F3GROUP

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by F3GROUP's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from F3GROUP is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.f3g.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
14 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
Tottenham Hotspur’s
stadium, New White
Hart Lane, has finally
opened after a host
of problems during
construction
The long-awaited Tottenham Hotspur
Stadium opened in April after a seven-
month delay.
One of the most hotly watched
construction projects of the year, the
62,062-seat stadium was due to open
in September 2018 but suffered a
number of setbacks during its build.
Many of the issues stemmed from
problems with the stadium’s safety
systems, which were first reported in
August 2018.
This prompted the club to have
“urgent meetings” with construction
manager Mace, which was the leading
contractor on the works, to review
the programme, rectify and re-test
thestadium.
In September, the following month,
Chairman Daniel Levy said the delay
had resulted in “substantial additional
costs, not least of which the need for
alternative venue hire, along with the
inconvenience for our fans and those of
our opposition.”
Updates were given again in October.
The club said it had been working
with key contractors involved in the
mechanical, electrical and safety
systems before revealing that there
would be further delays to the opening
of the stadium with a new date set
forDecember.
Frustrations, however, continued into
the new year, with the club pushing
back the opening again, including a
Premier League match against their
biggest rivals Arsenal in March, which
was played at Wembley.
The opening finally took place the
following month on April 3, with a no-
expense-spared ceremony, as well as
their first game in the stadium against
Crystal Palace.
Aside from its plush grounds, the new
stadium boasts Europe’s largest football
club shop, a 180-bed hotel and 579
apartments in four blocks for which the
club has planning permission.
It will also play host to other sports,
with a sunken artificial surface
that can be removed for American
footballgames.
Originally estimated to cost £400
million, the final cost for the new
stadium rocketed to £850 million –
slightly more expensive than the £789
million spent on constructing Wembley.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to
print, the Premier League has kicked
off, and Tottenham have had an
application to increase the capacity of
their stadi um approved.
Spurs stadium opens (at last)
15F3GROUP |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Tottenham Hotspur’s
stadium, New White
Hart Lane, has finally
opened after a host
of problems during
construction
The long-awaited Tottenham Hotspur
Stadium opened in April after a seven-
month delay.
One of the most hotly watched
construction projects of the year, the
62,062-seat stadium was due to open
in September 2018 but suffered a
number of setbacks during its build.
Many of the issues stemmed from
problems with the stadium’s safety
systems, which were first reported in
August 2018.
This prompted the club to have
“urgent meetings” with construction
manager Mace, which was the leading
contractor on the works, to review
the programme, rectify and re-test
thestadium.
In September, the following month,
Chairman Daniel Levy said the delay
had resulted in “substantial additional
costs, not least of which the need for
alternative venue hire, along with the
inconvenience for our fans and those of
our opposition.”
Updates were given again in October.
The club said it had been working
with key contractors involved in the
mechanical, electrical and safety
systems before revealing that there
would be further delays to the opening
of the stadium with a new date set
forDecember.
Frustrations, however, continued into
the new year, with the club pushing
back the opening again, including a
Premier League match against their
biggest rivals Arsenal in March, which
was played at Wembley.
The opening finally took place the
following month on April 3, with a no-
expense-spared ceremony, as well as
their first game in the stadium against
Crystal Palace.
Aside from its plush grounds, the new
stadium boasts Europe’s largest football
club shop, a 180-bed hotel and 579
apartments in four blocks for which the
club has planning permission.
It will also play host to other sports,
with a sunken artificial surface
that can be removed for American
footballgames.
Originally estimated to cost £400
million, the final cost for the new
stadium rocketed to £850 million –
slightly more expensive than the £789
million spent on constructing Wembley.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to
print, the Premier League has kicked
off, and Tottenham have had an
application to increase the capacity of
their stadi um approved.
Spurs stadium opens (at last)
CEO Gavin Gleave
Colindale offices, Barnet,
London
F3GROUP were established in 1982 and have grown in the 37
years since to become one of the UK’s largest independent
development management consultancies. They passionately
feel that their people are their most important asset, with over
100 experienced, creative professionals working across the UK.
Together, they bring a range of professional experience in a
broad variety of disciplines – as well as their previous careers in
both the public and private sectors – that predominantly cover
development, professional services or construction. CEO Gavin
Gleave tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about the group’s
work and the philosophies which drive what they do.
As a professional services firm, we have all the development and construction skills
to take a project from RIBA stage 0 through to 7 – strategic definition and concept
all the way through to the use of the project in question.
We are a strategic and professional development manager; our SaP managed
services offer clients the option of an individual service, or a comprehensive end-to-
end development management solution.
We work across the UK with both public and private sector clients, and a number
of OJEU-compliant public sector frameworks within that. We provide a funding
and construction solution within these projects, and in some circumstances invest
equity into certain schemes as well – something rather unique for a professional
servicesfirm.
FACTS ABOUT
F3GROUP
»CEO: Gavin Gleave
»Established in 1982
»Based in London and Gatwick
»Services: Development
management
»No. of employees: 80
»F3GROUP has a 5-year
framework with the Royal
Household
F3GROUP
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | F3GROUP
Creating and adding value
through our company culture
Three fundamental objectives – our
vision, our mission and our standards –
drive everything we do.
»Our vision is to build a culture that
creates exceptional value
»Our mission is to create viable
environments through innovative
solutions, processes and technology
»Our standards guide us in how
we ach ieve both of these things,
working with colleagues, partners
and clients alike
We are committed to holding high
ethical standards in all operations and
lead by example in this regard. We also
make a positive contribution to our local
community, especially by developing
and retaining talent – something that’s
really important for our business.
A drive for diversity and
community involvement
We constantly strive to be a more
representative organisation and have
a culturally rich and diverse staff team.
We are also members of Women
In Social Housing, and we pursue a
number of important initiatives to
address diversity and gender equality in
the widest and greatest sense.
The sector as a whole does need to
improve in this regard. There are some
outdated attitudes, and we want to be
seen as agents for change – thought
leaders in all areas of construction.
The incentive isn’t just corporate
social responsibility, either – there’s a
commercial incentive for it in the form
of making ourselves as attractive an
employer as we possibly can.
This push to be ever-more representative
of the society around us is also evident
in our work with the community,
especially in the South West and
around Gloucester. Our CEO and non-
executive director sit on the board of
Gloucester Rugby, and our involvement
in the community dovetails well with
several of their own initiatives.
For instance, we run a SLAPS
programme that supports the lifestyles
of athletes after they leave professional
sport and the transition they experience.
We have worked on a voluntary basis
to revitalise projects with Groundwork
UK and restore and regenerate areas
within the community. This has
involved deploying teams to undertake
landscaping, painting, decorating
and gardening jobs with a view to
improving certain areas.
Hillsborough Castle
F3GROUP acted as construction
manager on the new visitor and
community facility at Hillsborough Castle
on behalf of Historic Royal Palaces.
The 100-acre project was set to improve
the castle’s visitor experience and
increase the potential for larger visitor
numbers, primarily through increasing
the amount of car parking and making
general access improvements.
The project was procured using the
OJEU-compliant Pretium framework,
created to provide easy-access and low
cost frameworks to organisations across
the UK, focusing on delivering added
value and excellent customer service.
45 Millharbour, London
Our vision is
to build a
culture that
creates
exceptional
value
17F3GROUP |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Changing the way the public
sector handles construction
The changing local government
landscape has prompted organisations
to recognise the critical importance of
capturing long-term revenue streams
– in place of traditional capital receipts
and overage arrangements – to help
subsidise and promote wider trust
frontline services.
There are various examples of where
local authorities are responding to
these challenges by adopting a private
sector mindset and appetite to assess
and assume risk.
In the assets and housing development
space, local authorities are assuming
the master developer role to optimise
their share of the development gain
and extract their returns through long-
term revenue streams.
A normal traditional partnership model
requires a 50/50 split on profit – our
delivery partner model, however,
doesnot.
Our DPM enables developments
to achieve greater viability than
traditional developer partnerships by
implementing direct delivery principles
that target removing layers of profit,
cost, duplication and inefficiency.
DPM changes the dynamic and focuses
on profit instead of income, for both
delivery and exit.
By forming a strategic partnership
with a joint governance structure,
DPM provides clear direction, open
communication, team working and
improved service delivery.
We can increase development viability
through a combination of the following:
»Layer cake – removing layers of cost
and profit
»Risk and time – reduction in overall
time frame
»Transparency and audit – control
and transparency using fu3e, our
bespoke management system
We constantly
strive to be a
more
representative
organisation
and have a
culturally rich
and diverse staff
team
Groundworks UK
» WEB-ENABLED
PORTAL
F3GROUP’s bespoke
management system “fu3e”,
is our web-enabled portal that
supports a comprehensive end-
to-end management solution
to provide a consistent and
transparent approach to delivery.
fu3e is a project management
web application, designed to
provide comprehensive project
reporting, process management
and file collaboration. Through
its simplistic interface, fu3e
ensures all members of the
project team are able to access
and use with ease.
»Income exit model – reagreed
determined exit routes, using
covenants to drive best yield prices
in providing greater benefits for the
client and the wider community
»Retaining the freehold interest
The commercial elements of this
partnership would mean that rather than
maximising value for shareholder benefit,
the local authority would gain an income
stream which they could then redirect to
other less fortunate public services.
It would effectively be using
professional services to self-deliver,
which is something that’s incredibly
beneficial in a difficult marketplace
where local authorities are operating
under budgetary constraints.
Triggering a paradigm shift –
changing the face of construction
We want to start a discussion in the
industry – rather than just hoping
it changes, we want to be thought
leaders and drive change in our field.
Perhaps it’s a good time to take a look
at the supply chains in construction
and discuss how we communicate;
collaboration is the foremost way
to share best practice, and that’s
recognised across every other sector –
why not in construction?
Disruptive relations and a competitive
industry attitude lead to its unhealthy
reputation in the public eye – that
needs to change, and we want to have
a part in bringing this about.
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | F3GROUP
Creating and adding value
through our company culture
Three fundamental objectives – our
vision, our mission and our standards –
drive everything we do.
»Our vision is to build a culture that
creates exceptional value
»Our mission is to create viable
environments through innovative
solutions, processes and technology
»Our standards guide us in how
we ach ieve both of these things,
working with colleagues, partners
and clients alike
We are committed to holding high
ethical standards in all operations and
lead by example in this regard. We also
make a positive contribution to our local
community, especially by developing
and retaining talent – something that’s
really important for our business.
A drive for diversity and
community involvement
We constantly strive to be a more
representative organisation and have
a culturally rich and diverse staff team.
We are also members of Women
In Social Housing, and we pursue a
number of important initiatives to
address diversity and gender equality in
the widest and greatest sense.
The sector as a whole does need to
improve in this regard. There are some
outdated attitudes, and we want to be
seen as agents for change – thought
leaders in all areas of construction.
The incentive isn’t just corporate
social responsibility, either – there’s a
commercial incentive for it in the form
of making ourselves as attractive an
employer as we possibly can.
This push to be ever-more representative
of the society around us is also evident
in our work with the community,
especially in the South West and
around Gloucester. Our CEO and non-
executive director sit on the board of
Gloucester Rugby, and our involvement
in the community dovetails well with
several of their own initiatives.
For instance, we run a SLAPS
programme that supports the lifestyles
of athletes after they leave professional
sport and the transition they experience.
We have worked on a voluntary basis
to revitalise projects with Groundwork
UK and restore and regenerate areas
within the community. This has
involved deploying teams to undertake
landscaping, painting, decorating
and gardening jobs with a view to
improving certain areas.
Hillsborough Castle
F3GROUP acted as construction
manager on the new visitor and
community facility at Hillsborough Castle
on behalf of Historic Royal Palaces.
The 100-acre project was set to improve
the castle’s visitor experience and
increase the potential for larger visitor
numbers, primarily through increasing
the amount of car parking and making
general access improvements.
The project was procured using the
OJEU-compliant Pretium framework,
created to provide easy-access and low
cost frameworks to organisations across
the UK, focusing on delivering added
value and excellent customer service.
45 Millharbour, London
Our vision is
to build a
culture that
creates
exceptional
value
17F3GROUP |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Changing the way the public
sector handles construction
The changing local government
landscape has prompted organisations
to recognise the critical importance of
capturing long-term revenue streams
– in place of traditional capital receipts
and overage arrangements – to help
subsidise and promote wider trust
frontline services.
There are various examples of where
local authorities are responding to
these challenges by adopting a private
sector mindset and appetite to assess
and assume risk.
In the assets and housing development
space, local authorities are assuming
the master developer role to optimise
their share of the development gain
and extract their returns through long-
term revenue streams.
A normal traditional partnership model
requires a 50/50 split on profit – our
delivery partner model, however,
doesnot.
Our DPM enables developments
to achieve greater viability than
traditional developer partnerships by
implementing direct delivery principles
that target removing layers of profit,
cost, duplication and inefficiency.
DPM changes the dynamic and focuses
on profit instead of income, for both
delivery and exit.
By forming a strategic partnership
with a joint governance structure,
DPM provides clear direction, open
communication, team working and
improved service delivery.
We can increase development viability
through a combination of the following:
»Layer cake – removing layers of cost
and profit
»Risk and time – reduction in overall
time frame
»Transparency and audit – control
and transparency using fu3e, our
bespoke management system
We constantly
strive to be a
more
representative
organisation
and have a
culturally rich
and diverse staff
team
Groundworks UK
» WEB-ENABLED
PORTAL
F3GROUP’s bespoke
management system “fu3e”,
is our web-enabled portal that
supports a comprehensive end-
to-end management solution
to provide a consistent and
transparent approach to delivery.
fu3e is a project management
web application, designed to
provide comprehensive project
reporting, process management
and file collaboration. Through
its simplistic interface, fu3e
ensures all members of the
project team are able to access
and use with ease.
»Income exit model – reagreed
determined exit routes, using
covenants to drive best yield prices
in providing greater benefits for the
client and the wider community
»Retaining the freehold interest
The commercial elements of this
partnership would mean that rather than
maximising value for shareholder benefit,
the local authority would gain an income
stream which they could then redirect to
other less fortunate public services.
It would effectively be using
professional services to self-deliver,
which is something that’s incredibly
beneficial in a difficult marketplace
where local authorities are operating
under budgetary constraints.
Triggering a paradigm shift –
changing the face of construction
We want to start a discussion in the
industry – rather than just hoping
it changes, we want to be thought
leaders and drive change in our field.
Perhaps it’s a good time to take a look
at the supply chains in construction
and discuss how we communicate;
collaboration is the foremost way
to share best practice, and that’s
recognised across every other sector –
why not in construction?
Disruptive relations and a competitive
industry attitude lead to its unhealthy
reputation in the public eye – that
needs to change, and we want to have
a part in bringing this about.

www.f3g.uk

This article was sponsored by F3GROUP. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster