Depaul UK

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Depaul UK's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Depaul UK is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

uk.depaulcharity.org

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | GREENHILL LIBRARY
The first event we ran also renewed a
friendship between two people who
had not seen one another for decades;
this, in turn, led to the formation of
the Greenhill Village History Society
and the production of a DVD of
old Greenhill, which sold hundreds
ofcopies.
We also hold monthly evening talks
and cinema showings, including a
children’s film on Saturday afternoons.
We have also offered two book-
themed free summer events, the first
of which was a “Mad Hatter’s tea
party” based on Lewis Carroll’s
Alice in
Wonderland
, and the second of which
was themed around JK Rowling’s
Harry
Potter
novels.
On Friday mornings, one of our
volunteer partners provides help for
those looking for jobs and working on
their CVs. At the same time, we also
provide “story time” for preschool
children alongside an appropriate
coffee morning for adults.
These events are appreciated by many
and provide income for the library.
Alongside our consequently diverse
revenue stream, we have also been the
lucky recipients of a number of grants
to support the work at the library.
These initiatives combined resulted in
our being asked to host a workshop
on fundraising at the first National
Conference for Volunteer Libraries
in2017.
We have a vigorous social media
presence across our website, Facebook,
online newsletter and, more recently,
Twitter and Instagram. We are often
reminded of the importance of keeping
books and activities in the public eye.
Our next big challenge lies in making
the library relevant to those who live
on a former council estate, as this
demographic forms a third of our
catchment area – in 2017, only five
per cent of loans were made to this
segment, and we want to see this
figure increase.
The provision of public libraries is
rapidly changing across the country;
a bigger proportion than ever before
are now being operated exclusively
by volunteers. We are grateful for the
way that Sheffield City Council’s library
services division have allowed us to do
so with more than sufficient financial
and personal support.
According to Ayub Khan, the vice
president of the Chartered Institute of
Library and Information Professionals,
over 250 million visits were made
to public libraries last year; that’s
more than cinema and theatre trips,
excursions to the UK’s top tourist
attractions and attendance at live
music gigs combined. We are glad
to be a part of this service to the
public and only hope we can continue
beingso.
We have
opted fora
process of
rebirth to
create a new
beating heart
for our
community
The indoor section of
our farmers’ market
41DEPAUL UK |
CIVIL SOCIETY
CEO Mike Thiedke
Depaul UK support
homeless and marginalised
people across the country
The number of people sleeping rough in London, as well as
in towns and cities across the UK, is impossible to ignore.
In 1989, Depaul UK were set up to help people facing
unimaginable suffering on our streets. Diana, Princess of Wales,
recognised the urgency of their work and visited Depaul projects
regularly,making time to sit and talk to young people in their hostels.
CEO Mike Thiedke tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about the
Depaul journe y and how they’re tackling homelessness in the UK.
Thirty years on, we have provided accommodation to tens of thousands of people
who had nowhere else to go, ensuring that 4,000 people had a roof over their
head in 2018. From a single shelter in London, we have grown to deliver services
across the UK, as well as inspiring the creation of Depaul International and Depaul
Group homelessness charities across Europe and in the USA.
We know that global action is needed to tackle homelessness; every day through our
work we see that this relies on strong, local communities. Communities where, for
example, volunteer hosts for our Nightstop emergency accommodation give up their
spare rooms, each year providing 10,000 beds for the night to people they’ve never met.
Our work with young people shows how important family relationships are in
explaining why people end up without a home. This is why we prevent homelessness
through mediating between young people and their parents or guardians.
One of our family mediation services has been independently estimated to save a
single local authority more than £1 million a year, hugely reducing the financial, as
well as human, cost of homelessness.
FACTS ABOUT
DEPAUL UK
»CEO: Mike Thiedke
»Founded in 1989
»Head office in London; delivers
services in London, the South
East, Greater Manchester, South
Yorkshire and the North East
»Services: Accommodation,
advice and support for people
who are or are at risk of
homelessness, with a focus on
young people
»No. of employees: 250, with
over 400 volunteers
»Part of Depaul International,
a global family of charities
working with homeless and
marginalised people in the
UK, Ireland, France, Slovakia,
Ukraine, Croatia and the USA
»The Depaul Group is inspired by
the values of Saint Vincent de
Paul, a major social reformer in
17th-century France
Depaul UK
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | DEPAUL UK
Transitions in people’s lives are also
crucial. We work with people in prison
