Connected Places Catapult

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Connected Places Catapult's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Connected Places Catapult is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

cp.catapult.org.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
28 | ELEMENTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Historical challenges
The historical challenge we were
faced with as an industry was growing
the reputation of our business as a
legitimate one within the marketplace.
The traditional way in which people
dealt scrap metal was cash in hand,
which prevented more reputable
businesspeople from becoming
involved in the industry.
We feel that legislative changes have
been to the benefit of the industry,
in spite of initial opposition. The
historic motivation for working within
this industry was one of family ties
and, as such, change was not always
welcomed. It is important that any
legislation introduced to this specific
industry is implemented with precision
and due consideration.
We continue to look to those who
are performing outside of our own
industry. In order to best survive,
we understand we must maintain
our success in the long term, either
through innovating within the industry
or looking outside of it.
Building our reputation
In the coming years we hope to
continue to provide the services we
do at present. Through continuing to
innovate and growing much as we
have done from the start, we believe
we will be able to continue to develop
our industry and our role within it.
We aim to build our reputation and
to continue the success we have at
present. We do not just perform our
services within the UK and see no
reason why this cannot be rolled out
across the world.
Ultimately, we hope to reach a point
where our name is synonymous with
the recovery of precious metals and
secondary markets.
We feel that
legislative
changes have
been to the
benefit of the
industry, in
spite of initial
opposition
29CONNECTED PLACES CATAPULT |
INFRASTRUCTURE & DEVELOPMENT
CEO Nicola Yates OBE
With the world rapidly urbanising, there is a $3.7 trillion
global market for firms who can deliver innovation solutions in
affordable housing, clean growth, and decarbonised mobility
The link between productivity and place is an increasingly
popular discussion topic in government and business.
According to Nicola Yates OBE, CEO of the Connected
Places Catapult, the answer lies in using innovative technologies
to unlock the potential of UK towns and cities. Working with the
public and private sectors as well as researchers and regulators,
Nicola explains that the Connected Places Catapult drives the
commercialisation of research and stimulates demand for
innovation. She tells
The Parliamentary Review
about their push to
help place leaders embrace emerging technologies and dismantle
barriers holding back innovative businesses.
Despite once leading Europe on productivity, data from the Office for National
Statistics reveals that the average British worker produced 16 per cent less on
average than counterparts in other members of the G7 in 2016.
This problem is also unevenly distributed. Workers in Aberdeen, Edinburgh,
Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and the West of England perform above
the UK average, while those in Cornwall and the Sheffield City Region have the
lowest relative productivity. Meanwhile, London has roughly equivalent productivity to
Germany, with rates 50 per cent above the UK nationalaverage.
Infrastructure and technology define productivity
Research undertaken for the West Midlands Combined Authority in 2018
demonstrates that high-calibre connectivity and infrastructure are essential to
FACTS ABOUT
CONNECTED PLACES
CATAPULT
»CEO: Nicola Yates OBE
»Established in 2019 following
the merger of the Future
Cities and Transport Systems
Catapults – both founded in
2012
»Based in London, Milton
Keynes, Glasgow and Leeds
»Services: Innovation support
and technology demonstration
»No. of employees: 225
»Businesses supported by the
Catapult saw turnover grow
34 per cent more quickly than
a matched control group
Connected Places
Catapult
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | CONNECTED PLACES CATAPULT
productivity and regional growth. Poor
connectivity, planning and infrastructure
are holding towns and cities back from
realising their full potential.
Analysis by ODI Leeds, for example,
illustrated that Birmingham’s productivity
is 33 per cent lower than a city of its size
should be, largely because of its poor
cross-city transport. Likewise, Leeds is
the biggest city in Europe without a
mass transit system, and the two most
congested commuter lines in the country
are the train lines going into Manchester.
From innovative feats of engineering
such as bridges and skyscrapers to
pioneering service models like public
transport networks or digital solutions
like contactless payments, there is a
strong track record of places harnessing
innovative technologies to amplify
different forms of connectivity and
unlock greater productivity benefits.
Today’s new and emerging
technologies offer similar step changes
in local productivity, including:
»More agile planning services that
harness data and digital tools to
identify and unlock land for faster,
cheaper development
»Advanced data models and
sensors which unlock new capacity
from existing infrastructure
and assets, and enable more
responsivemanagement
»Innovative mobility solutions
that take traffic off the roads,
reducingcongestion
»Neuroscience-inspired design concepts
that improve productivity in our
workspaces and inclusion in our
public spaces
»Digital connectivity that enables new
forms of collaboration, creativity and
user experiences alongside more
efficient, intelligent asset management
Despite the potential of such innovations
to deliver step changes in service delivery
and user experience, public authorities
are often slow to adopt new technologies
due to strict regulatory environments,
overlapping systems of responsibility and
ownership, conservative commissioning
cultures and constrained publicbudgets.
At the Connected Places Catapult
we work to dismantle these market
failures and accelerate the commercial
application of innovative research and
emerging technologies. We partner
with industry, research institutions and
placeleaders to foster new services
and solutions for places, generating
commercial opportunities for British
firms and delivering the connectivity
upgrades that the UK’s towns and
cities need to realise their potential.
Stimulating investment
We pulled together the consortium
that delivered the world’s first
demonstration of an autonomous
vehicle on public land, the Low-Carbon
Urban Transport Zone Pathfinder
Project, with Oxford University, RDM
and Milton Keynes Council. This
project stimulated an additional £435
million investment in UK connected
and autonomous vehicles research.
Furthermore, it laid the foundation for
further public and private investment
in CAV. By 2017, the UK had attracted
£500 million of inward investment
related to driverless cars, with Nissan
and Hitachi consolidating their CAV
capabilities here as a result of the
Catapult’s pioneering activities.
More recently we have been catalysing
a digital upgrade in the UK’s land use
Connected Places
Catapult partnered
with 290 organisations
during 2019/20 through
its programme of
collaborative projects and
market convening events
High-calibre
connectivity
and
infrastructure
are essential
to productivity
and regional
growth
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | CONNECTED PLACES CATAPULT
productivity and regional growth. Poor
connectivity, planning and infrastructure
are holding towns and cities back from
realising their full potential.
Analysis by ODI Leeds, for example,
illustrated that Birmingham’s productivity
is 33 per cent lower than a city of its size
should be, largely because of its poor
cross-city transport. Likewise, Leeds is
the biggest city in Europe without a
mass transit system, and the two most
congested commuter lines in the country
are the train lines going into Manchester.
From innovative feats of engineering
such as bridges and skyscrapers to
pioneering service models like public
transport networks or digital solutions
like contactless payments, there is a
strong track record of places harnessing
innovative technologies to amplify
different forms of connectivity and
unlock greater productivity benefits.
Today’s new and emerging
technologies offer similar step changes
in local productivity, including:
»More agile planning services that
harness data and digital tools to
identify and unlock land for faster,
cheaper development
»Advanced data models and
sensors which unlock new capacity
from existing infrastructure
and assets, and enable more
responsivemanagement
»Innovative mobility solutions
that take traffic off the roads,
reducingcongestion
»Neuroscience-inspired design concepts
that improve productivity in our
workspaces and inclusion in our
public spaces
»Digital connectivity that enables new
forms of collaboration, creativity and
user experiences alongside more
efficient, intelligent asset management
Despite the potential of such innovations
to deliver step changes in service delivery
and user experience, public authorities
are often slow to adopt new technologies
due to strict regulatory environments,
overlapping systems of responsibility and
ownership, conservative commissioning
cultures and constrained publicbudgets.
