Cornwall Care

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Cornwall Care's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Cornwall Care is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.cornwallcare.com

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
15CORNWALL CARE |
CARE
Chief Executive Officer
AnneThomas
Reddanick residents’ trip to
the Cornish Goldsmiths
Cornwall Care operates across the whole of Cornwall,
providing homecare and residential care predominantly
to older people. A registered charity with 16 separate
care homes, it caters for around 650 people in its homes and
supports another 500 within the community. CEO Anne Thomas
tells
The Parliamentary Review
that its team of 1,350 staff
makes it the biggest independent provider in Cornwall.
Since our establishment, the number of our homes has remained the same but we
have diversified our offering, moving into homecare support and supportive lifestyle
provision. Over this time, the complexity and the dependency of our residents’
needs has increased, largely driven by a rise in complex needs associated with
dementia, frailty and the overall growth of the elderly demographic.
Remembering the fundamental importance of nutrition and
hydration
Our absolute focus is on the fundamentals: what care we need to deliver to
keep the people we provide care to healthy. Using the Reliance on Carer tool,
we are able to assess how much time and support our residents require for the
fundamentals in life, such as drinking, eating and physical movement, for both care
and social needs.
We use this information to review how we staff each home and the specific skills
and training our staff need to enable them to provide excellent care. This principle
also applies to the people we support in their own homes. There is not enough
recognition paid to the support and intervention needed to assist vulnerable people
FACTS ABOUT
CORNWALL CARE
»Chief Executive Officer:
AnneThomas
»Established in 1996
»Based in Truro
»Services: Residential, nursing,
supportive lifestyles and
homecare services
»No. of employees: 1,350
Cornwall Care
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | CORNWALL CARE
to eat and drink. The accepted medical
model that drives the assessment and
development of national care pathways
overlooks this basic, but absolutely
fundamental, aspect of good care. If
people do not have enough to eat and
drink, it has a severe impact on their
health and wellbeing, compromises
skin integrity and causes pressure
ulcers, falls, broken bones, depression,
weakness and dependency.
This often overlooked aspect of care
is literally lifesaving and is under-
recognised in national strategy and
dependency assessments. We ensure
that the people we provide care to are
our single common focus.
The dependency on others to drink
and eat is the single common theme
that connects every individual to whom
we provide care and support. It is
fundamental to physical, social and
mental health.
Loss of appetite or deviation from
normal drinking is an early indicator of
deterioration in the person’s condition.
This attention to detail for each and
every person we provide care to ensures
that we know them all asindividuals.
We are using electronic care
management systems to more
accurately record the care that we
provide. These systems reduce the
amount of time that staff spend
completing paperwork and provide us
with a strategic and auditable picture
of the level of dependency across all
of our services, as well as evidence
of how effective we are in meeting
their needs. These new systems can
be programmed to provide alerts if
someone’s needs or behaviourschange.
This gives us an early warning that
someone might be deteriorating
and requires further assessment and
intervention. The information also
provides a benchmark for their current
level of dependency and enables us to
track and predict changes, thus helping
us to design and deliver services fit for
the future.
The importance of social care
Like many other providers in Cornwall,
including the NHS, recruitment and
staffing is an issue.
Workforce issues are more pronounced
in social care, however, especially as
The Green residents’
magic table fun
The
dependency
on others to
eat and drink
is the single
common
theme that
connects every
individual to
whom we
provide care
and support
17CORNWALL CARE |
CARE
those people who work in our sector
do not receive the same recognition
and praise as their NHS counterparts.
Providers like Cornwall Care provide an
essential part of the national social care
provision and are integral to the success
of health and social care services in the
UK. This was proven recently when
the NHS in Cornwall declared a “major
incident”. A lack of care and support
for the older and more vulnerable
causes pressures in hospitals which
result in the cancellation of planned
procedures and blocks timely discharge
for more frail, elderly in-patients.
We are working closely with our
local hospitals to see how we can
collaborate on both our service
provision and our training, aiming to
create a system-wide process to design
and deliver services for the whole
community of Cornwall and reduce
inappropriate hospital admissions,
which have an adverse impact on the
health and wellbeing of those affected.
This involves being accepted by the
statutory sector as a capable and
valued partner and requires a change
in the public perception of our sector.
If the image of the care sector is
changed, and the contribution to
the health and social care system is
acknowledged, people will be more
likely to enter into the sector and we
can prevent any wastage of resources
through integrated working between
health and social care.
The good news is that this
collaboration is developing. We are
working with the Royal Cornwall
Hospital Trust on developing an
integrated system that would mean
that patients could access our homes
for short-term care and support
without having to go through
admission to an NHS hospital.
We are also engaged in work with
out-of-hours provisions, seeing if we
can support people in their home
rather than them becoming emergency
admissions. This focus on support in
the local community will be essential
goingforward.
The key to our future will be new
workplace technology. Cornwall has
developed a Strategic Transformation
Plan which we have developed our
operating strategy around.
We are focusing on how we plan
ahead to join up services. We see
ourselves as a major partner in
designing and delivering these services
both now and in the future.
We are in talks about developing a
Cornwall-wide dementia strategy and
are establishing a common narrative so
different groups of people can access
specialist care more efficiently.
We are also looking to develop our
homes over the next couple of years to
ensure our facilities are the best they
can be for the changing needs of the
people we care for.
By creating further links with other
providers, and upgrading the physical
environment in which we deliver care,
we are confident we will be able to
rise to the challenges we face in the
coming years.
We see
ourselves as a
major partner
in designing
and delivering
services both
now and in
the future
Cedar Grange – 36 N
Chyvarhas – 36 N
Pengover – 36 N
Mountford – 37 N
Trevern – 40 N
Trengrouse – 41 N
St Martin’s – 40 N
Land’s End
Penzance
Mullion
Lizard Point
Trewartha – 36 N
Trevarna – 53 N
St Breock – 37 R
Penberthy – 34 R
The Green – 43 R
Blackwood – 47 R
Headlands – 32 R
Redannick – 41 R
Woodland – 38 R
Perranporth
Port Isaac
Tintagel
Boscastle
Fowey
Looe
Plymouth
Lostwithiel
Bodmin
Cornwall Care’s 16 care
homes
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | CORNWALL CARE
to eat and drink. The accepted medical
model that drives the assessment and
development of national care pathways
overlooks this basic, but absolutely
fundamental, aspect of good care. If
people do not have enough to eat and
drink, it has a severe impact on their
health and wellbeing, compromises
skin integrity and causes pressure
ulcers, falls, broken bones, depression,
weakness and dependency.
This often overlooked aspect of care
is literally lifesaving and is under-
recognised in national strategy and
dependency assessments. We ensure
that the people we provide care to are
our single common focus.
The dependency on others to drink
and eat is the single common theme
that connects every individual to whom
we provide care and support. It is
fundamental to physical, social and
mental health.
Loss of appetite or deviation from
normal drinking is an early indicator of
deterioration in the person’s condition.
This attention to detail for each and
every person we provide care to ensures
that we know them all asindividuals.
We are using electronic care
management systems to more
accurately record the care that we
provide. These systems reduce the
amount of time that staff spend
completing paperwork and provide us
with a strategic and auditable picture
of the level of dependency across all
of our services, as well as evidence
of how effective we are in meeting
their needs. These new systems can
be programmed to provide alerts if
someone’s needs or behaviourschange.
This gives us an early warning that
someone might be deteriorating
and requires further assessment and
intervention. The information also
provides a benchmark for their current
level of dependency and enables us to
track and predict changes, thus helping
us to design and deliver services fit for
the future.
The importance of social care
Like many other providers in Cornwall,
including the NHS, recruitment and
staffing is an issue.
Workforce issues are more pronounced
in social care, however, especially as
The Green residents’
magic table fun
The
dependency
on others to
eat and drink
is the single
common
theme that
connects every
individual to
whom we
provide care
and support
17CORNWALL CARE |
CARE
those people who work in our sector
do not receive the same recognition
and praise as their NHS counterparts.
Providers like Cornwall Care provide an
essential part of the national social care
provision and are integral to the success
of health and social care services in the
UK. This was proven recently when
the NHS in Cornwall declared a “major
incident”. A lack of care and support
for the older and more vulnerable
causes pressures in hospitals which
result in the cancellation of planned
procedures and blocks timely discharge
for more frail, elderly in-patients.
We are working closely with our
local hospitals to see how we can
collaborate on both our service
provision and our training, aiming to
create a system-wide process to design
and deliver services for the whole
community of Cornwall and reduce
inappropriate hospital admissions,
which have an adverse impact on the
health and wellbeing of those affected.
This involves being accepted by the
statutory sector as a capable and
valued partner and requires a change
in the public perception of our sector.
If the image of the care sector is
changed, and the contribution to
the health and social care system is
acknowledged, people will be more
likely to enter into the sector and we
can prevent any wastage of resources
through integrated working between
health and social care.
The good news is that this
collaboration is developing. We are
working with the Royal Cornwall
Hospital Trust on developing an
integrated system that would mean
that patients could access our homes
for short-term care and support
without having to go through
admission to an NHS hospital.
We are also engaged in work with
out-of-hours provisions, seeing if we
can support people in their home
rather than them becoming emergency
admissions. This focus on support in
the local community will be essential
goingforward.
The key to our future will be new
workplace technology. Cornwall has
developed a Strategic Transformation
Plan which we have developed our
operating strategy around.
We are focusing on how we plan
ahead to join up services. We see
ourselves as a major partner in
designing and delivering these services
both now and in the future.
We are in talks about developing a
Cornwall-wide dementia strategy and
are establishing a common narrative so
different groups of people can access
specialist care more efficiently.
We are also looking to develop our
homes over the next couple of years to
ensure our facilities are the best they
can be for the changing needs of the
people we care for.
By creating further links with other
providers, and upgrading the physical
environment in which we deliver care,
we are confident we will be able to
rise to the challenges we face in the
coming years.
We see
ourselves as a
major partner
in designing
and delivering
services both
now and in
the future
Cedar Grange – 36 N
Chyvarhas – 36 N
Pengover – 36 N
Mountford – 37 N
Trevern – 40 N
Trengrouse – 41 N
St Martin’s – 40 N
Land’s End
Penzance
Mullion
Lizard Point
Trewartha – 36 N
Trevarna – 53 N
St Breock – 37 R
Penberthy – 34 R
The Green – 43 R
Blackwood – 47 R
Headlands – 32 R
Redannick – 41 R
Woodland – 38 R
Perranporth
Port Isaac
Tintagel
Boscastle
Fowey
Looe
Plymouth
Lostwithiel
Bodmin
Cornwall Care’s 16 care
homes

www.cornwallcare.com

This article was sponsored by Cornwall Care. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development