Huntingdon Road Surgery

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Huntingdon Road Surgery's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Huntingdon Road Surgery is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.huntingdonroadsurgery.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY
Dr Tony Flinn
Reception team praised
by the CQC
Dr Tony Flinn says Huntingdon Road Surgery offers the
highest standards of patient-centred healthcare to
some 19,000 local people and students in Cambridge.
With a focus on patient satisfaction and the use of technology
to streamline appointments, Tony and his team strive to
keep continuity in the doctor-patient relationship. He tells
TheParliamentary Review
how they achieve this, and discusses
the challenges they face therein.
In our last CQC inspection, which was conducted in April 2016, we were rated
as “outstanding”. In the overall summary, the Chief Inspector of General Practice
noted: “GPs held individual lists, encouraging good continuity of care, enabling
strong relations to be built up between them and their patients.”
Our message is simple: we believe that continuity of care matters for patients, the
GP team and the wider NHS. Continuity is at the heart of our core values.
We believe that continuity matters
Continuity of care is linked to higher patient satisfaction, reduced mortality and
fewer hospital admissions. This under-recognised part of our healthcare system is
being progressively eroded. Over half of people in England have a particular doctor
they prefer to consult, yet the number able to see their preferred GP fell by 27.5
per cent between 2012 and 2017.
When people feel that a doctor knows them well and understands their concerns,
we soon find mutual trust and respect. This is true for those with complex chronic
FACTS ABOUT
HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY
»Established in 1910
»Based in Cambridge
»Services: NHS GMS practice
»No. of employees: 39 – 8
doctors, 1 GP trainee, 9 nurses
and 21 management, admin,
reception and dispensary staff
»19,000 patients with our list
size growing by 1,000 patients
each year
Huntingdon Road
Surgery
31HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY |
HEALTH & SOCIALWORK
conditions and also for young children
who will be less fearful when seeing a
familiar face.
Everyone finds it difficult to repeatedly
retell their story to a new professional.
This is a particular problem for
people with mental health concerns,
vulnerability or lengthy medical
histories. Anyone experiencing a
health concern for themselves or
their family soon learns to value
relationalcontinuity.
A focus on the doctor-patient
relationship and knowledge of each
patient’s personal, psychological
and emotional context makes us
more effective doctors. Providing
continuity brings job satisfaction and
preventsburnout.
Restoring continuity to general practice
will make it a more appealing and
sustainable career. It will also go a long
way to tackle the recruitment crisis
we are facing: GPs are portrayed as
having overwhelming workloads and
little autonomy. For us, the individual
list system means that each GP has
greater control of how they manage
their caseload. We enjoy greater
involvement with our patients and
ownership of our results. We feel
valued and appreciated when looking
after an individual list of patients over
a number of years. The educational
benefits are enormous as we follow
each patient’s progress.
The loss of continuity places additional
burdens on the health service as the
whole NHS benefits from continuity.
When mutual trust and knowledge
are missing, we see uncertainty and
fear. This can lead to unnecessary
investigations and inappropriate
hospital referrals which divert NHS
resources from where they are needed.
When doctors know their patients,
they can give safer and better care.
The true cost of the loss of continuity
has not been recognised.
The challenges we have faced
in preserving continuity
Faced with increasing demand and
unsustainable pressures, doctors
have asked for changes in their
working patterns. The changes have
inadvertently made it more difficult for
us to offer continuity.
Since 2004, individual GPs are no
longer responsible for providing care at
night and on weekends. Independent
organisations now provide out-of-
hours and extended access care
and online consultations, and many
Mutual trust and respect
High patient satisfaction
Continuity is
at the heart of
our core
values
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY
Dr Tony Flinn
Reception team praised
by the CQC
Dr Tony Flinn says Huntingdon Road Surgery offers the
highest standards of patient-centred healthcare to
some 19,000 local people and students in Cambridge.
With a focus on patient satisfaction and the use of technology
to streamline appointments, Tony and his team strive to
keep continuity in the doctor-patient relationship. He tells
TheParliamentary Review
how they achieve this, and discusses
the challenges they face therein.
In our last CQC inspection, which was conducted in April 2016, we were rated
as “outstanding”. In the overall summary, the Chief Inspector of General Practice
noted: “GPs held individual lists, encouraging good continuity of care, enabling
strong relations to be built up between them and their patients.”
Our message is simple: we believe that continuity of care matters for patients, the
GP team and the wider NHS. Continuity is at the heart of our core values.
We believe that continuity matters
Continuity of care is linked to higher patient satisfaction, reduced mortality and
fewer hospital admissions. This under-recognised part of our healthcare system is
being progressively eroded. Over half of people in England have a particular doctor
they prefer to consult, yet the number able to see their preferred GP fell by 27.5
per cent between 2012 and 2017.
