Imagine, Act and Succeed

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Imagine, Act and Succeed's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Imagine, Act and Succeed is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.imagineactandsucceed.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | SHEFFIELD CITY HALL
They are also looking to gain a
percentage of the money from catering
associated with live performances, car
parking, sponsorship, booking fees, all
of which will squeeze the venues even
more; ironically the very places that
their members make their money from
performing live.
Other moves to counter
negative effects
They may be controversial, but
booking fees are not just an essential
income stream for keeping the
box office funded, but also for
financing the venue, its maintenance
anddevelopment.
It’s essential to build and maintain a
large customer database both as a
means for marketing our product and
for building loyalty. A loyal audience
needs to be established by keeping
the quality of all our products high;
including the actual entertainment
offering. The emphasis should be
placed on programming an excellent
product, instead of booking anything
we are offered just to fill the diary.
We have created a business
development team to programme
entertainment, business and sporting
events, and to proactively generate
new income streams and maximise the
potential of current ones on behalf
of the venue. The commercial income
generated supports the community
events and the maintenance of
the venue, which means so much
to the company and the people of
Sheffield. This business has been
developed substantially since the 2005
refurbishment.
Continuing to innovate
We can’t sit back. We need to be
inventive and creative and continue
to develop new products and
income streams, but we cannot
work in isolation. We already have
good community relations but are
continuing to build relationships with
local and regional promoters and new
businesspartners.
SIV also manages and operates
the FlyDSA Arena in Sheffield, thus
providing the ideal opportunity to
help develop an organic growth for
an artiste through their career, in
conjunction with promoters we can
move them up through the venues.
The same initiative can be applied to
conferences that outgrow the city
hall and move to the Steel Hall at
Sheffield Arena, keeping the business
within the organisation and supporting
the economic benefit for the city
ofSheffield.
The technical department is being
upgraded to offer a service beyond the
city hall to the rest of the SIV estate.
Staff and equipment will be hired
out to generate more income for the
venue and keep the service in-house.
It is a hard, fast-moving market, but
we have the iconic building and are
investing in the people to continually
drive development and look at ways
to improve our offering to stay
relevant and ahead of our competitors,
ensuring our much-loved venue
is still here for future generations
toexperience.
Booking fees
are not just an
essential
income stream
for keeping
the box office
funded, but
also for
financing the
venue, its
maintenance
development
City hall, memorial hall
41IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Chief Executive Ruth Gorman
John values his
independence and
doing things for himself
Imagine, Act and Succeed is a registered charity in the North West
that works to support people who have a wide variety of needs.
They place great emphasis on ensuring that everyone they care
for can continue to live as independently as possible, and they
work closely with local authorities to achieve this. One of their
most innovative projects is Railway Road, a housing development
in which their users live alongside general let tenants, creating a
community of support. Chief Executive Ruth Gorman explains this
inventive approach and outlines their central ethos.
The late Prime Minister of New Zealand, Norman Kirk, famously argued that all
people wanted from life was: “somewhere to work, somewhere to live, someone
to love and something to hope for”. His vision of a decent society is reflected,
unsurprisingly, in the ordinary aspirations of the people we work alongside.
Naturally, they also wish to be part of the wider community as is their right – not to
be apart from this community, as has too often been the case historically.
This is why helping to “make the ordinary ordinary” is the business we are in.
Our mission is to creatively support people to live the life they wish to lead. Active
listening, imagination, resourcefulness and flexibility are the skills that we draw
upon to help people to achieve this.
We believe that our task isn’t so much to provide a support service but rather to
cultivate the conditions for an ecosystem of community support in which people
can grow and flourish.
FACTS ABOUT
IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED
»Chief Executive: Ruth Gorman
»Established in 1988, registered
as a charity in 2011
»Based in the North West
»Services: Homecare agency
»No. of employees: 510
»No. of users: 150
Imagine, Act and
Succeed
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED
There are four chief pillars to our
approach:
Person
– we collaborate with the
person, identifying their ambitions,
preferences, strengths and talents,
working alongside them to identify
how they can secure the life that
they want to lead.
Place
– we secure and work to
repurpose buildings, partnering with
developers and social landlords to
develop quality housing that breaks
down barriers between people
requiring support and the wider
community.
Community
– we actively knit
people into the wider community by
supporting people to assume roles
and responsibilities and act as active
contributors to their community.
Technology
– harnessing the huge
potential of technology allows
us to achieve greater scale while
supporting individual choice and
control and keeping costs down.
Railway Road
Railway Road, an innovative housing
development in Leigh, Lancashire,
exemplifies our approach and its
transformative effects. A community-
spirited local entrepreneur worked with
us and a social landlord to repurpose
her office building, turning it into flats.
Typically, under the rubric of cost-
effectiveness, a social care provider
would have populated the flats
exclusively with adults with learning
disabilities who required support.
Instead, at Railway Road, people who
require support live as neighbours to
general let tenants, each of whom has
signed up to be a “good neighbour”.
This means that they have assumed their
own tenancy with an appreciation that
their neighbours have support needs.
An intercom inside each flat connects
to paid staff, should people have any
problems during the night. Assistive
technology in each flat, including door
and bed sensors plus smoke and heat
detectors, connects to the Care On Call
system, who will make contact with
the tenant in the event that they are
activated and inform our duty staff or
send someone to call if that’s required.
Joe stated that he wanted
to live more independently
and now lives in his own
flat at Railway Road
At Railway
Road, people
who require
support live as
neighbours to
general let
tenants, each
of whom has
signed up to
be a “good
neighbour”
»TESTIMONIAL
John, who moved from a three-bedroom house to his flat at Railway Road, says of his new hom e:
I really like it here. It’s close to the town centre and the shops. It’s also close to the office where I work and
the day service I attend…. My staff help me with my evening meal and help me sort out my bills and all
things to do with my flat, just like at my old house. I’ve recently started to walk to work each Friday morning
on my own, which I’ve really enjoyed. I can now do more things for myself.”
Unsurprisingly, reciprocal relationships of support have developed between neighbours. As a result, Railway Road
has evolved from a “good neighbour” scheme into a good neighbourhood. As Michelle Fury, one of the general
let tenants says:
Living here is like being part of a family. Everyone looks out for each other. That makes it a safe and secure
place to live, which is important to me. I couldn’t have a better neighbour in David. He’s so nice. In fact, all
the people who live here get along well. It works well for all the tenants.”
43IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Maintaining independence
Too often, delivering care services
at scale has come at the cost of
people losing their independence
and becoming segregated from the
wider community. Approaches such
as that at Railway Road offer a way
to overcome these tensions. All of
the supported tenants have come
from separate places with overnight
support. Now, one overnight staff
member supports all six people. As
people have grown more confident to
spend time on their own, found work
or drawn on support from the wider
community, some reductions have also
been made in daytime support hours.
The use of a private developer and the
involvement of a housing association
to oversee the supported tenancy
prevented costs being borne by the
local authority.
The combination of neighbourliness,
a light touch presence of paid staff,
and technology also attends to the
requirements of adult safeguarding,
yet at reduced cost and without the
intrusion on privacy and personal
freedom that have sometimes been
involved in the past. Sympathetic,
flexible leadership has also allowed
all of the tenants at Railway Road to
benefit from our support, not only
those identified by statutory services.
We have a good story to tell, but it is
only because we have been permitted
to use resources to set aside time to be
creative and because local authorities
have been prepared to take risks. We
have shown how we can combine
greater effectiveness with more
efficient use of public resources, but
doing so requires investment, time
and experimentation. The scope to do
so is diminished where savings made
are not reinvested, where funding
is stripped back to providing only
“life and limb” support to individuals
and where risk-averse cultures
inhibitinnovation.
People seek a life, not a service. The
support we provide is a means to far
larger ends. Continued investment
in the potential of people and the
communities we have found, in spite
of these difficult times, is something to
truly hope for.
We have a good story to tell, but it
is only because we have been
permitted to use resources to set
aside time to be creative and
because local authorities have been
prepared to take risks
Peter enjoys spending
time with friends and
neighbours and recently
started providing a dog
walking service
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED
There are four chief pillars to our
approach:
Person
– we collaborate with the
person, identifying their ambitions,
preferences, strengths and talents,
working alongside them to identify
how they can secure the life that
they want to lead.
