Corstorphine + Wright

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Corstorphine + Wright's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Corstorphine + Wright is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.corstorphine-wright.com

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
9CORSTORPHINE + WRIGHT |
HOUSING
Director Michael Lampard
Nova – a premium student
residential development in
Nottingham’s city centre,
providing 434 bed spaces
across 214 apartments
Corstorphine + Wright is an award-winning architecture
practice with more than 40 years of history delivering
projects. Since its inception in 1978, the practice has
experienced continuous growth, expanding from a small, single-
office firm into a national practice with ten offices across the
UK. Directors Simon Jones and Michael Lampard explain to
TheParliamentary Review
that the practice has grown to enjoy a
national presence by leading the way in producing architecture
and design solutions.
The last few years in particular have been something of a whirlwind. We have
grown from having three studios to ten, giving us a substantial presence across the
UK and Ireland. Likewise, the team has expanded from 35 to over 200, and in order
to keep up with the pace of growth, some key appointments have been made over
the past year, including a national design director, a senior director in the Glasgow
studio and a new finance director. These strategic appointments ensure that as a
practice, we continue to deliver the very best quality of design for our clients.
Combining aesthetics with commercial viability
We have a diverse sector portfolio and are always looking to expand into new
areas. Regardless of sector, our approach and design ethos remain consistent:
projects must be aesthetically pleasing while also being commercially logical.
In every sector we work in, we know the specific rules, current thinking and also,
from a client’s perspective, what makes the sector tick. There is an assumption
FACTS ABOUT
CORSTORPHINE + WRIGHT
»Directors: Michael Lampard
and Simon Jones
»Established in 1978
»National with 10 studios
across the UK
»Services: Commercial
architecture
»No. of employees: 200
Corstorphine + Wright
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
10 | CORSTORPHINE + WRIGHT
that as architects you should be able
to create good buildings, but clients
come to us because we have a unique
understanding of the metrics behind
what they need to do to make a
project work.
We have achieved this through our
enthusiasm to continuously learn
but also by analysing other people’s
work, which has enabled us to identify
where they have fallen into traps
that make schemes and projects
non-viable. With a commercial and
pragmatic view, we always make sure
the project is feasible. Lots of clients
rely on us before they even buy a site
to see what is possible, with some
not even knowing what they would
like to construct. Because of this,
we work with our clients from the
very germination of the idea. Many
developers look at things in a lateral
way, and we help them to flesh out
this thinking, using our experience
across multiple sectors.
Over recent years, we have begun to
focus more on mixed-use projects,
which help to unlock potential
developments for our clients. Drawing
on our vast experience across a variety
of sectors, we can effectively do
this and ensure we get the balance
right. Our expertise in this area has
developed significantly, and now,
mixed-use city-centre developments
are a key part of our business.
Encouraging continual growth
Our year-on-year growth has been
recognised by a continual climb up
the AJ100 rankings. In the last four
years, the practice has leapt from
116th to 41st place, with the position
taking into consideration factors
including gender balance as well as
the traditional metrics of size and
financialresults.
Not one to stop there, we are
continuing to develop our pipeline of
The Barcode – the
recently-opened
£53 million leisure
development in
Plymouth for British
Land is an exciting mix
of leisure activities,
including an 11 screen
cinema together with 13
restaurants and a sky bar
Clients come
to us because
we have a
unique
understanding
of the metrics
behind what
they need to
do to make a
project work
11CORSTORPHINE + WRIGHT |
HOUSING
transformational projects and grow
the practice. Currently, we have
over 450 active projects around the
country, including the refurbishments
of the landmark Royal Liver Building in
Liverpool and the former international
terminal at London Waterloo, which
includes Leake Street Arches; a range
of large-scale residential schemes
across the UK; and nationwide student
residential developments for a number
of operators and universities.
The necessity of adaptation
Following recent, well-publicised
events concerning fire safety,
our industry has come under the
microscope in terms of building design
and regulation.
Clearly, in the near future, there
will be a review of fire safety in the
architecture industry. At the moment,
we don’t know where this review
will go, but as we go about our work
in a professional manner, we are
sure that we will be able to manage
anychanges.
A bigger threat to the industry is
the supply of future workers. We
have always excelled at upskilling
our team, something supported and
underlined by the scale of the projects
we take on. However, changes to
education pathways, especially in
architecture, present a challenge.
Many more students are enrolling
on part-time courses because of
the cost of a full-time degree. An
architecture degree is a seven-year
course and is therefore a huge debt
for any student to take on. This often
results in people working for us on a
part-time basis. Furthermore, many
graduates are emerging with the
necessary knowledge and ability to use
software but without experience. We
find we must mentor new graduates,
helping them to learn their craft in
theindustry.
We are excited to embrace future
advancements in our industry. Whether
these are technological advancements,
such as AI and parametrics, or
more fundamental shifts in the way
architecture is thought of, we are
ready to adapt. We believe we are
on the precipice of a new revolution.
Currently, architects and construction
companies are using the same basic
principles as were used in the Victorian
era, but we believe that over the
next 10 to 15 years, there will likely
be a seismic shift. By embracing new
materials, such as graphene, we have
the potential to change what we are
actually building with, and therefore
we have the potential to change the
entire sector.
The future is certainly looking bright
for the practice as we continue to
develop a strong platform for growth.
Our senior team are passionate and
want to retain our unique character
and culture as we evolve, grow and
win more work in more sectors.
In every sector
we work in,
we know the
specific rules,
current
thinking and
also, from a
client’s
perspective,
what makes
the sector tick
Leake Street Arches –
the newly refurbished
arches and vaults
beneath the former
Eurostar terminal at
Waterloo station create
a vibrant urban dining
destination and multi-
use areas for events,
festivals and pop-up
markets
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
10 | CORSTORPHINE + WRIGHT
that as architects you should be able
to create good buildings, but clients
come to us because we have a unique
understanding of the metrics behind
what they need to do to make a
project work.
We have achieved this through our
enthusiasm to continuously learn
but also by analysing other people’s
work, which has enabled us to identify
where they have fallen into traps
that make schemes and projects
non-viable. With a commercial and
pragmatic view, we always make sure
the project is feasible. Lots of clients
rely on us before they even buy a site
to see what is possible, with some
not even knowing what they would
like to construct. Because of this,
we work with our clients from the
very germination of the idea. Many
developers look at things in a lateral
way, and we help them to flesh out
this thinking, using our experience
across multiple sectors.
Over recent years, we have begun to
focus more on mixed-use projects,
which help to unlock potential
developments for our clients. Drawing
on our vast experience across a variety
of sectors, we can effectively do
this and ensure we get the balance
right. Our expertise in this area has
developed significantly, and now,
mixed-use city-centre developments
are a key part of our business.
Encouraging continual growth
Our year-on-year growth has been
recognised by a continual climb up
the AJ100 rankings. In the last four
years, the practice has leapt from
116th to 41st place, with the position
taking into consideration factors
including gender balance as well as
the traditional metrics of size and
financialresults.
Not one to stop there, we are
continuing to develop our pipeline of
The Barcode – the
recently-opened
£53 million leisure
development in
Plymouth for British
Land is an exciting mix
of leisure activities,
including an 11 screen
cinema together with 13
restaurants and a sky bar
Clients come
to us because
we have a
unique
understanding
of the metrics
behind what
they need to
do to make a
project work
11CORSTORPHINE + WRIGHT |
HOUSING
transformational projects and grow
the practice. Currently, we have
over 450 active projects around the
country, including the refurbishments
of the landmark Royal Liver Building in
Liverpool and the former international
terminal at London Waterloo, which
includes Leake Street Arches; a range
of large-scale residential schemes
across the UK; and nationwide student
residential developments for a number
of operators and universities.
The necessity of adaptation
Following recent, well-publicised
events concerning fire safety,
our industry has come under the
microscope in terms of building design
and regulation.
Clearly, in the near future, there
will be a review of fire safety in the
architecture industry. At the moment,
we don’t know where this review
will go, but as we go about our work
in a professional manner, we are
sure that we will be able to manage
anychanges.
A bigger threat to the industry is
the supply of future workers. We
have always excelled at upskilling
our team, something supported and
underlined by the scale of the projects
we take on. However, changes to
education pathways, especially in
architecture, present a challenge.
Many more students are enrolling
on part-time courses because of
the cost of a full-time degree. An
architecture degree is a seven-year
course and is therefore a huge debt
for any student to take on. This often
results in people working for us on a
part-time basis. Furthermore, many
graduates are emerging with the
necessary knowledge and ability to use
software but without experience. We
find we must mentor new graduates,
helping them to learn their craft in
theindustry.
We are excited to embrace future
advancements in our industry. Whether
these are technological advancements,
such as AI and parametrics, or
more fundamental shifts in the way
architecture is thought of, we are
ready to adapt. We believe we are
on the precipice of a new revolution.
Currently, architects and construction
companies are using the same basic
principles as were used in the Victorian
era, but we believe that over the
next 10 to 15 years, there will likely
be a seismic shift. By embracing new
materials, such as graphene, we have
the potential to change what we are
actually building with, and therefore
we have the potential to change the
entire sector.
The future is certainly looking bright
for the practice as we continue to
develop a strong platform for growth.
Our senior team are passionate and
want to retain our unique character
and culture as we evolve, grow and
win more work in more sectors.
In every sector
we work in,
we know the
specific rules,
current
thinking and
also, from a
client’s
perspective,
what makes
the sector tick
Leake Street Arches –
the newly refurbished
arches and vaults
beneath the former
Eurostar terminal at
Waterloo station create
a vibrant urban dining
destination and multi-
use areas for events,
festivals and pop-up
markets

www.corstorphine-wright.com

This article was sponsored by Corstorphine + Wright. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development