When people feel that a doctor knows them well and understands their concerns,
we soon find mutual trust and respect. This is true for those with complex chronic
FACTS ABOUT
HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY
»Established in 1910
»Based in Cambridge
»Services: NHS GMS practice
»No. of employees: 39 – 8
doctors, 1 GP trainee, 9 nurses
and 21 management, admin,
reception and dispensary staff
»19,000 patients with our list
size growing by 1,000 patients
each year
Huntingdon Road
Surgery
31HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY |
HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK
conditions and also for young children
who will be less fearful when seeing a
familiar face.
Everyone finds it difficult to repeatedly
retell their story to a new professional.
This is a particular problem for
people with mental health concerns,
vulnerability or lengthy medical
histories. Anyone experiencing a
health concern for themselves or
their family soon learns to value
relationalcontinuity.
A focus on the doctor-patient
relationship and knowledge of each
patient’s personal, psychological
and emotional context makes us
more effective doctors. Providing
continuity brings job satisfaction and
preventsburnout.
Restoring continuity to general practice
will make it a more appealing and
sustainable career. It will also go a long
way to tackle the recruitment crisis
we are facing: GPs are portrayed as
having overwhelming workloads and
little autonomy. For us, the individual
list system means that each GP has
greater control of how they manage
their caseload. We enjoy greater
involvement with our patients and
ownership of our results. We feel
valued and appreciated when looking
after an individual list of patients over
a number of years. The educational
benefits are enormous as we follow
each patient’s progress.
The loss of continuity places additional
burdens on the health service as the
whole NHS benefits from continuity.
When mutual trust and knowledge
are missing, we see uncertainty and
fear. This can lead to unnecessary
investigations and inappropriate
hospital referrals which divert NHS
resources from where they are needed.
When doctors know their patients,
they can give safer and better care.
The true cost of the loss of continuity
has not been recognised.
The challenges we have faced
in preserving continuity
Faced with increasing demand and
unsustainable pressures, doctors
have asked for changes in their
working patterns. The changes have
inadvertently made it more difficult for
us to offer continuity.
Since 2004, individual GPs are no
longer responsible for providing care at
night and on weekends. Independent
organisations now provide out-of-
hours and extended access care
and online consultations, and many
Mutual trust and respect
High patient satisfaction
Continuity is
at the heart of
our core
values
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | HUNTINGDON ROAD SURGERY
practices now use telephone triage to
allocate patients to the next available
healthcare professional. GPs are
now encouraged to work “at scale”,
covering bigger population groups.
Federations of practices now share
resources and provide a wider range of
services. Each of these developments
has positive features but has also
resulted in negative consequences.
The changes make it more difficult for
us to provide the relational continuity
wevalue.
Rising to these challenges
We can trace the history of the
Huntingdon Road Surgery to Dr
Fordyse in 1910. Since that time, most
GPs have worked at our surgery for
20 or 30 years, often caring for four
generations of a family. We can no
longer take continuity for granted and
must adapt to the changes in the NHS,
embedding relational continuity at
every stage.
Our receptionists and clerical and
pharmacy teams play a key role
in every patient’s contact with
the surgery, often supported by
knowledge of their context and
preferences. Our practice nurses each
have a specialist clinical area, allowing
them to provide continuity of care for
patients with chronic diseases such
as diabetes and asthma. By getting to
know their patients’ circumstances,
the nurses are able to provide an
individualised approach and achieve
optimal care.
Continuity could suffer when doctors
and nurses choose to work on a part-
time basis and so creative approaches
have been taken to provide flexible
working and a team approach while
maintaining continuity. Providing care
to a list of patients traditionally meant
that a GP was required to be available
every day. We have now adopted
a micro-team approach where two
doctors each work part-time to offer
care to a list of patients throughout
the week.
We have also created a new role to
support those doctors who hold a list.
We now employ two acute care GPs
who provide same-day appointments
when a patient’s own doctor is not
available. Not all doctors are ready to
take on the responsibilities involved in
caring for an individual list of patients
and others wish to follow a portfolio
career path with specialist roles beyond
the practice. The acute care GP role
offers an alternative career path within
a practice that values continuity.
We have been a GP training practice
since 1995 and doctors in GP
specialist training join us for six or 12
months. They have little experience
of continuity of care throughout
their hospital training and so during
their time with us, each trainee
shares the care of a group of patients
with complex chronic and palliative
conditions in order to gain experience
of holding sustained responsibility.
Many of our previous trainees now
work in nearby practices and we
aim to inspire the next generation of
GPs to understand the benefits and
rewards which result from providing
continuity of care.
Continuity of
care matters
for patients,
the GP team
and the wider
NHS
A team with a common
purpose

www.huntingdonroadsurgery.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Huntingdon Road Surgery. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development