to make sure that they don’t face
sleeping on the streets when they’re
released, as well as delivering an
education programme in schools to
stop young people finding themselves
without a safe place to stay when they
leave home.
Homelessness is a devastating
experience, physically and mentally.
Young people often come to us with
their self-belief and dreams for the
future shattered. Our work is led by
our values, which include celebrating
the potential in people and recognising
that rights are accompanied by
responsibilities.
Our incredible progression coaches
spend a huge amount of time and
energy supporting young people
in our residential services so that
they can leave us and flourish, living
independent lives with the stable,
supportive social networks that we all
rely on.
Guided by our values, looking
to the future
We take our values from the work
of pioneering social reformer St
Vincent de Paul, who combined a
determination to help poor people
living in 17th-century France with
fundraising and organisational skills
that were far ahead of his time. We
pride ourselves on continuing this
tradition of innovation.
We are pioneering the use of social
impact bonds to support some of the
most disadvantaged young people
in the country. With SIBs, no upfront
government funding is provided;
instead, investors put up the cash and
get paid if providers deliver outcomes
for individuals.
We have just started delivering a
£2million pound SIB for care leavers in
London and have recently completed
another SIB-powered programme,
Your Chance, which focused on 216
young people stuck in homelessness in
London and Greater Manchester.
In total, 192 of those young people
sustained their accommodation for
more than 18 months while on the
programme. This was an amazing
achievement, especially when we
consider where these young people
had started their journeys. Many had
been sleeping rough in tent cities or
had been repeatedly evicted from
their homes.
Ninety-one young people moved into
education or training and 61 started
work. One young man with autistic
Helping people to
believe in themselves
and change their lives
Princess Diana was
heavily involved in early
Depaul projects
We have
provided
accommodation
to tens of
thousands of
people who
hadnowhere
else to go
43DEPAUL UK |
CIVIL SOCIETY
spectrum disorder who had a love of
bicycles was helped to find and keep
an apprenticeship in a bike shop;
this turned into a job, and he is now
financially independent.
We are also keen to expand our
Nightstop services, which currently
cover only half the local authority
areas in England. Nightstop is a truly
inspiring service, in which people with
a spare room voluntarily give it up for
a few nights at a time to host people
who might otherwise find themselves
on the streets.
Guests also have a bath or shower and
are given a hot meal and, if they want
it, a listening ear. This is made possible
by vigorous training and vetting for
hosts, actively minimising risk for all
of the people involved. We’re keen
to work with partners in government
and new donors to make sure we can
enable more people to do something
amazing by becoming a Nightstophost.
Working together to end
homelessness
Our mission is to end homelessness,
and we recognise that we can’t do it
alone. That’s why we’re going to grow
our profile to ensure more people
hear about us and our work. We’ll
also make sure politicians know about
the challenges faced by the people
with whom we work, as well as how
they can work with us to help meet
the commitments parties have made
around cutting rough sleeping.
While we’ve achieved a lot over the
past 30 years, we’re going to do
everything we can so that there’s no
need for our services in another 30
years’ time.
Homelessness
is a
devastating
experience,
physically and
mentally
»DANIEL’S STORY
My name is Daniel and I’m 21 years old. I’ve been living
at Depaul in Newcastle for three months.
Before I was homeless, I lived with my partner in
Scotland where I had my own flat and worked as a
chef. I came back to Newcastle when I was told that
my mum, who suffers from alcoholism, needed an
organ transplant.
In Newcastle, my life seemed to fall apart. My mum
got better, but we fell out and the rest of my family
backed her; I was alone. I started taking legal highs
and my life went downhill from there. Soon, all I
cared about was drugs, and I couldn’t pay my rent.
I had nowhere to go. I started sleeping rough on the
streets in the city centre.
After eight months of sleeping on the streets, I went to housing advice and they told me about Depaul UK. I
applied and was so excited when they said they had a room. Since moving here, things have been a lot better.
The staff have helped me with everything – including sorting out my benefits and finances, which has helped me
to stop shoplifting and focus on my health.
My key worker is great. We meet every week and I really trust her. It’s the first time anyone has really cared about
me. I started sessions with a drug worker and we are working towards stopping using legal highs. I’ve even
started to have contact with my mum again and I’m hopeful that this will continue in a positive way.
In the future I just want all anybody wants, really – a steady job and a nice place to call home.
We’ve helped Daniel,
21, turn his life around
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | DEPAUL UK
Transitions in people’s lives are also
crucial. We work with people in prison
to make sure that they don’t face
sleeping on the streets when they’re
released, as well as delivering an
education programme in schools to
stop young people finding themselves
without a safe place to stay when they
leave home.
Homelessness is a devastating
experience, physically and mentally.
Young people often come to us with
their self-belief and dreams for the
future shattered. Our work is led by
our values, which include celebrating
the potential in people and recognising
that rights are accompanied by
responsibilities.
Our incredible progression coaches
spend a huge amount of time and
energy supporting young people
in our residential services so that
they can leave us and flourish, living
independent lives with the stable,
supportive social networks that we all
rely on.
Guided by our values, looking
to the future
We take our values from the work
of pioneering social reformer St
Vincent de Paul, who combined a
determination to help poor people
living in 17th-century France with
fundraising and organisational skills
that were far ahead of his time. We
pride ourselves on continuing this
tradition of innovation.
We are pioneering the use of social
impact bonds to support some of the
most disadvantaged young people
in the country. With SIBs, no upfront
government funding is provided;
instead, investors put up the cash and
get paid if providers deliver outcomes
for individuals.
We have just started delivering a
£2million pound SIB for care leavers in
London and have recently completed
another SIB-powered programme,
Your Chance, which focused on 216
young people stuck in homelessness in
London and Greater Manchester.
In total, 192 of those young people
sustained their accommodation for
more than 18 months while on the
programme. This was an amazing
achievement, especially when we
consider where these young people
had started their journeys. Many had
been sleeping rough in tent cities or
had been repeatedly evicted from
their homes.
Ninety-one young people moved into
education or training and 61 started
work. One young man with autistic
Helping people to
believe in themselves
and change their lives
Princess Diana was
heavily involved in early
Depaul projects
We have
provided
accommodation
to tens of
thousands of
people who
hadnowhere
else to go
43DEPAUL UK |
CIVIL SOCIETY
spectrum disorder who had a love of
bicycles was helped to find and keep
an apprenticeship in a bike shop;
this turned into a job, and he is now
financially independent.
We are also keen to expand our
Nightstop services, which currently
cover only half the local authority
areas in England. Nightstop is a truly
inspiring service, in which people with
a spare room voluntarily give it up for
a few nights at a time to host people
who might otherwise find themselves
on the streets.
Guests also have a bath or shower and
are given a hot meal and, if they want
it, a listening ear. This is made possible
by vigorous training and vetting for
hosts, actively minimising risk for all
of the people involved. We’re keen
to work with partners in government
and new donors to make sure we can
enable more people to do something
amazing by becoming a Nightstophost.
Working together to end
homelessness
Our mission is to end homelessness,
and we recognise that we can’t do it
alone. That’s why we’re going to grow
our profile to ensure more people
hear about us and our work. We’ll
also make sure politicians know about
the challenges faced by the people
with whom we work, as well as how
they can work with us to help meet
the commitments parties have made
around cutting rough sleeping.
While we’ve achieved a lot over the
past 30 years, we’re going to do
everything we can so that there’s no
need for our services in another 30
years’ time.
Homelessness
is a
devastating
experience,
physically and
mentally
»DANIEL’S STORY
My name is Daniel and I’m 21 years old. I’ve been living
at Depaul in Newcastle for three months.
Before I was homeless, I lived with my partner in
Scotland where I had my own flat and worked as a
chef. I came back to Newcastle when I was told that
my mum, who suffers from alcoholism, needed an
organ transplant.
In Newcastle, my life seemed to fall apart. My mum
got better, but we fell out and the rest of my family
backed her; I was alone. I started taking legal highs
and my life went downhill from there. Soon, all I
cared about was drugs, and I couldn’t pay my rent.
I had nowhere to go. I started sleeping rough on the
streets in the city centre.
After eight months of sleeping on the streets, I went to housing advice and they told me about Depaul UK. I
applied and was so excited when they said they had a room. Since moving here, things have been a lot better.
The staff have helped me with everything – including sorting out my benefits and finances, which has helped me
to stop shoplifting and focus on my health.
My key worker is great. We meet every week and I really trust her. It’s the first time anyone has really cared about
me. I started sessions with a drug worker and we are working towards stopping using legal highs. I’ve even
started to have contact with my mum again and I’m hopeful that this will continue in a positive way.
In the future I just want all anybody wants, really – a steady job and a nice place to call home.
We’ve helped Daniel,
21, turn his life around

uk.depaulcharity.org

This article was sponsored by Depaul UK. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster