City College Peterborough

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by City College Peterborough's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from City College Peterborough is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

citycollegepeterborough.ac.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
48 | CITY COLLEGE PETERBOROUGH
Executive Principal
PatCarrington MBE
City College Peterborough,
Brook Street campus
For the past 75 years, City College Peterborough has
provided access to education to more than 3,000 local
people a year. In spite of funding cuts, the college
continues to deliver on its promise of “providing a welcoming
environment that inspires people to develop and achieve
personal, social, academic and economic skills” to this day. Pat
Carrington MBE, the college’s Executive Principal, discusses the
importance of a balanced provision, learning and skills and the
celebration of learning.
In contrast to most education establishments, success at City College Peterborough
is seen not only in terms of academic achievement and exam results but through
delivering and accessing wider learning to develop the whole person.
Embedded in the organisation’s values is providing a welcoming environment that
inspires people to develop and achieve personal, social, academic and economic
skills. City College Peterborough, part of Peterborough City Council, has, for the
past 75 years, worked across the city supporting local residents to develop their
skills, build aspirations and improve their work and life chances.
Despite the funding cuts to adult education of 40 per cent over the past 10 years,
we have actively sought to increase our income, virtually doubling it. Consequently,
we have been able to expand the education and skills we offer to local people and
widen our remit while providing exceptional outcomes, with most areas performing
significantly above nationalbenchmarking.
FACTS ABOUT
CITY COLLEGE PETERBOROUGH
»Executive Principal:
PatCarrington MBE
»Founded in 1945
»Located in Peterborough
»Services: Post-16 and adult
education
»No. of employees: 240
City College
Peterborough
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
48 | CITY COLLEGE PETERBOROUGH
Executive Principal
PatCarrington MBE
City College Peterborough,
Brook Street campus
For the past 75 years, City College Peterborough has
provided access to education to more than 3,000 local
people a year. In spite of funding cuts, the college
continues to deliver on its promise of “providing a welcoming
environment that inspires people to develop and achieve
personal, social, academic and economic skills” to this day. Pat
Carrington MBE, the college’s Executive Principal, discusses the
importance of a balanced provision, learning and skills and the
celebration of learning.
In contrast to most education establishments, success at City College Peterborough
is seen not only in terms of academic achievement and exam results but through
delivering and accessing wider learning to develop the whole person.
Embedded in the organisation’s values is providing a welcoming environment that
inspires people to develop and achieve personal, social, academic and economic
skills. City College Peterborough, part of Peterborough City Council, has, for the
past 75 years, worked across the city supporting local residents to develop their
skills, build aspirations and improve their work and life chances.
Despite the funding cuts to adult education of 40 per cent over the past 10 years,
we have actively sought to increase our income, virtually doubling it. Consequently,
we have been able to expand the education and skills we offer to local people and
widen our remit while providing exceptional outcomes, with most areas performing
significantly above nationalbenchmarking.
FACTS ABOUT
CITY COLLEGE PETERBOROUGH
»Executive Principal:
PatCarrington MBE
»Founded in 1945
»Located in Peterborough
»Services: Post-16 and adult
education
»No. of employees: 240
City College
Peterborough
49CITY COLLEGE PETERBOROUGH |
EDUCATION SERVICES
Key to our success
The key to our success has been
creating an environment and culture
that encourages all staff, especially
tutors and support staff, to have
ambitious and bold plans for each
student and the people we support.
This person-centred approach,
alongside knowing the strengths of our
highly skilled and committed workforce,
has allowed us to diversify our income
stream, maximising the public purse
and increasing the quality of our
provision while ensuring we remain
financially viable and sustainable. To
achieve this, we recruit educationalists
who possess the commercial
awareness and strong management
and business skillsrequired.
Part of this educational and business
acumen lies in understanding that
what we do needs to be fully aligned
to the local need. To achieve this, we
work not just with some of our most
vulnerable residents – often the area
for which adult education is known –
but also with businesses to upskill their
workforces, support work and pay
progression, and deliver professional
skills and qualifications on demand.
Our college, therefore, offers a broad
mix and balance of provision designed
to help mitigate the challenges we face
in the sector.
Adult education
Alongside the standard adult education
courses delivering maths, English,
employability and vocational skills, we
operate a project-themed approach
to learning. Based in a city that has
experienced significant inward migration,
the necessity for programmes that meet
the needs of our diverse population has
been central to ourplanning.
One such initiative, aimed at reducing
the impact of migration on settled
communities and public services,
was partnered with Health, Housing,
Education and Employment to design
a project delivering English language
training, contextualised with distributing
information about these public services.
Course content was developed along
with tutor guides on delivering the
course to address the lack of trained
tutors and to reduce delivery costs. Forty
volunteers from established communities
were trained and delivered the material
to over 600 learners over two years
across accessible community venues.
Apprenticeships and business
skills
With a significant drop in apprenticeship
numbers as a result of the introduction
of the levy, we knew we had to change
the way in which we had traditionally
offered our apprenticeships. Innovation
was key, and one of the unique
approaches we adopted was to place
a high-quality, experienced assessor in
one of the city’s largest employer’s HR
department to manage and support its
recruitment of apprentices. This resulted
in an 80 per cent increase in the take-up
of apprenticeships following the levy
crash of April 2017.
Delivering business skills is not just
about apprenticeships, and with the
backing and funding of our combined
authority, we are taking a sector-based
approach to help address some of the
shortages of skilled staff in the health
Supported enterprise at
the Industrial Hub
English
outcomes were
89 per cent
and maths 91
per cent. Such
impressive
educational
outcomes were
due to
wraparound
support for
learners
enabling them
to achieve
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
50 | CITY COLLEGE PETERBOROUGH
and care sector by using a Sector Work
Academy co-designed with employers,
which has, in its first 18 months, seen
over 500 students access theacademy.
Specialist provision for young
people
A collaborative approach from all staffis
central to the programmes, delivering
learning to some of our vulnerable and
low-skilled young people, often with
multiple barriers to accessing education.
This is where developing the whole
person is critical to educational success.
Our wellbeing team supports over 200
young people a year with social and
emotional barriers to learning, including
learners with disabilities, autism, and
profound and multiple disabilities.
The past year saw us retain 97 per
cent of our learners on their learning
programmes and 100 per cent achieve
their vocational learning aims. English
outcomes were 89 per cent and
maths 91 per cent. Such impressive
educational outcomes were due to
wraparound support for learners
enabling them to achieve.
Hubs
At an annual cost of £1.6 million, the
Day Opportunities programme, as
highlighted in a recent independent
report, delivers cost avoidance of at
least £3 million a year to Peterborough
City Council and health services, and
as much as £16 million in welfare
benefits. City College offers Day
Opportunities Hubs on behalf of Adult
Social Care, giving adults with learning
difficulties and disabilities access to job
coaches, the opportunity to develop
skills that enhance their work and life
prospects, or the chance to work in
one of our supported enterprises, such
as the successful catering business of
Royce Rolls.
Celebration of Learning
The highlight of our year is our
“Celebration of Learning” event held
annually at Peterborough Cathedral.
This year, we were fortunate to
have Warwick Davis give up his time
to present over 300 certificates to
our students and the people we
support, each certificate testament
to their individual achievement and
uniquelyprecious.
In future, we hope to continue
to reflect the needs of our local
community and to maintain sufficient
agility to allow us to do so. Despite
the changes ahead, both locally and
nationally, we are confident in our
ability to perform.
The key to our
success has
been creating
an environment
and culture
that
encourages all
staff, especially
tutors and
support staff,
to have
ambitious and
bold plans for
each student
and the people
we support
Students celebrating
their achievements

citycollegepeterborough.ac.uk

This article was sponsored by City College Peterborough. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development