Place
– we secure and work to
repurpose buildings, partnering with
developers and social landlords to
develop quality housing that breaks
down barriers between people
requiring support and the wider
community.
Community
– we actively knit
people into the wider community by
supporting people to assume roles
and responsibilities and act as active
contributors to their community.
Technology
– harnessing the huge
potential of technology allows
us to achieve greater scale while
supporting individual choice and
control and keeping costs down.
Railway Road
Railway Road, an innovative housing
development in Leigh, Lancashire,
exemplifies our approach and its
transformative effects. A community-
spirited local entrepreneur worked with
us and a social landlord to repurpose
her office building, turning it into flats.
Typically, under the rubric of cost-
effectiveness, a social care provider
would have populated the flats
exclusively with adults with learning
disabilities who required support.
Instead, at Railway Road, people who
require support live as neighbours to
general let tenants, each of whom has
signed up to be a “good neighbour”.
This means that they have assumed their
own tenancy with an appreciation that
their neighbours have support needs.
An intercom inside each flat connects
to paid staff, should people have any
problems during the night. Assistive
technology in each flat, including door
and bed sensors plus smoke and heat
detectors, connects to the Care On Call
system, who will make contact with
the tenant in the event that they are
activated and inform our duty staff or
send someone to call if that’s required.
Joe stated that he wanted
to live more independently
and now lives in his own
flat at Railway Road
At Railway
Road, people
who require
support live as
neighbours to
general let
tenants, each
of whom has
signed up to
be a “good
neighbour”
»TESTIMONIAL
John, who moved from a three-bedroom house to his flat at Railway Road, says of his new hom e:
I really like it here. It’s close to the town centre and the shops. It’s also close to the office where I work and
the day service I attend…. My staff help me with my evening meal and help me sort out my bills and all
things to do with my flat, just like at my old house. I’ve recently started to walk to work each Friday morning
on my own, which I’ve really enjoyed. I can now do more things for myself.”
Unsurprisingly, reciprocal relationships of support have developed between neighbours. As a result, Railway Road
has evolved from a “good neighbour” scheme into a good neighbourhood. As Michelle Fury, one of the general
let tenants says:
Living here is like being part of a family. Everyone looks out for each other. That makes it a safe and secure
place to live, which is important to me. I couldn’t have a better neighbour in David. He’s so nice. In fact, all
the people who live here get along well. It works well for all the tenants.”
43IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Maintaining independence
Too often, delivering care services
at scale has come at the cost of
people losing their independence
and becoming segregated from the
wider community. Approaches such
as that at Railway Road offer a way
to overcome these tensions. All of
the supported tenants have come
from separate places with overnight
support. Now, one overnight staff
member supports all six people. As
people have grown more confident to
spend time on their own, found work
or drawn on support from the wider
community, some reductions have also
been made in daytime support hours.
The use of a private developer and the
involvement of a housing association
to oversee the supported tenancy
prevented costs being borne by the
local authority.
The combination of neighbourliness,
a light touch presence of paid staff,
and technology also attends to the
requirements of adult safeguarding,
yet at reduced cost and without the
intrusion on privacy and personal
freedom that have sometimes been
involved in the past. Sympathetic,
flexible leadership has also allowed
all of the tenants at Railway Road to
benefit from our support, not only
those identified by statutory services.
We have a good story to tell, but it is
only because we have been permitted
to use resources to set aside time to be
creative and because local authorities
have been prepared to take risks. We
have shown how we can combine
greater effectiveness with more
efficient use of public resources, but
doing so requires investment, time
and experimentation. The scope to do
so is diminished where savings made
are not reinvested, where funding
is stripped back to providing only
“life and limb” support to individuals
and where risk-averse cultures
inhibitinnovation.
People seek a life, not a service. The
support we provide is a means to far
larger ends. Continued investment
in the potential of people and the
communities we have found, in spite
of these difficult times, is something to
truly hope for.
We have a good story to tell, but it
is only because we have been
permitted to use resources to set
aside time to be creative and
because local authorities have been
prepared to take risks
Peter enjoys spending
time with friends and
neighbours and recently
started providing a dog
walking service

www.imagineactandsucceed.co.uk

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster