Frametech Essex

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Frametech Essex's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Frametech Essex is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.frametech-essex.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
36 | FOUNDATIONS ARCHAEOLOGY
and we have recently added ISO 14001
for environmental management and
ISO 45001 for health and safety to
our suite of accreditations. All of these
help to drive the company to achieve
its aim of continual improvement.
We are also a long-term member of
the Registered Organisation scheme
run by the Chartered Institute for
Archaeologists, and all current staff are
individual members of the institute.
Although archaeology is not part of
the construction industry, it faces
many of the same challenges and
risks with regard to safety. We have
been cognisant of these risks and
are certified to a number of SSIP
and other safety schemes, including
Achilles UVDB, CHAS, SMAS, CQMS
and Constructionline. All relevant
staff hold Construction Skills
Certification Scheme cards or relevant
industry-specific certification, such
as the Thames Water passport. This
commitment, along with training and
general upskilling, has provided us
with an outstanding safety record.
Our ethos is bound up with a number
of important aspects, which can be
summarised as a company-wide drive
towards flexibility, dexterity and in-house
excellence combined with an ethical
approach to risk management. This
delivers an excellent customer focus,
resulting in continual improvement
to the services we provide to our
clients. This also helps to meet their
specific requirements, reducing costs
and shortening timescales to minimise
potential delays to build programmes,
whether we are working on a small
project or one of national significance.
This is achieved through the provision of
highly skilled and well-motivated expert
staff and reflects 24 years’ experience in
operational sustainability with regards to
quality, safety and efficiency, resulting in
a track record of proven success, repeat
business and a growingreputation.
A competitive market
The archaeological and heritage
market is highly competitive. It remains
broadly dominated by a number of
archaeological trusts, along with many
SMEs. We compete across the entire
spectrum of projects in a demanding
and fiercely competitive market. It is a
testament to our exceptional business
practice, commitment to excellence
in quality, safety and environmental
issues and proven track record of
successfully delivering projects to time
and cost, that we have prospered over
the last 24 years, while many of our
competitors have foundered.
The main challenge that the company
faces is late payment of invoices, which
is broadly the case across many other
industries. The challenges that may
arise from Brexit remain uncertain;
nearly all of the company’s employees
are British-born and our supply chain
is also almost entirely British. Our main
risk from Brexit resides in the potential
for a slowdown in development,
leading to more challenging market
conditions, increased competition and
smaller margins.
Notwithstanding the challenges above,
the company is currently working
to capacity with a healthy forward
orderbook.
Good-quality
fieldwork,
excellently
delivered, can
allow
development to
proceed while
minimising
costs and
delays to the
client
Animal burial in a
Bronze Age boundary
ditch, Oxfordshire
37FRAMETECH (ESSEX) LTD |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Bill Harris and young members
of staff
Truss roof structure,
Ashford Care Home
Frametech Essex focuses specifically on roof construction
and the customised framing of timber buildings throughout
the heart of Essex. They have been training apprentices
since the company was first established, a long-term strategy to
provide them with the workforce they require going forward.
Managing Director Andy Perkins explains the formation of
the company and how they have focused on training the
nextgeneration.
Prior to establishing the company, I had worked as a general carpentry contractor
since 1988. During that time, I had experienced a good working relationship with
some of the leading timber engineering companies. We provided a fixing service for
complex trussed roofs and became well known in that sector. I had also witnessed
the reintroduction and increased use of timber frame construction within the
industry. Because of our previous good standing, I, along with two former working
colleagues, decided to set up a company working solely in the erection of timber
structures and roofs which led to Frametech Structural Carpentry being formed
in2000.
The business was very successful from its inception up to beginning of the recession
in 2007. The following two years brought with them trading difficulties and other
complications, so the partners all decided to venture on separately.
Frametech Essex was formed in this period and has traded steadily since 2009.
To this day it remains our primary focus: we do not undertake normal carpentry
projects but concentrate specifically on the timber frame structure and roof.
FACTS ABOUT
FRAMETECH (ESSEX) LTD
»Managing Director:
AndyPerkins
»Established in 2009
»Based in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex
»Services: Structural carpentry
contractors
»No. of employees: 12–15
including subcontractors
Frametech (Essex) Ltd
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | FRAMETECH (ESSEX) LTD
Weare successfully operating within
this role but are extremely limited
by the amount of able staff that
we can recruit. In order to remedy
this, we chose to train apprentices
as we are able to teach them the
consistent working practices that
we have adopted. The downside to
this approach, however, can be the
protracted time that it takes for a young
school leaver to adapt to the necessary
skills and experience that are required
for the everyday working environment.
Retaining a single focus
A key part of our best practice is
our specialism and our focus on one
area. We operate primarily with small
developers, main contractors and
timber engineering companies from
which we have grown a broad and
diverse client base. This provides us
with a wealth of work offers and
repeat business. We do not advertise
other than through our website but
find that we have a steady flow of
enquiries at all times.
The work we carry out can often be
complex and range from a small cut
roof extension to a large-scale timber-
framed hotel or apartment block.
Whatever the size and scope of the
project, we are able to price, plan,
manage and deliver work to a very
good standard.
Having worked alongside so many
carpenters over the years, I have found
that the biggest skill gap occurred
within the roofing aspect of our trade,
which can make it a very rewarding
career if you” know what you
aredoing”.
For this reason, we find that we have
competition in this field from former
employees who have chosen to
venture on their own over the years.
This in turn feeds into our greatest
challenge which is maintaining a solid
workforce. The other problem we are
faced with is the level and consistency
of health and safety regulation placed
upon our discipline on some sites. This
has culminated in many experienced
workers leaving the industry and
working in the private sector where
they are able to go about their
daily work in a much more relaxed
environment and as they say, “without
all the health and safety politics” that
can exist on some sites.
A very
rewarding
career if you
know what
you are doing
Left: Timber frame at
Pier Lodge Nursery,
Grays Beach, Essex
Right: Cut and pitch
roof, Stepstile Meadow,
Reigate
39FRAMETECH (ESSEX) LTD |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
We have taken a diverse approach
to the safety of our workplaces as
our site-working conditions can vary
enormously from that of a small
developer in comparison to a larger
contractor and we have chosen to
teach our young members the different
methods available to working safely,
something which has been achieved
through years of experience.
This is very important as our daily tasks
always involve working at height,
manual lifting and very often working
with mobile cranes.
Due to the level of expertise that we
instil within our workforce, we believe
that an almost zero accident rate can
be maintained with our common
senseapproach.
Developing the next generation
We have instigated, and are
maintaining, a strong programme of
internal training. This has been proved
by our recent appointment of Bill Harris
to Assistant Director. Bill originally
joined the company from school and
has progressed through hard work
and loyalty to his current position. This
bodes well for the future of Frametech
as we now have a very experienced
younger member of management to
take the company forward.
Ideally, we take on apprentices when
they are 16 and it takes an average
of five years for them to attain
the required level of training and
experience before we release them to
work on their own job sites.
They are monitored throughout their
service by their local training colleges
and by us. We give them yearly pay
rises in line with legislation, but also
a bonus if they are performing well
in their role. They are helped with
expenses, tool purchase, travel and
other items like books and site clothing
during their training with us.
Ultimately, we would like them all
to stay with the company as in our
minds, apprentices are the lifeblood
of the industry which has been
experiencing a massive upturn in
workload. The CITB and government
have eventually got their act together
and placed great emphasis on training
the next generation workforce for the
construction industry. In my opinion,
this has been long overdue and only
time will tell as to whether the industry
can maintain its output over the
forthcoming years.
We are looking to continue to train
our future workforce and build upon
our current position within the timber
sector. In five to ten years, we hope
our apprentices will provide us with
a large enough labour base to drive
us forward. In terms of expansion,
we are targeting sustained growth
within our current limits. A focus on
the quality of work that we can deliver
should enable us to continue to a
successfulfuture.
Apprentices
are the
lifeblood of
the industry
Stick build timber frame
bungalow, Theydon
Bois, Essex
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | FRAMETECH (ESSEX) LTD
Weare successfully operating within
this role but are extremely limited
by the amount of able staff that
we can recruit. In order to remedy
this, we chose to train apprentices
as we are able to teach them the
consistent working practices that
we have adopted. The downside to
this approach, however, can be the
protracted time that it takes for a young
school leaver to adapt to the necessary
skills and experience that are required
for the everyday working environment.
Retaining a single focus
A key part of our best practice is
our specialism and our focus on one
area. We operate primarily with small
developers, main contractors and
timber engineering companies from
which we have grown a broad and
diverse client base. This provides us
with a wealth of work offers and
repeat business. We do not advertise
other than through our website but
find that we have a steady flow of
enquiries at all times.
The work we carry out can often be
complex and range from a small cut
roof extension to a large-scale timber-
framed hotel or apartment block.
Whatever the size and scope of the
project, we are able to price, plan,
manage and deliver work to a very
good standard.
Having worked alongside so many
carpenters over the years, I have found
that the biggest skill gap occurred
within the roofing aspect of our trade,
which can make it a very rewarding
career if you” know what you
aredoing”.
For this reason, we find that we have
competition in this field from former
employees who have chosen to
venture on their own over the years.
This in turn feeds into our greatest
challenge which is maintaining a solid
workforce. The other problem we are
faced with is the level and consistency
of health and safety regulation placed
upon our discipline on some sites. This
has culminated in many experienced
workers leaving the industry and
working in the private sector where
they are able to go about their
daily work in a much more relaxed
environment and as they say, “without
all the health and safety politics” that
can exist on some sites.
A very
rewarding
career if you
know what
you are doing
Left: Timber frame at
Pier Lodge Nursery,
Grays Beach, Essex
Right: Cut and pitch
roof, Stepstile Meadow,
Reigate
39FRAMETECH (ESSEX) LTD |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
We have taken a diverse approach
to the safety of our workplaces as
our site-working conditions can vary
enormously from that of a small
developer in comparison to a larger
contractor and we have chosen to
teach our young members the different
methods available to working safely,
something which has been achieved
through years of experience.
This is very important as our daily tasks
always involve working at height,
manual lifting and very often working
with mobile cranes.
Due to the level of expertise that we
instil within our workforce, we believe
that an almost zero accident rate can
be maintained with our common
senseapproach.
Developing the next generation
We have instigated, and are
maintaining, a strong programme of
internal training. This has been proved
by our recent appointment of Bill Harris
to Assistant Director. Bill originally
joined the company from school and
has progressed through hard work
and loyalty to his current position. This
bodes well for the future of Frametech
as we now have a very experienced
younger member of management to
take the company forward.
Ideally, we take on apprentices when
they are 16 and it takes an average
of five years for them to attain
the required level of training and
experience before we release them to
work on their own job sites.
They are monitored throughout their
service by their local training colleges
and by us. We give them yearly pay
rises in line with legislation, but also
a bonus if they are performing well
in their role. They are helped with
expenses, tool purchase, travel and
other items like books and site clothing
during their training with us.
Ultimately, we would like them all
to stay with the company as in our
minds, apprentices are the lifeblood
of the industry which has been
experiencing a massive upturn in
workload. The CITB and government
have eventually got their act together
and placed great emphasis on training
the next generation workforce for the
construction industry. In my opinion,
this has been long overdue and only
time will tell as to whether the industry
can maintain its output over the
forthcoming years.
We are looking to continue to train
our future workforce and build upon
our current position within the timber
sector. In five to ten years, we hope
our apprentices will provide us with
a large enough labour base to drive
us forward. In terms of expansion,
we are targeting sustained growth
within our current limits. A focus on
the quality of work that we can deliver
should enable us to continue to a
successfulfuture.
Apprentices
are the
lifeblood of
the industry
Stick build timber frame
bungalow, Theydon
Bois, Essex

www.frametech-essex.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Frametech Essex. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster