Cochrane Dental Care

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Cochrane Dental Care's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Cochrane Dental Care is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.cochranedental.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
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32 | COCHRANE DENTAL CARE
Practice Manager Claire
Cochrane and Practice Principal
Paul Cochrane
Practice Principal
PaulCochrane
Cochrane Dental Care offers general dentistry services,
enhanced by postgraduate interests in endodontics and
periodontology. Established in 2016, the practice places
patient care at the centre of all their activities. This commitment
to care is characterised by three key values: integrity, altruism
and excellence. Practice Principal Paul Cochrane discusses
the surgery’s commitment to ethical dental care and how
undergraduate dental education should adopt a stronger focus
on reflection and understanding.
I founded the company in 2016, taking over a practice in Coleraine, on the north
coast of Northern Ireland. We provide comprehensive dental services supported by
tailored dental plans, and we also maintain an NHS provision for children. In terms
of our patients, we are rapidly developing from a traditional NHS base to having an
expanded private focus, which is helping patients to experience modern dental care
that is evidence-based, and which seeks to meet our patients’ expectations. Our
team is made up of seven employees and covers a wide range of clinical interests
and skillsets. The central tenet of our services is a complete focus on the individual
needs of our patients, and reflected in this process are our values of integrity,
altruism and excellence.
Our general dentistry is supported and supplemented by my clinical interest in
endodontics and Marie’s postgraduate studies in periodontology. We seek to use
our practical qualifications and clinical studies to enhance the care we provide while
simultaneously taking the patient on a healthcare journey where their quality outcomes
will always be the priority. While studying, I learnt a great deal about the specifics of
FACTS ABOUT
COCHRANE DENTAL CARE
»Practice Principal: Paul Cochrane
»Established in 2016
»Based in Coleraine, Northern
Ireland
»No. of employees: 7
»Services: General dentistry
with a developing special
interest in endodontics and
periodontics
Cochrane Dental Care
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | COCHRANE DENTAL CARE
Practice Manager Claire
Cochrane and Practice Principal
Paul Cochrane
Practice Principal
PaulCochrane
Cochrane Dental Care offers general dentistry services,
enhanced by postgraduate interests in endodontics and
periodontology. Established in 2016, the practice places
patient care at the centre of all their activities. This commitment
to care is characterised by three key values: integrity, altruism
and excellence. Practice Principal Paul Cochrane discusses
the surgery’s commitment to ethical dental care and how
undergraduate dental education should adopt a stronger focus
on reflection and understanding.
I founded the company in 2016, taking over a practice in Coleraine, on the north
coast of Northern Ireland. We provide comprehensive dental services supported by
tailored dental plans, and we also maintain an NHS provision for children. In terms
of our patients, we are rapidly developing from a traditional NHS base to having an
expanded private focus, which is helping patients to experience modern dental care
that is evidence-based, and which seeks to meet our patients’ expectations. Our
team is made up of seven employees and covers a wide range of clinical interests
and skillsets. The central tenet of our services is a complete focus on the individual
needs of our patients, and reflected in this process are our values of integrity,
altruism and excellence.
Our general dentistry is supported and supplemented by my clinical interest in
endodontics and Marie’s postgraduate studies in periodontology. We seek to use
our practical qualifications and clinical studies to enhance the care we provide while
simultaneously taking the patient on a healthcare journey where their quality outcomes
will always be the priority. While studying, I learnt a great deal about the specifics of
FACTS ABOUT
COCHRANE DENTAL CARE
»Practice Principal: Paul Cochrane
»Established in 2016
»Based in Coleraine, Northern
Ireland
»No. of employees: 7
»Services: General dentistry
with a developing special
interest in endodontics and
periodontics
Cochrane Dental Care
33COCHRANE DENTAL CARE |
DENTISTRY
dentistry, yet I often sensed that the
holistic nature of caring for our patients
was perhaps subservient. Dentists
must of course be clinically competent;
however, in addition to this, it is our
focus on the patient as an individual
that complements the care they
receive. Therefore, being a successful
business is important, but even more
crucial is performing our caring role as
members of the healthcare team.
Dentistry is an ethical exercise
Patients always come first and, in my
career thus far, I have witnessed some
practices who simply try to adhere to
standards and neglect the importance
of complete dental care for the patient.
First and foremost, dentistry is an ethical
exercise: as we are trusted by our
patients, it has to be. While preventing
and curing disease is the main focus of
our clinical activities, to be a successful
practitioner in terms of effective and
patient-centred care, we must also
demonstrate ethical competency.
Our ethical obligations are as serious
as the physical act of dentistry. We
take ownership of what we do
and are honest, delivering a total
commitment to our patients to build
these relationships. I always advocate
personal authenticity from the clinician
alongside a strong commitment to
professional responsibility.
Developing genuine
connections
For us, dentistry is not just a job and
commercial self-interest does not
dominate our actions. We always aim
to give more than we receive, and
we have promoted an environment
in which there is a revulsion at self-
interestedness and commercialism. Our
commitment to this supererogation
means that our patients never feel
belittled or sidelined and know they
have our full attention. Ourprofessional
responsibility is manifested in our
attitude towards sector regulation. It
is easy to complain, but there are a
number of reasons why we have the
governance we do, and we embrace
clinical governance and respect the
expectations it places on us as a
carefacility.
We are always fully present for the
patient without distraction. This type of
commitment is a genuine connection of
not merely the continuity of the patient
receiving the same care or seeing the
same dentist, but it is also the patient
receiving support from a professional
that is dedicated to them as individuals.
This brand of engagement aims to be
wholly centred on the patients and
respecting their informed choices.
Developing professionalism
among younger generations
A key interest of ours is grassroots
dentistry. The young graduates of today
have an excellent education in the
theory of dentistry and good supervision
in the practice, but I wonder if they
have had the complete education in
the ethics and professionalism that
connect todentistry.
The profession’s newest colleagues
need to develop and broaden a deep,
ethical reflection and understanding
to support their decision-making.
Collaborative clinicians
focused on patients’ needs
Dentistry is an
ethical
exercise; as
we are trusted
by our
patients, it has
to be
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
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34 | COCHRANE DENTAL CARE
Society expects high standards of
ethical professionalism from graduates
to professors, and while experience
does provide a measure of this, the
newly qualified dentist is not afforded
the opportunity to learn ethics from
mistakes. The risks of failure are too
high to be able to do this, and so I
believe educators and dental schools
need to realise that a complete and
overarching ethical curriculum should
be meaningfully inculcated into the
dental undergraduate experience.
For postgraduates, we need to develop
a strong sense of accountability. We
need to be brave in adopting an
inspiring message that will challenge
people to look at how we can change
the fact that poor dental work can
often go unchallenged and we have
a system of dental care that is at best
outdated and at worst failing the
population. The standard of political
support for dental healthcare reform
in Northern Ireland is at a low, and
without a sitting government, we
cannot achieve meaningful progress.
With this backdrop, I am moving
further away from the NHS as a
practice; however, I know I am able
to provide better care for my patients,
and until there is a government that
puts people’s dental care as a priority,
I will hold to this trajectory. We need
good leaders, and at the moment, they
are simply not there.
I am sure the majority of dentists go
to their places of work to care for
patients; however, I would make
a plea to the future governance of
dentistry that they find a better way
to regulate the dentists who can
perform poorly and then simply walk
away from the profession and into
retirement without recrimination. We
need to find a way to change this in
Northern Ireland, where currently, a
dentist can retire themselves away
from fair accountability, and a patient’s
only recourse is to litigate against
them. This is a deeply unsatisfactory
position to find ourselves in. It sends a
wholly demoralising message to active
dentists engaged in the challenges
of everyday dentistry and promotes a
survival mentality in some colleagues
where retirement is imminent. There is
no substitute for great levels of care,
competence and communication.
The demands of dentistry are real,
as are the responsibilities, and the
way to thrive as a professional is to
embracethem.
There is no
substitute for
great levels
ofcare,
competence and
communication
The great team behind
our patients’ care

www.cochranedental.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Cochrane Dental Care. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development