Cheadle Hulme School

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Cheadle Hulme School's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Cheadle Hulme School is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.cheadlehulmeschool.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
14 | CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL
Headteacher Neil Smith
Engaged in learning
Since its foundation as the Manchester Warehousemen and
Clerks Orphans School in the mid-19th century, Cheadle
Hulme School has delivered an education underpinned
by a set of educational and moral values. These values were
manifested in their commitment to co-education at foundation,
and a commitment to delivering an education which did not
contain differences in curriculum for boys and girls, something
which was prevalent in most other schools at that time. More
recently, they have focused on teacher training and ongoing
development. Headteacher Neil Smith explains these values and
their commitment to developing their staff.
In recent years, the school has codified its core values: integrity, endeavour,
resilience, compassion and contribution. These values apply to all members of the
school community, and as well as providing a framework for pupil activity, they also
provide a framework for our expectations of staff. Integral to these expectations is
a strong and embedded commitment to professional development, just one of the
elements that make it the school it is today.
Our model of professional development is based on several core principles:
the leadership of the school has to create a number of varied opportunities for
development; professional development has to be based on both the school’s and
the individual’s needs; collaboration with colleagues inside or beyond the institution
is essential; and the leadership of the school has to create a culture where
continuous learning is seen as integral to every teacher’s role.
REPORT CARD
CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Neil Smith
»Founded in 1855
»Based in Cheadle Hulme,
Stockport, Greater Manchester
»Type of school: Independent
co-educational day school for
students aged 3 to 18
»No. of students: 1 ,500
»No. of staff: 154
Cheadle Hulme
School
15CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL |
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Supporting new entrants to
the profession
Alongside a highly successful NQT
programme, we have pioneered an
innovative and original programme
for teachers who are employed in
independent schools but who do not
have qualified teacher status. Schools
in the independent sector have been
able to recruit teachers without QTS
for many years. This has enabled
schools such as ours to identify
teachers with great potential but who
have not pursued a traditional PGCE or
BEd route into teaching, and who may
instead be considering a career change
or wishing to move straight from
postgraduate study into the profession.
The priority when recruiting is always
to find the best possible teacher for
our pupils, and having the flexibility
to look at awide field of applicants
strengthens our ability to achieve
thisobjective.
However, we are committed to the
principle that all teachers who join us
must gain QTS and embed continued
professional learning in their approach.
As a result, we collaborated with
Manchester Metropolitan University
and another north west independent
school to write a new independent
schools teacher training programme,
which is now used by HMC schools
across the north west, and is in its
fourth year of operation. At the
heart of this programme is a focus
not only on what it means to be an
outstanding practitioner, but also
on the importance of continuous
reflection and development, which are
the hallmarks of all effective teachers.
Developing teachers for the
next stage in their career
Once a teacher has completed their
NQT year, the formal process of
teacher development stops abruptly.
Even with the government’s plans to
extend the NQT process to two years,
formal support for new entrants into
the profession will still be very much
at the discretion of the individual
school. In keeping with our belief in
continuous professional learning, we
have initiated a new recently qualified
teacher programme, developed in
collaboration with one of our partner
schools in the state sector. Our hope
is that this new programme, which
will cover RQTs in years two to four
of their teaching career, will not only
provide the necessary advice, support
and challenge for new teachers, but
will also act as a focus for early-stage
action research as well as a more
robust platform at the start of their
career than is currently the norm. It
is also an excellent example of the
type of productive partnerships that
characterise many schools in the
independent and state sectors.
While it may, at first glance, appear
counter-intuitive, a school’s leadership
team should take the opportunity to
develop and support its staff in their
ambition to move forward in their
career, even though this may result
in highly prized staff moving on to
a different school. In recent years,
we have provided extensive support
for teachers wishing to move into
middle management through the
opportunity to participate in a middle
Celebrating 150 years at
our current site this year
The priority
when
recruiting is
always to find
the best
possible
teacher for
our pupils
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
14 | CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL
Headteacher Neil Smith
Engaged in learning
Since its foundation as the Manchester Warehousemen and
Clerks Orphans School in the mid-19th century, Cheadle
Hulme School has delivered an education underpinned
by a set of educational and moral values. These values were
manifested in their commitment to co-education at foundation,
and a commitment to delivering an education which did not
contain differences in curriculum for boys and girls, something
which was prevalent in most other schools at that time. More
recently, they have focused on teacher training and ongoing
development. Headteacher Neil Smith explains these values and
their commitment to developing their staff.
In recent years, the school has codified its core values: integrity, endeavour,
resilience, compassion and contribution. These values apply to all members of the
school community, and as well as providing a framework for pupil activity, they also
provide a framework for our expectations of staff. Integral to these expectations is
a strong and embedded commitment to professional development, just one of the
elements that make it the school it is today.
Our model of professional development is based on several core principles:
the leadership of the school has to create a number of varied opportunities for
development; professional development has to be based on both the school’s and
the individual’s needs; collaboration with colleagues inside or beyond the institution
is essential; and the leadership of the school has to create a culture where
continuous learning is seen as integral to every teacher’s role.
REPORT CARD
CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Neil Smith
»Founded in 1855
»Based in Cheadle Hulme,
Stockport, Greater Manchester
»Type of school: Independent
co-educational day school for
students aged 3 to 18
»No. of students: 1 ,500
»No. of staff: 154
Cheadle Hulme
School
15CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL |
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Supporting new entrants to
the profession
Alongside a highly successful NQT
programme, we have pioneered an
innovative and original programme
for teachers who are employed in
independent schools but who do not
have qualified teacher status. Schools
in the independent sector have been
able to recruit teachers without QTS
for many years. This has enabled
schools such as ours to identify
teachers with great potential but who
have not pursued a traditional PGCE or
BEd route into teaching, and who may
instead be considering a career change
or wishing to move straight from
postgraduate study into the profession.
