Fairhope

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Fairhope's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Fairhope is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
28 | CONSULT SEARCH & SELECTION
Maintaining the edge
Overall, we are an inherently optimistic
company with high hopes for
thefuture.
We may not be able to control what
happens outside of Consult Search &
Selection, but we can control what
happens within our walls.
Our competitive edge and genuine
passion will see us through hard times,
as this is ultimately what brings success
to us and to those with whom wework.
We really believe in investing in young
talent to keep our approach fresh and
to bring new ideas.
They have added real value to our
company, and we look forward to
partnering with other organisations.
We have also just appointed a
commercial marketing role whose sole
focus is to maintain our customer-
centric values and help us get better
at understanding and improving the
customer journey so we can be the
best we can be.
Additionally, we are looking to
expand our company to around 40
people by the end of next year, and,
in short, we will move forward by
reaffirming our company values and
adding yet more energy to our already
successfuljourney.
Our ability to
provide access to
talent at critical
times is one of
our standout
features
Our charity walk across
the Yorkshire Three
Peaks
29FAIRHOPE |
HEALTHCARE & PHARMACEUTICAL
Managing Director
Kyrsty Fairchild
Fairhope is a registered care company that has provided
care in the Poole area of Dorset for the past decade.
There have been many innovations in the industry during
this time, but one of the greatest challenges in social care
today remains recruitment and retention. As an occupation,
care work is often seen as a career with little or no chance of
upward mobility. Managing Director Kyrsty Fairchild says that
this underappreciation is highly unjust given the importance
of care. She adds that, despite this importance and despite
their great ability and energy, the press still treats them
negatively. Kyrsty offers a further insight into her company and
theindustry.
Care work is not always well paid. Moreover, it is hard work; it can be stressful,
and often includes working unpaid overtime; and there is increasingly greater
responsibility with little recognition. Taken together, all of this can add up to
enormously stressful job conditions and high levels of dissatisfaction.
Huge pressure on the industry
Staff shortages put increasing pressure on existing care workers, delaying the
commencement of packages of care and increasing bed-blocking in hospitals.
This, in turn, reduces the number of operations that can be performed, which
has a knock-on effect on doctors, nurses, community workers and many others.
FACTS ABOUT
FAIRHOPE
»Managing Director:
Kyrsty Fairchild
»Based in Poole, Dorset
»Services: Homecare
»80 per cent of Fairhope staff
have been with the company
for more than 6 years
Fairhope
We are a registered care
company in Poole, Dorset
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | FAIRHOPE
Thegeneral population is also living
longer, and therefore the demand
for care requirements is at its highest,
meaning that staff recruitment and
retention has never been more
important.
Staff retention has always been a
priority at Fairhope, and we are proud
to declare that we have retained 80
per cent of our staff for more than six
years, some for longer and some from
the outset of the company. We believe
this is because of the high value
and respect that is placed on their
importance, not only at Fairhope but
in the wider community as well. Our
staff are paid well above the minimum
wage, paid a petrol allowance and
paid when a client is in hospital or
respite if the care is kept open. In
addition, their training is kept up to
date and they are fully supported and
respected in theirrole.
The Fairhope way of doing
things
At present, we use traditional methods
of recruiting staff through adverts at
the DWP, in employment agencies,
on Facebook and on Twitter, as well
as on our website. We ascertain
current unemployment figures via the
ONS and Nomis to establish areas of
unemployment in our local area for
leaflet distribution. We also attend
local job fairs and have made contact
with the Salvation Army and local
housing associations.
In addition, we have also been in
contact with the BASE team at
the local college to establish a link
between their care course and
Fairhope. We have offered work
placements for apprentices, who
work with a senior member of staff,
in a buddy system, to integrate
them carefully into a care career. We
recognise the pivotal importance of a
positive introduction to the care sector.
If employees’ initial experiences are
negative, it is highly unlikely they will
either stay in the profession or pursue
a career in it.
What we would like to see in
the future
Without care workers playing their
important role in the health and care
system, our societies would almost
certainly collapse.
As such, greater importance needs
to be attached to the role of a care
worker, and it should be integrated
as part of the medical profession
in addition to being recognised as
Great staff are of
paramount importance
We have
retained 80
per cent of
our staff for
more than six
years, some
for longer and
some from the
outset of the
company
31FAIRHOPE |
HEALTHCARE & PHARMACEUTICAL
part of an individual’s support team.
There also needs to be a clear career
pathway for those who wish to go on
to higher-paid and senior positions.
We would like to see a lot more
positive press about the role, which
we believe would make the profession
more attractive to the younger
generation.
We would also like to see government-
backed advertising and enhanced
career opportunities for 16-year-olds
at school. This could perhaps include
a pilot scheme, working alongside
the government, whereby companies
such as ourselves gave talks to children
in our local schools not just about
apprenticeship schemes, but about
job satisfaction, working flexibility and
career options.
We could offer work experience to
coincide with pupils obtaining their
healthcare certificate. Government
schemes could also offer financial
assistance towards driving lessons and
taking the driving test.
Many of those working in the sector
at present have to undergo all kinds of
torments due to uncaring employers
who don’t allow their lives to have
anyconsistency.
They are often rushing around at the
whim of managers, unsure of when
they’ll next be working. Worse still, the
payments can also be mismanaged.
All of this results in an enormous
burden for people who are already
overworked. What’s even sadder is
that the only people who would be
attracted to this industry are people
who genuinely want to do the work
in the first place – and yet it is exactly
these people who are being punished.
The incentives structure in this industry
needs to change radically.
Working to our strengths
As a business working on the ground,
we can’t control what happens
in politics. What we can control,
however, is our practices and our
commitments – which are to provide
the highest-quality care and to go the
extra mile for those who need it.
By remaining true to this ethos, we
will have fulfilled our duty as carers –
which, as society ages further, will only
become more and more important
as time goes on. All we ask in the
meantime is that those working in
the sector receive the appreciation
theydeserve.
A fulfilling and satisfying
occupation that needs
more positive media
attention
Many of those
working in the
sector at
present have
to undergo all
kinds of
torments
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | FAIRHOPE
Thegeneral population is also living
longer, and therefore the demand
for care requirements is at its highest,
meaning that staff recruitment and
retention has never been more
important.
Staff retention has always been a
priority at Fairhope, and we are proud
to declare that we have retained 80
per cent of our staff for more than six
years, some for longer and some from
the outset of the company. We believe
this is because of the high value
and respect that is placed on their
importance, not only at Fairhope but
in the wider community as well. Our
staff are paid well above the minimum
wage, paid a petrol allowance and
paid when a client is in hospital or
respite if the care is kept open. In
addition, their training is kept up to
date and they are fully supported and
respected in theirrole.
The Fairhope way of doing
things
At present, we use traditional methods
of recruiting staff through adverts at
the DWP, in employment agencies,
on Facebook and on Twitter, as well
as on our website. We ascertain
current unemployment figures via the
ONS and Nomis to establish areas of
unemployment in our local area for
leaflet distribution. We also attend
local job fairs and have made contact
with the Salvation Army and local
housing associations.
In addition, we have also been in
contact with the BASE team at
the local college to establish a link
between their care course and
Fairhope. We have offered work
placements for apprentices, who
work with a senior member of staff,
in a buddy system, to integrate
them carefully into a care career. We
recognise the pivotal importance of a
positive introduction to the care sector.
If employees’ initial experiences are
negative, it is highly unlikely they will
either stay in the profession or pursue
a career in it.
What we would like to see in
the future
Without care workers playing their
important role in the health and care
system, our societies would almost
certainly collapse.
As such, greater importance needs
to be attached to the role of a care
worker, and it should be integrated
as part of the medical profession
in addition to being recognised as
Great staff are of
paramount importance
We have
retained 80
per cent of
our staff for
more than six
years, some
for longer and
some from the
outset of the
company
31FAIRHOPE |
HEALTHCARE & PHARMACEUTICAL
part of an individual’s support team.
There also needs to be a clear career
pathway for those who wish to go on
to higher-paid and senior positions.
We would like to see a lot more
positive press about the role, which
we believe would make the profession
more attractive to the younger
generation.
We would also like to see government-
backed advertising and enhanced
career opportunities for 16-year-olds
at school. This could perhaps include
a pilot scheme, working alongside
the government, whereby companies
such as ourselves gave talks to children
in our local schools not just about
apprenticeship schemes, but about
job satisfaction, working flexibility and
career options.
We could offer work experience to
coincide with pupils obtaining their
healthcare certificate. Government
schemes could also offer financial
assistance towards driving lessons and
taking the driving test.
Many of those working in the sector
at present have to undergo all kinds of
torments due to uncaring employers
who don’t allow their lives to have
anyconsistency.
They are often rushing around at the
whim of managers, unsure of when
they’ll next be working. Worse still, the
payments can also be mismanaged.
All of this results in an enormous
burden for people who are already
overworked. What’s even sadder is
that the only people who would be
attracted to this industry are people
who genuinely want to do the work
in the first place – and yet it is exactly
these people who are being punished.
The incentives structure in this industry
needs to change radically.
Working to our strengths
As a business working on the ground,
we can’t control what happens
in politics. What we can control,
however, is our practices and our
commitments – which are to provide
the highest-quality care and to go the
extra mile for those who need it.
By remaining true to this ethos, we
will have fulfilled our duty as carers –
which, as society ages further, will only
become more and more important
as time goes on. All we ask in the
meantime is that those working in
the sector receive the appreciation
theydeserve.
A fulfilling and satisfying
occupation that needs
more positive media
attention
Many of those
working in the
sector at
present have
to undergo all
kinds of
torments

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster