Chrysalis Day Support

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Chrysalis Day Support's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Chrysalis Day Support is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.chrysalisdaysupport.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
54 | CHRYSALIS DAY SUPPORT
Fortune teller at the Chrysalis
summer fête
Directors Paula Thomas
and Lynn Hulme
Chrysalis Day Support provides day support and person-
centred care to people in and around the rural village of
Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire. Director Lynn Hulme tells
The Parliamentary Review
that the centre provides a fulfilling
and stimulating experience for all guests, many of whom have
Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s and have previously suffered from a
stroke. Lynn explains how the centre continues to support the
local community and discusses how she plans to expand her
team’s reach.
Based in the rural village of Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire, we are a day care centre
for adults, specialising in person-centred care and providing a fulfilling and stimulating
day for all our guests. Originally, we tailored our service for people with Alzheimer’s or
dementia-related illnesses but over time, we have progressed to provide support for
people with a range of other conditions, including Parkinson’s and Down’s syndrome,
and we also offer support to people who have become socially isolated.
Paula and I have more than 50 years of combined service and experience in the
care sector, and previously we were registered senior managers working for
Staffordshire County Council and providing domiciliary care in the community. Our
role included oversight and management of care workers and supporting service
delivery across the county of Staffordshire. Paula and I also lead staff training
and development in a host of subjects including mental capacity, medication
and dignity in care and have promoted, coached and mentored care workers
undertaking their NVQ qualifications.
FACTS ABOUT
CHRYSALIS DAY SUPPORT
»Directors: Paula Thomas and
Lynn Hulme
»Established in 2011
»Based in Abbots Bromley,
Staffordshire
»Services: Day support for
adults
»No. of employees: 7
Chrysalis Day Support
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
54 | CHRYSALIS DAY SUPPORT
Fortune teller at the Chrysalis
summer fête
Directors Paula Thomas
and Lynn Hulme
Chrysalis Day Support provides day support and person-
centred care to people in and around the rural village of
Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire. Director Lynn Hulme tells
The Parliamentary Review
that the centre provides a fulfilling
and stimulating experience for all guests, many of whom have
Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s and have previously suffered from a
stroke. Lynn explains how the centre continues to support the
local community and discusses how she plans to expand her
team’s reach.
Based in the rural village of Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire, we are a day care centre
for adults, specialising in person-centred care and providing a fulfilling and stimulating
day for all our guests. Originally, we tailored our service for people with Alzheimer’s or
dementia-related illnesses but over time, we have progressed to provide support for
people with a range of other conditions, including Parkinson’s and Down’s syndrome,
and we also offer support to people who have become socially isolated.
Paula and I have more than 50 years of combined service and experience in the
care sector, and previously we were registered senior managers working for
Staffordshire County Council and providing domiciliary care in the community. Our
role included oversight and management of care workers and supporting service
delivery across the county of Staffordshire. Paula and I also lead staff training
and development in a host of subjects including mental capacity, medication
and dignity in care and have promoted, coached and mentored care workers
undertaking their NVQ qualifications.
FACTS ABOUT
CHRYSALIS DAY SUPPORT
»Directors: Paula Thomas and
Lynn Hulme
»Established in 2011
»Based in Abbots Bromley,
Staffordshire
»Services: Day support for
adults
»No. of employees: 7
Chrysalis Day Support
55CHRYSALIS DAY SUPPORT |
CARE
Supporting the wellbeing of
the community
After taking voluntary redundancy,
we decided to start Chrysalis because
we felt day support was integral to
the wellbeing of the older community.
Beyond this, we also wanted to work
to prevent social isolation and to
support carers with valuable respite.
We also believe prevention is better
than cure and this is the philosophy
that has been ingrained within us
from the start of our career paths in
care. We understand how this adage
enables people receiving a little help
from our service to stay as independent
as possible and to continue to be a
part of their local community.
At our centre, we have adopted a
butterfly-style approach. This entails
a wide range of activities alongside
lots of everyday items to rummage
through. It is proven to be beneficial
to both guests and staff, providing
stimulation, conversation and fun
forall.
To support our provision, we also
have Charlie, a Parson Jack Russell,
who is our therapy dog and has been
a member of staff since he was 12
weeks old. Charlie is loved by all,
especially when he greets guests with
one of his toys as they arrive.
Adapting to specific needs
Some of our guests have lost their ability
to comprehend when they are hungry
or thirsty, and their carers at home often
struggle to encourage them to eat or
drink adequate amounts. At Chrysalis,
ensuring guests have a nutritious
meal, supplemented with snacks, is an
important part of our culture. Lunch is
a vibrant social occasion when guests
and staff sit down together and enjoy
a two-course, traditional, home-
cooked meal. Guests help to lay the
tables with tablecloths, cutlery, glasses
and bud vases with flowers. This
encourages ownership and inclusion,
and a social dining setting also plays a
vital role in encouraging guests who
are reluctant to eat to do so. Chrysalis arts and crafts
area and Charlie, our
resident therapy dog
We work to
prevent social
isolation and
to support
carers with
valuable
respite
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
56 | CHRYSALIS DAY SUPPORT
We are fortunate to be in a secure but
lovely rural setting and benefit from
having a large patio and garden area.
During the good weather, guests can
spend time in the fresh air, enjoying
a range of outdoor activities such as
assisting in the garden, playing bowls
or enjoying the idyllic views of the
surrounding Staffordshire countryside.
Guests also take a great interest
in setting the vegetable seeds and
watching these grow and progress
and are delighted when the produce is
served on their lunch plate.
We also enjoy the opportunity to
celebrate with our guests throughout
the year, hosting an annual summer
fête, VE day celebration and
Christmaspantomime.
All of our staff have training to a
minimum NVQ level 2 to meet the
requirements of CQC but beyond
this, some of their most important
qualities are empathy, patience and a
sense of fun. We strive to never give
up on anyone – miracles happen every
day. We value each guest and believe
they can, and do, contribute to and
enrichsociety.
Expanding our reach
One of the main challenges we
face is reaching the people who
will benefit from our service. The
continuing challenge in social care
funding, an ever-growing ageing
population, has a knock-on effect for
us, as the funding for day services
remains limited. Every day, we
witness the power of day support in
helping people maintain, and in some
cases regain, skills that they thought
were lost.
In order to tackle these challenges,
we connect with our community by
liaising with local doctors’ surgeries
and chemists and strive to maintain
links with memory clinics and hospital
social workers. We also attend MASE
monthly, Monthly Alzheimer’s Social
Evenings, a volunteer organisation
run by Daphne Sharpe, who is a
great supporter of ours and will
signpost people to us whom she
feels will benefit from attending the
centre.
We are also proud to support and
work with local colleges – providing
student placements to those who are
studying for a career in health and
social care. This not only gives them
a valuable insight into the complex
nature of dementia care but also
teaches them how to successfully
interact with the guests and helps
equip them to progress in their
futurecareers.
As we look ahead, we are hoping to
expand our reach further and after
completing some intensive research,
we discovered there were significant
coverage gaps in Shropshire.
Because of this, we have recently
opened another day centre, Willow
Lodge in Shrewsbury, and we look
forward to sharing the benefit we
can provide with as many people
aspossible.
We strive to
never give up
on anyone
– miracles
happen every
A guest enjoying our
hairdressing facilities at
Chrysalis

www.chrysalisdaysupport.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Chrysalis Day Support. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development