At the Connected Places Catapult
we work to dismantle these market
failures and accelerate the commercial
application of innovative research and
emerging technologies. We partner
with industry, research institutions and
placeleaders to foster new services
and solutions for places, generating
commercial opportunities for British
firms and delivering the connectivity
upgrades that the UK’s towns and
cities need to realise their potential.
Stimulating investment
We pulled together the consortium
that delivered the world’s first
demonstration of an autonomous
vehicle on public land, the Low-Carbon
Urban Transport Zone Pathfinder
Project, with Oxford University, RDM
and Milton Keynes Council. This
project stimulated an additional £435
million investment in UK connected
and autonomous vehicles research.
Furthermore, it laid the foundation for
further public and private investment
in CAV. By 2017, the UK had attracted
£500 million of inward investment
related to driverless cars, with Nissan
and Hitachi consolidating their CAV
capabilities here as a result of the
Catapult’s pioneering activities.
More recently we have been catalysing
a digital upgrade in the UK’s land use
Connected Places
Catapult partnered
with 290 organisations
during 2019/20 through
its programme of
collaborative projects and
market convening events
High-calibre
connectivity
and
infrastructure
are essential
to productivity
and regional
growth
31CONNECTED PLACES CATAPULT |
INFRASTRUCTURE & DEVELOPMENT
planning system, creating a space
for PlanTech innovators to develop
and demonstrate challenger solutions
offering new levels of efficiency,
transparency and effectiveness in the
development and management ofland.
Currently, we are looking at how those
new services can be integrated with
others to see whole infrastructure
systems and the places they support
reproduced in the form of digital
twins, sophisticated virtual models
used to test proposed changes before
making costly interventions in the real
world. Combining dynamic data about
fixed assets like buildings, transport
infrastructure and utilities networks
with real time and modelled data
about the movement of people and
goods through the space, these digital
twins will be an essential tool for city
managers of the future.
Prioritising solutions towards
clean growth
Efforts to foster local growth must
be couched in the context of climate
change and the push for net zero.
As such, we are prioritising solutions
that accelerate decarbonisation and
environmental sustainability to achieve
clean local growth. For that reason,
we are working
with other parts of the
Catapult Network to hasten the roll-out
of infrastructure for electric vehicles,
encourage local area energy planning
and look at what infrastructure will be
needed to decarbonise larger vehicles
for which electric batteries may not
besuitable.
We are also looking at tackling the
market failures keeping us from
reducing emissions related to heating
and powering our homes.
Recognising that the market failure is as
much one of demand as it is supply, we
are investing in tackling the underlying
barriers to the demonstration and
implementation of solutions promising
to transform the destiny of local
economies. We therefore work with key
sector organisations to raise awareness
among time-poor place leaders about
what is possible, and challenge popular
myths about public procurement.
Setting up the 5G Action Learning
Network has been a way for council
officers across the UK to pool resources
in seeking to answer practical questions
related to the roll-out of the next-
generation digital infrastructure upon
which many future services willrely.
Similarly, we champion the development
and use of standards enabling solutions
to be implemented with ease from one
place to the next. Places are unique, but
the problems they face are not.
Too often we hear of councils or
other public authorities seeking highly
adapted solutions from the market
rather than building on common
interoperable standards. This is bad
for firms who can’t easily scale their
products and grow their business, and
for places who have to wait longer and
spend more than is necessary to realise
the benefits of innovation.
Places thrive on their ability to connect
people to resources, opportunities,
ideas and each other. New and
emerging technologies have the
potential to deliver better planned,
better functioning places. By harnessing
innovation, place leaders can create
the conditions for success and ensure
that more UK towns and cities realise
greater productivity and prosperity.
Digital Twins
will be an
essential tool
for city
managers of
the future
From driverless cars to
drones and advanced
data models, Connected
Places Catapult helps
place leaders understand
the art of the possible
and engage the
innovation market with
confidence

cp.catapult.org.uk

This article was sponsored by Connected Places Catapult. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development