Honeywood House Nursing Home

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Honeywood House Nursing Home's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Honeywood House Nursing Home is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.honeywoodhouse.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | HARROW MENCAP
Adapting to austerity
Austerity and continuing cuts to public
sector funding are having an effect on
the most profoundly disabled people
and also affect our ability to support
them. Demands for our services are
increasing and so too are demands
to be represented, with more people
than ever wanting us to campaign
to highlight the growing issues they
face. These increases are directly tied
toausterity.
Another issue we face, which is linked
to the cutting of funds to organisations
like ours, is attracting and retaining
staff. Beyond wider political issues,
there is a lack of recognition and
support for workers within our sector,
and so it can be challenging to attract
new recruits. We are constantly striving
to recruit new employees, which is
something that will help to ensure the
successful future of the organisation.
Targeting further expansion
As we look to the future, we are
targeting further expansion. Many
of the services we have developed
are different and cutting edge,
and so we want to expand these
services into other areas, ensuring
as many people as possible can
benefit from them. This expansion
will be based on collaboration, and
we have developed a project, called
Connecting Communities, through
which we engage with faith groups,
banks, supermarkets and local
businesses to establish local networks
to support and engage a variety
of people, especially more elderly
residents. This helps these groups and
individuals to forge connections with
others and widen people’s networks
andfriendships.
This project was able to successfully
support 300 people and won the West
London Business Award for Health and
Wellbeing. Connecting Communities
was also recognised for its exemplary
activities across the capital by coming
runner-up for a Mayor’s Team
London Award. These partnerships
with organisations and businesses in
the locality, allied to further organic
development, will ensure we can
continue to help meet, understand and
represent the needs of as many people
as possible.
Many of our
services are
different and
cutting-edge,
winning the
West London
Business
Award 2019
for Health and
Wellbeing
Our Connecting
Communities
programme has helped
many people in and
around Harrow to
overcome social isolation
and make friends
39HONEYWOOD HOUSE NURSING HOME |
CARE
General Manager and Head
Trustee Sandra White
Honeywood House
Honeywood House Nursing Home is a charitable concern,
registered with the Charity Commission, situated outside
the village of Rowhook, West Sussex. It was established in
1954, within a converted 18th-century mansion house standing
in acres of park and woodland. General Manager and Trustee
Sandra White tells
The Parliamentary Review
that its initial aim was
simple: to offer personal and nursing care of the highest standard
to 25 older people, some of whom were living with dementia.
We provide a vital service, not only as a nursing home for 25 frail and elderly
residents, but also as employment for 59 local people alongside our work with local
companies and agencies.
Creating a family atmosphere
Our philosophy is to treat all our residents with the highest level of care and
respect, while providing a homely and tranquil environment for everyone to enjoy.
We encourage our residents to maintain their independence where possible under
the watchful eye of professional carers and nurses who encourage and promote
respect, quality and the dignity of the lives of all our residents.
We promote a family atmosphere, something supported by our staff. This was
recognised by our CQC inspector, who noted: “The residents feel safe and also
feel that enough staff are on hand to meet their needs”. Thanks to a sound
management structure, the staff are supported, and the inspector identified the
real “family” feel to the home.
FACTS ABOUT
HONEYWOOD HOUSE
NURSINGHOME
»General Manager and Head
Trustee: Sandra White
»Trustee: Paul Johnson
»Established in 1954
»Based in Horsham
»No. of employees: 59
Honeywood House
Nursing Home
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | HONEYWOOD HOUSE NURSING HOME
Adapting to financial
pressures
These are very challenging times for
the care sector, but particularly for
charity-based care services that support
those who otherwise cannot afford
care. Our only revenue is our residents’
fees and funds raised during social
events that we arrange throughout
theyear.
Crucial funding from the Clinical
Commissioning Group, which provides
funded nursing care to many of our
residents, is often not forthcoming for
12 months from the date of admission
and assessment of entitlement. As a
result, we, a charitable organisation,
are forced to underwrite the NHS for
this financial shortcoming until such
time that the funding is received. This,
we believe, is totally unacceptable in a
modern society.
The need to unlock income
streams
Our only other potential source of
funding is our land. Honeywood House
stands in 10 acres of parkland and has
extensive views of the South Downs
Conservatory. Several brownfield sites
are within our boundaries.
Over the last two years, we have
made repeated planning applications
to develop residential property on
these sites. The sole purpose of these
applications has been to secure the
long-term financial security of the
care home. Each and every application
has been refused, citing concerns
over sustainability and access to
localamenities.
While we fully accept that Horsham
District Council have to consider their
planning policy in any development,
we feel that their approach is short-
sighted as it fails to address the
overarching needs of quality residential
property in West Sussex, and the risk
to a vital public service provider.
We feel that because of our social
benefit, charity status and the fact
that the proposed development is
sited on brownfield land, it would be
possible to recommend permission to
replace existing buildings based upon
the special circumstances of this site.
Ironically, the latest application to
replace three existing derelict buildings
with four new builds has attracted a
long-term empty council tax charge of
£4,500 per year.
While we have the right to appeal
the decision, the trustees need to
apply due diligence when considering
the financial implication of such a
challenge, and accordingly have
The conservatory
with views out to our
extensive grounds
Our traditional lounge
and recreation area
These are very
challenging
times for the
care sector,
but
particularly for
charity-based
care services
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | HONEYWOOD HOUSE NURSING HOME
Adapting to financial
pressures
These are very challenging times for
the care sector, but particularly for
charity-based care services that support
those who otherwise cannot afford
care. Our only revenue is our residents’
fees and funds raised during social
events that we arrange throughout
theyear.
Crucial funding from the Clinical
Commissioning Group, which provides
funded nursing care to many of our
residents, is often not forthcoming for
12 months from the date of admission
and assessment of entitlement. As a
result, we, a charitable organisation,
are forced to underwrite the NHS for
this financial shortcoming until such
time that the funding is received. This,
we believe, is totally unacceptable in a
modern society.
The need to unlock income
streams
Our only other potential source of
funding is our land. Honeywood House
stands in 10 acres of parkland and has
extensive views of the South Downs
Conservatory. Several brownfield sites
are within our boundaries.
Over the last two years, we have
made repeated planning applications
to develop residential property on
these sites. The sole purpose of these
applications has been to secure the
long-term financial security of the
care home. Each and every application
has been refused, citing concerns
over sustainability and access to
localamenities.
While we fully accept that Horsham
District Council have to consider their
planning policy in any development,
we feel that their approach is short-
sighted as it fails to address the
overarching needs of quality residential
property in West Sussex, and the risk
to a vital public service provider.
We feel that because of our social
benefit, charity status and the fact
that the proposed development is
sited on brownfield land, it would be
possible to recommend permission to
replace existing buildings based upon
the special circumstances of this site.
Ironically, the latest application to
replace three existing derelict buildings
with four new builds has attracted a
long-term empty council tax charge of
£4,500 per year.
While we have the right to appeal
the decision, the trustees need to
apply due diligence when considering
the financial implication of such a
challenge, and accordingly have
The conservatory
with views out to our
extensive grounds
Our traditional lounge
and recreation area
These are very
challenging
times for the
care sector,
but
particularly for
charity-based
care services
41HONEYWOOD HOUSE NURSING HOME |
CARE
decided that such a course of action
is too much of a financial risk to the
home. Incidentally, this is the same
council that asked us to consider
going into partnership with the
YMCA in January 2013 so they could
lease and manage the properties by
refurbishing them to let to young
people and families so they can live in
a supportedway.
As trustees, we owe our residents and
staff the stability of a lasting home
and employment, and selling our main
asset, land with planning permission,
is the only way of doing that in the
longterm.
To have been a nursing home and to
have supported the local community
for 65 years is no mean feat. It is
something to be rightly proud of
andcelebrated.
In 2012, the nursing home was
in a very precarious financial
position. However, changes in both
management and trustees, together
with the continued commitment of
our wonderful staff, has enabled us to
bring it back from the brink.
To think that we were advised at the
time to sell the nursing home is almost
unbelievable now. Sadly, failure on our
part to secure more robust and regular
funding may force us down this route
in the future.
However, our belief in Honeywood has
brought us this far. There is still a long
journey ahead of us but we owe it to
our residents, family and ourselves to
achieve that goal.
Beyond financial issues, recruitment
can also be a challenge. This is partly
because of our location but also
because there is a serious lack of
trained nurses. The uncertainty of
Brexit is also not helping as overseas
personnel feel very vulnerable at this
time. Luckily, we rarely have issues
retaining staff, as we offer career
progression, care for them financially
and operate an open-door policy. They
are supplied with the training and
equipment that they need to do their
job safely and efficiently.
The managers and trustees have one
goal: to continue to deliver high-
quality care within the community.
To achieve this, our only requirement
is that financial streamlining is
undertaken to ensure that we can
continue to operate in our current
form. The government, local CCGs
and social services can go a long
way in helping us achieve this by
providing a realistic funding stream to
nursinghomes.
The managers
and trustees
have one goal:
to continue to
deliver high-
quality care
within the
community
Just a snapshot of some
of our committed and
caring staff

www.honeywoodhouse.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Honeywood House Nursing Home. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development