Chase Medical

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Chase Medical's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Chase Medical is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.chase-medical.com

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
10 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
Public Health England is due to issue
a report on prescription medication
addiction later this year. The Medicines
and Healthcare products Regulatory
Agency will be enforcing the packaging
rules. The Association of the British
Pharmaceutical Industry backed the
packaging move.
In a statement Deputy Chief Scientific
Officer Sheuli Porkess said: “When
opioids are prescribed as part of
managing a patient’s pain, the
packaging and labelling should be clear
and convey the risks of dependency.
“Pharmaceutical companies have
recommended that clearer warnings
are included on packaging, so these
changes are welcome and have our
fullsupport.
“We look forward to the conclusions
of the MHRA and PHE reviews, and will
fully engage with their findings.”
In 2018 a BBC investigation found
that in 2016/17 more than two million
working-age people in England had
taken a prescription painkiller that
had not been prescribed for them.
Parts of northern England had seen a
prescription rate of opioids four times
higher than in London. One and a half
million tramadol tablets were stolen
from a lorry last year, and the National
Crime Agency said some parts of the
northwest were manufacturing illicit
high-strength painkillers.
In the US legal cases against the
manufacturers of some opioids
are making their way through the
courts, with former addicts alleging
the industry improperly pushed the
drugs, leading to tens of thousands
ofdeaths.
Oklahoma has brought a multi-
billion-dollar lawsuit against one
company, saying its marketing tactics
misrepresented the risk of addiction
and drove prescription of the products
to patients that did not need them.
In Britain the challenge has been felt
by institutions that accepted donations
from a family accused of profiting from
the epidemic.
The Sackler family owns Purdue
Pharma, which makes OxyContin,
and has donated to UK galleries and
art museums including the Tate and
Victoria & Albert Museum.
However, the director of the V&A
defended accepting the donation.
Tristram Hunt told BBC Radio Four’s
Today
programme: “If we want our
cultural institutions to achieve a lot,
we also have to seek a broad range
of funders. We receive very generous
support from the Sackler family and
we’re grateful for that.
“We take all of these ethical issues
incredibly seriously, it goes to our audit
committee, we discuss it in detail.”
While plans to amend opioid packaging
with warnings were announced
earlier this year, there has not been
any further news on the issue as
The
Parliamentary Review
goes to print.
It would certainly be a shift for the
sector were it to go ahead – joining
the variety of issues discussed by this
year’s healthcare and pharmaceutical
representatives in the following best
practice articles.
Opioid packaging may
carry new warnings
regarding their potential
for abuse
11CHASE MEDICAL |
HEALTHCARE & PHARMACEUTICAL
Public Health England is due to issue
a report on prescription medication
addiction later this year. The Medicines
and Healthcare products Regulatory
Agency will be enforcing the packaging
rules. The Association of the British
Pharmaceutical Industry backed the
packaging move.
In a statement Deputy Chief Scientific
Officer Sheuli Porkess said: “When
opioids are prescribed as part of
managing a patient’s pain, the
packaging and labelling should be clear
and convey the risks of dependency.
“Pharmaceutical companies have
recommended that clearer warnings
are included on packaging, so these
changes are welcome and have our
fullsupport.
“We look forward to the conclusions
of the MHRA and PHE reviews, and will
fully engage with their findings.”
In 2018 a BBC investigation found
that in 2016/17 more than two million
working-age people in England had
taken a prescription painkiller that
had not been prescribed for them.
Parts of northern England had seen a
prescription rate of opioids four times
higher than in London. One and a half
million tramadol tablets were stolen
from a lorry last year, and the National
Crime Agency said some parts of the
northwest were manufacturing illicit
high-strength painkillers.
In the US legal cases against the
manufacturers of some opioids
are making their way through the
courts, with former addicts alleging
the industry improperly pushed the
drugs, leading to tens of thousands
ofdeaths.
Oklahoma has brought a multi-
billion-dollar lawsuit against one
company, saying its marketing tactics
misrepresented the risk of addiction
and drove prescription of the products
to patients that did not need them.
In Britain the challenge has been felt
by institutions that accepted donations
from a family accused of profiting from
the epidemic.
The Sackler family owns Purdue
Pharma, which makes OxyContin,
and has donated to UK galleries and
art museums including the Tate and
Victoria & Albert Museum.
However, the director of the V&A
defended accepting the donation.
Tristram Hunt told BBC Radio Four’s
Today
programme: “If we want our
cultural institutions to achieve a lot,
we also have to seek a broad range
of funders. We receive very generous
support from the Sackler family and
we’re grateful for that.
“We take all of these ethical issues
incredibly seriously, it goes to our audit
committee, we discuss it in detail.”
While plans to amend opioid packaging
with warnings were announced
earlier this year, there has not been
any further news on the issue as
The
Parliamentary Review
goes to print.
It would certainly be a shift for the
sector were it to go ahead – joining
the variety of issues discussed by this
year’s healthcare and pharmaceutical
representatives in the following best
practice articles.
Opioid packaging may
carry new warnings
regarding their potential
for abuse
Founder and Managing Director
Janine Ellis
Ensuring best practice is one
of our core commitments
Chase Medical was founded by Managing Director Janine Ellis
in 2010, initially specialising in recruiting nurse practitioners
for primary care, with a focus on assisting the admission
avoidance efforts in the sector. They are now the largest primary
care agency in the UK, working with 35 per cent of GP surgeries
nationwide. Their success has come from a proactive and intuitive
approach to staffing solutions. Janine and Senior Consultant
Elizabeth reflect on the challenges of the last year, how Chase
Medical have met these and their preparations for what’s to come.
We have remained specialists in primary care, and, due to demand, this has required
rapid expansion over the last nine years in order to supply nurse practitioners, practice
nurses, HCAs, GPs and clinical pharmacists where needed across the country.
Supporting primary care services
Over the past year, the mainstream press has been filled with headlines about the
state of the NHS, often raising alarming facts and figures about our busy hospitals,
such as statistics from A&E departments, which have seen unprecedented levels of
demand. An area that attracts far less attention is the strain on our primary care
sector and the work being done between sectors to reduce hospital admissions and
improve care provisions within communities.
We have been in the thick of it; our staff have been working hard in GP surgeries,
WICs, UCCs and community teams to ensure patient demand is met. One example
is the extended access projects, which were rolled out across the UK. While weekend
FACTS ABOUT
CHASE MEDICAL
»Founder and Managing
Director: Janine Ellis
»Located UK-wide
»Services: Primary care
recruitment
»No. of internal employees: 36
»No. of bank staff: Over 10,000
»No. of permanent candidates
placed: Over 1,000
»Vetting and compliance
procedure exceeds NHS
standard requirements
»The largest UK primary care
recruitment agency
»100 per cent adherence to
governing regulators; HMRC,
BIS, ICO, NMC and the CQC
»Fully IR35-compliant
Chase Medical
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
12 | CHASE MEDICAL
and evening appointments are
undoubtedly convenient for the patient,
initially the roll-out of these services
presented significant staffingchallenges.
We have been working with many of
the teams to ensure that while these
services are provided, the clinicians
involved do not suffer from burnout.
We’ve been proud to provide locums
to support these services, without
whom some of the services may not
have continued. By outsourcing the
recruitment, vetting, compliance checks
and management of locum staff to us,
the services have saved time, reduced
stress and ensuredsustainability.
We continue to be at the forefront
of introducing alternative advanced
clinicians into primary care, to step
into the gap left by our urgent GP
shortage. This year, on top of our
continued provisions to the many
centres who rely on us, we have
been at the forefront of integrating
independent pharmacist prescribers
into general practice. They bring
expertise in medicines management
– as well as their ability to run minor
illness clinics and reduce pressure on
GPs – into primary care, with fantastic
results. We’ve recruited more than 500
independent pharmacy prescribers to
date, and this number is set to grow as
they are increasingly recognised for the
contribution they can make.
The next five years in general
practice
As we have worked within primary
care across the UK for many years,
we are in a unique position. We
have both detailed knowledge of the
different challenges faced in specific
regions and an overview of the sector
as a whole, as well as experience
of managing staffing through the
changes the sector has already seen
over the last decade. We manage our
position responsibly – not only keeping
our finger on the pulse by tracking
changes, gathering information and
collating trends, but also being able to
reasonably pre-empt and pre-plan for
upcoming staffing requirements. This
influences our recruitment strategy to
ensure we are assisting efficiently and
effectively. So, what do we see as the
focus points for the next five years?
With ever-increasing demand, the
expansion of the workforce is of
paramount importance and will be the
key challenge for the NHS as a whole
over the next five to eight years. If not
managed effectively, the NHS itself is
at stake. Brexit risks a further decline in
the pool of clinicians available, so action
must be taken now. In general practice,
this means both recruiting and training
practice nurses and GPs, and further
integrating pharmacist prescribers and
nurse practitioners. Moving forward,
continued awareness of the capabilities
of these new staff and assistance for
centres in adjusting to current structures
(such as introducing streaming) so
they can reap the benefits of these
clinicians is imperative. At Chase
Medical, we will continue our work
with practice managers, GP partners
and CCGs, addressing specific shortfalls
and identifying the most suitable
clinician for each unique centre, in
terms of their existing team and their
patientdemographic.
Alternative staff are the
solution to a growing
shortage of GP appointments
in primary care
As we have
worked within
primary care
across the UK
for many
years, we are
in a unique
position
13CHASE MEDICAL |
HEALTHCARE & PHARMACEUTICAL
In order to maximise the capacity of
the NHS, we must also ensure the
retention of staff. Our ability to provide
flexible working has improved retention
of several staff groups – for example,
those clinicians reaching retirement,
who have been able to wind down
more gradually by moving to locum
work, rather than stopping completely,
which enables us to continue to
utilise this highly skilled portion of the
workforce. Additionally, return-to-work
training programmes have seen practice
nurses renew their registrations, and we
have been welcoming them back and
supporting them in their return. Our
focus here will be on continued help as
more of these schemes are rolled out
between now and 2024.
Always improving
We were pleased to hear of plans for
investment in the NHS at a primary
and community level to focus more on
prevention. Integrated care will be a
key element of this, and we are set to
assist with more extended access and
admission avoidance schemes. Bringing
forward our experience working with
large primary care service providers,
CCGs and practice groups, we will be
applying our expertise to help the new
primary care networks.
Retention is key internally, too, and with
over 30 per cent of our staff having
more than five years’ tenure with the
business, the level of knowledge is
high, and retention here remains a key
item on the agenda, year on year.
We invest heavily in our workforce
and in the business to continually
improve services to both candidates
and centres. This year, a new CRM
system has been implemented as part
of a digital innovation. This will see a
mobile shift-booking app launched in
the summer, which will enable staff
and clients to book and manage shifts
at the touch of a button.
There are many challenges ahead
in the sector, especially with Brexit
looming, but we are prepped and
ready to help tackle the growing
staffing crisis, with an enduring
commitment to finding innovative
ways to address the shortfall.
We invest
heavily in our
workforce and
in the business
to continually
improve services
to both
candidates and
centres
Planning for a way
forward
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
12 | CHASE MEDICAL
and evening appointments are
undoubtedly convenient for the patient,
initially the roll-out of these services
presented significant staffingchallenges.
We have been working with many of
the teams to ensure that while these
services are provided, the clinicians
involved do not suffer from burnout.
We’ve been proud to provide locums
to support these services, without
whom some of the services may not
have continued. By outsourcing the
recruitment, vetting, compliance checks
and management of locum staff to us,
the services have saved time, reduced
stress and ensuredsustainability.
We continue to be at the forefront
of introducing alternative advanced
clinicians into primary care, to step
into the gap left by our urgent GP
shortage. This year, on top of our
continued provisions to the many
centres who rely on us, we have
been at the forefront of integrating
independent pharmacist prescribers
into general practice. They bring
expertise in medicines management
– as well as their ability to run minor
illness clinics and reduce pressure on
GPs – into primary care, with fantastic
results. We’ve recruited more than 500
independent pharmacy prescribers to
date, and this number is set to grow as
they are increasingly recognised for the
contribution they can make.
The next five years in general
practice
As we have worked within primary
care across the UK for many years,
we are in a unique position. We
have both detailed knowledge of the
different challenges faced in specific
regions and an overview of the sector
as a whole, as well as experience
of managing staffing through the
changes the sector has already seen
over the last decade. We manage our
position responsibly – not only keeping
our finger on the pulse by tracking
changes, gathering information and
collating trends, but also being able to
reasonably pre-empt and pre-plan for
upcoming staffing requirements. This
influences our recruitment strategy to
ensure we are assisting efficiently and
effectively. So, what do we see as the
focus points for the next five years?
With ever-increasing demand, the
expansion of the workforce is of
paramount importance and will be the
key challenge for the NHS as a whole
over the next five to eight years. If not
managed effectively, the NHS itself is
at stake. Brexit risks a further decline in
the pool of clinicians available, so action
must be taken now. In general practice,
this means both recruiting and training
practice nurses and GPs, and further
integrating pharmacist prescribers and
nurse practitioners. Moving forward,
continued awareness of the capabilities
of these new staff and assistance for
centres in adjusting to current structures
(such as introducing streaming) so
they can reap the benefits of these
clinicians is imperative. At Chase
Medical, we will continue our work
with practice managers, GP partners
and CCGs, addressing specific shortfalls
and identifying the most suitable
clinician for each unique centre, in
terms of their existing team and their
patientdemographic.
Alternative staff are the
solution to a growing
shortage of GP appointments
in primary care
As we have
worked within
primary care
across the UK
for many
years, we are
in a unique
position
13CHASE MEDICAL |
HEALTHCARE & PHARMACEUTICAL
In order to maximise the capacity of
the NHS, we must also ensure the
retention of staff. Our ability to provide
flexible working has improved retention
of several staff groups – for example,
those clinicians reaching retirement,
who have been able to wind down
more gradually by moving to locum
work, rather than stopping completely,
which enables us to continue to
utilise this highly skilled portion of the
workforce. Additionally, return-to-work
training programmes have seen practice
nurses renew their registrations, and we
have been welcoming them back and
supporting them in their return. Our
focus here will be on continued help as
more of these schemes are rolled out
between now and 2024.
Always improving
We were pleased to hear of plans for
investment in the NHS at a primary
and community level to focus more on
prevention. Integrated care will be a
key element of this, and we are set to
assist with more extended access and
admission avoidance schemes. Bringing
forward our experience working with
large primary care service providers,
CCGs and practice groups, we will be
applying our expertise to help the new
primary care networks.
Retention is key internally, too, and with
over 30 per cent of our staff having
more than five years’ tenure with the
business, the level of knowledge is
high, and retention here remains a key
item on the agenda, year on year.
We invest heavily in our workforce
and in the business to continually
improve services to both candidates
and centres. This year, a new CRM
system has been implemented as part
of a digital innovation. This will see a
mobile shift-booking app launched in
the summer, which will enable staff
and clients to book and manage shifts
at the touch of a button.
There are many challenges ahead
in the sector, especially with Brexit
looming, but we are prepped and
ready to help tackle the growing
staffing crisis, with an enduring
commitment to finding innovative
ways to address the shortfall.
We invest
heavily in our
workforce and
in the business
to continually
improve services
to both
candidates and
centres
Planning for a way
forward

www.chase-medical.com

This article was sponsored by Chase Medical. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster