to digital technology. The generation
we care for today are not technically
minded and find technology
frustrating and intrusive. We have
had to be creative and innovative in
implementing digital technology to
enhance quality.
Electronic care planning, risk assessing
and MAR chart completion enable
staff to have information from previous
visits to hand. Incidents can be resolved
immediately, and all the information
is cloud-based, secure and instantly
accessible. Digital technology is more
efficient, meaning staff are able to
focus on the service user rather than
spending time completing paperwork.
Reviewing the future
We created a key worker post giving
staff a caseload to manage by carrying
out three-monthly reviews, completing
risk assessments and observing a
small team of staff in medication
administration and carrying out their
duties, using a pay rise as an incentive.
Delivery of this position has provided
a real positive outlook for the business
in ensuring quality of care has been
maintained and staff retention in
the last six months has improved
significantly. This is something we will
maintain and continue to develop.
In the future we hope to expand in
Newark and Sherwood, and possibly
even Mansfield. The playing field will
change as and when we expand.
At
Compassionate
Care Team we
recognise that
great care starts
with great staff
– that’s why we
offer all our staff
regular training
and 24-hour
access to their
training
profiles
Office Administrator
Zoe Bennett (left) and
Assistant Manager
Jasmine Brett-Goodwin
(right)
51CARE MORE |
CARE
Managing Director Prash Patel
We place considerable
importance on customer
service and loyalty
Managing Director Prash Patel says Care More’s
homecare service helps users through the day with
“ease and comfort”. He says the company puts the
customer first – every time – and looks to provide a standard
of care that the Care More team would want for their own
families. He tells
The Parliamentary Review
that quality
assurance and customer satisfaction drive everything they do,
and explains how this filters into every level of his team’s work.
Here at Care More we operate in a slightly different way to other domiciliary care
providers. Our company is split into two distinct halves. On the one hand we
provide care for people in their own homes, and on the other we provide nurses
and carers to nursing homes as and when required.
I started Care More as I believed I could make a meaningful difference to the care
industry. My own background in the high street, with over 20 years of owning
and running retail businesses, meant that we placed considerable importance
on customer service and loyalty. We believe that the way in which we treat the
customer is absolutely fundamental to how we operate. Our priority is to ensure
that whoever we are treating gets exceptional service, above and beyond what is
considered normal for the industry.
The early days of the business demanded a great deal of work, and initially I
worked 18-hour days, seven days a week. Working tirelessly to ensure the business
succeeded allowed me to learn exactly what I needed to do.
FACTS ABOUT
CARE MORE
»Managing Director: Prash Patel
»Founded in 2015
»Located in Surrey
»Services: Domiciliary care
provider and care agency
»No. of employees: 51
Care More
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
52 | CARE MORE
We opened at the end of 2015,
with an annual turnover of around
£110,000. This year our turnover is
£2.5 million. Our branches in Sutton
and Croydon are supported by 52
domiciliary carers, over 100 bank staff
and 151 customers.
A company of two halves
Having bought ourselves out of a
franchise, we made the decision to
split the company in two this year.
This allowed us to distinguish the
supply of staff for care homes from
the domiciliary care we provide. The
decision to separate the two has
motivated the staff in the two separate
companies and allows them to work in
line with their own systems. By using
their own equipment and working
in their own space, they are able to
provide precisely the kind of service
their specific role requires.
We recognise the fact that there is
a huge demand for providers like us
to offer care in people’s own homes.
We appreciate the way in which sub-
standard care can impact the entire
industry by damaging the reputation
of more reputable care providers,
which we consider ourselves to be.
As such, we recognise the importance
of investing in our staff and paying
our carers well, supplying some with
cars to ensure they provide the best
possible quality of care they can.
Industry challenges
There are a number of challenges
within our industry and the first we
face is recruiting staff. The skills gap
impacts us, and due to the fact a
number of our carers visit people in
their homes, it is preferable they are
able to drive in order to move around
with ease. The majority of those we
service are within a five-mile radius,
which is simply too far to travel
without a vehicle of some kind. We
also require a level of flexibility that can
be challenging, and at times we need
our staff to end late and start early.
We also find cash flow a difficult issue.
In order to attract and maintain staff
we pay them on a weekly basis, and
during periods when we are paid late
as a company, this can create issues.
At a time when the cost of labour is
rising, we find ourselves increasingly
squeezed on all sides. This is coupled
with the fact that we do not get
paid for all the care we provide, as
In the future, we would
like to open more
branches
Our priority is
to ensure that
whoever we
are treating
gets
exceptional
service, above
and beyond
what is
considered
normal for the
industry
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
52 | CARE MORE
We opened at the end of 2015,
with an annual turnover of around
£110,000. This year our turnover is
£2.5 million. Our branches in Sutton
and Croydon are supported by 52
domiciliary carers, over 100 bank staff
and 151 customers.
A company of two halves
Having bought ourselves out of a
franchise, we made the decision to
split the company in two this year.
This allowed us to distinguish the
supply of staff for care homes from
the domiciliary care we provide. The
decision to separate the two has
motivated the staff in the two separate
companies and allows them to work in
line with their own systems. By using
their own equipment and working
in their own space, they are able to
provide precisely the kind of service
their specific role requires.
We recognise the fact that there is
a huge demand for providers like us
to offer care in people’s own homes.
We appreciate the way in which sub-
standard care can impact the entire
industry by damaging the reputation
of more reputable care providers,
which we consider ourselves to be.
As such, we recognise the importance
of investing in our staff and paying
our carers well, supplying some with
cars to ensure they provide the best
possible quality of care they can.
Industry challenges
There are a number of challenges
within our industry and the first we
face is recruiting staff. The skills gap
impacts us, and due to the fact a
number of our carers visit people in
their homes, it is preferable they are
able to drive in order to move around
with ease. The majority of those we
service are within a five-mile radius,
which is simply too far to travel
without a vehicle of some kind. We
also require a level of flexibility that can
be challenging, and at times we need
our staff to end late and start early.
We also find cash flow a difficult issue.
In order to attract and maintain staff
we pay them on a weekly basis, and
during periods when we are paid late
as a company, this can create issues.
At a time when the cost of labour is
rising, we find ourselves increasingly
squeezed on all sides. This is coupled
with the fact that we do not get
paid for all the care we provide, as
In the future, we would
like to open more
branches
Our priority is
to ensure that
whoever we
are treating
gets
exceptional
service, above
and beyond
what is
considered
normal for the
industry
53CARE MORE |
CARE
sometimes we are not sent written
confirmations of short-notice change
requests, which then lead to disputes
on payments which we always have to
concede and make a loss.
We also believe that the introduction
of Universal Credit has been to the
detriment of our service. In instances
where a carer is on this benefit, they
are only legally able to work 16 hours
a week before it is cut. This proves
an issue, especially when we consider
that parents on this benefit are already
unable to work on school holidays or
on weekends and can only work 16
hours a week while their children are
at school.
We are also impacted by the reduction
in social funding, which encourages
social services to cut call times and to
attempt to change double calls into
single ones. This puts additional strain
on our staff and does not provide
sufficient time for us to act in those
instances where an increase is required
for the safety of the customer.
The increasing age of our population
means that we require more complex
training for our staff in order to cope
with a variation in needs. Work that
was once the responsibility of district
nurses now falls to us, and, with no
additional funding provided, we are
not suitably compensated for this
change in role; however, we do take
on board that the councils are under
extreme financial pressures, and so we
take on these additional roles to better
our reputation and service levels to our
customers and bolster our relationships
with councils and CCGs.
Future plans
In the future, I hope to see us open
more branches, at least extending to
Surrey and Sussex.
We also hope to improve the work
we do in terms of efficiency, moving
towards an increasingly digital
workplace. Having already made the
transition to electronic monitoring,
we hope to expand our IT usage as
it advances, so that we can make
our services more efficient and
environmentally friendly.
Overall, our ambition lies in continuing
to provide the services we do at
present, maintaining our great
customer service and extending our
profile over the coming years.
We recognise
the importance
of investing in
our staff and
paying our
carers well,
supplying
somewith cars
to ensure they
provide the
best possible
quality of care
they can
Quality assurance and
customer satisfaction
drive everything

www.care-more.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Care More. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development