The priority when recruiting is always
to find the best possible teacher for
our pupils, and having the flexibility
to look at awide field of applicants
strengthens our ability to achieve
thisobjective.
However, we are committed to the
principle that all teachers who join us
must gain QTS and embed continued
professional learning in their approach.
As a result, we collaborated with
Manchester Metropolitan University
and another north west independent
school to write a new independent
schools teacher training programme,
which is now used by HMC schools
across the north west, and is in its
fourth year of operation. At the
heart of this programme is a focus
not only on what it means to be an
outstanding practitioner, but also
on the importance of continuous
reflection and development, which are
the hallmarks of all effective teachers.
Developing teachers for the
next stage in their career
Once a teacher has completed their
NQT year, the formal process of
teacher development stops abruptly.
Even with the government’s plans to
extend the NQT process to two years,
formal support for new entrants into
the profession will still be very much
at the discretion of the individual
school. In keeping with our belief in
continuous professional learning, we
have initiated a new recently qualified
teacher programme, developed in
collaboration with one of our partner
schools in the state sector. Our hope
is that this new programme, which
will cover RQTs in years two to four
of their teaching career, will not only
provide the necessary advice, support
and challenge for new teachers, but
will also act as a focus for early-stage
action research as well as a more
robust platform at the start of their
career than is currently the norm. It
is also an excellent example of the
type of productive partnerships that
characterise many schools in the
independent and state sectors.
While it may, at first glance, appear
counter-intuitive, a school’s leadership
team should take the opportunity to
develop and support its staff in their
ambition to move forward in their
career, even though this may result
in highly prized staff moving on to
a different school. In recent years,
we have provided extensive support
for teachers wishing to move into
middle management through the
opportunity to participate in a middle
Celebrating 150 years at
our current site this year
The priority
when
recruiting is
always to find
the best
possible
teacher for
our pupils
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | CHEADLE HULME SCHOOL
leaders coaching course, offered
in conjunction with Manchester
BusinessSchool.
Facilitating existing middle leaders to
gain the necessary skills and experience
to progress to senior leadership is,
equally, a responsibility of a school
committed to the professional
development of its staff. This is
especially important given the relatively
small number of affordable, high-
quality external training opportunities
available for staff wishing to make this
move. Over the course of the last two
years, we have worked with other local
HMC schools to provide “Introduction
to senior leadership” afternoons.
During these sessions, teachers
from these schools meet to share
experiences from their own specific
contexts and hear presentations from
existing senior leaders, with a particular
focus on those areas of senior
leadership which the teachers may
not have had direct access to in their
current roles, such as whole-school HR,
finance, and marketing. We are also
delighted that our current state school
partnership with a local academy trust
has resulted in a small number of our
staff joining a combined SLT training
programme, which will also see staff
from both schools experiencing life
at a senior level in different types
ofschool.
Embedding a culture of
professional learning
When a teacher joins us, they become
part of a community in which
professional learning is a central feature
of their working life. This professional
learning is supported in a variety of
ways. For staff intent on acquiring
formal accreditation of their professional
development, opportunities to pursue
masters’-level units are available through
our work with MMU. However, for
most staff, the reason behind such
development is not recognition through
accreditation, but is instead a result of
striving to be the best teacher possible.
From September 2019, alongside weekly
breakfast CPD sessions, all teachers will
join a hub of fellow colleagues who
share their professional practice focus
for the next two academic years. This
will enable them to discuss common
issues, approaches and enquiries, with
the ultimate outcome of a mini-research
project to be shared with all other staff.
We are very proud of the focus and
energy that we invest in professional
development as we believe that it
not only leads to the recruitment and
enhancement of high-quality teachers,
but that it also has a significant positive
impact on the educational experience
of every pupil in the school.
Set in 83 acres, our
beautiful site gives every
child plenty of space to
work and play
We are very
proud of the
focus and
energy that
we invest in
professional
development
17BALSHAW’S CHURCH OF ENGLAND HIGH SCHOOL |
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Headteacher Steven Haycocks
Spirituality is actually distinct
from faith and religion
Founded in 1782, Balshaw’s Church of England High School
is a voluntary controlled high school for students aged 11 to
18. Voluntary controlled schools make up only about three
per cent of all secondary schools in England, and Balshaw’s
is the only such secondary school in Lancashire. Headteacher
Steven Haycocks explains that the school has outstanding staff
and extremely supportive parents and governors, who work
together to ensure the best possible education for each student,
enabling them to grow in a Christian environment and utilise
their talents and skills.
When you are stepping into the position of being only the 14th headteacher in
the school’s 237-year history, the role can feel daunting. It also raises a question
about how longevity can be attained, given the discussion about the stresses and
pressures that educational leaders find themselves under. At Balshaw’s, mental
wellbeing follows on from spiritual health, something which underpins every
mentally healthy school.
Spiritual development
Promoting the spiritual development of children in English schools has been a
requirement since the 1988 Education Act, but the idea of spirituality can feel
rather nebulous. What is spirituality? Can it be taught? What does it look like in
an educational context of high-stakes accountability that places emphasis on the
number of students who take the range of subjects that make up the EBacc –
where religious education is not classed as a humanity?
REPORT CARD
BALSHAW’S CHURCH OF
ENGLAND HIGH SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Steven Haycocks
»Founded in 1782
»Based in Leyland, Lancashire
»Type of school: Church of
England high school
»No. of students: 917
»No. of staff: 90
»www.balshaws.org.uk
Balshaw’s Church of
England High School

www.cheadlehulmeschool.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Cheadle Hulme School. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development