John Sisk & Son

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by John Sisk & Son's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from John Sisk & Son is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.johnsiskandson.com

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
12 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
CK Asset Holdings, the group run by
the Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing, and
the housebuilder Berkeley Group, are
some of the other interested parties in
the site, reported the
Financial Times
.
This news was followed in July by an
announcement from Capco, which
revealed the group would be splitting
its luxury Earl’s Court residential
development from its Covent
Gardenestate.
Under the proposals, the Covent
Garden business will be launched
as a central London REIT, while its
Earl’s Court business will become EC
Properties. The completion of the
demerger is expected by the end of the
year, subject to shareholder approval.
The potential sale and demerger come
after years of turmoil for the Earl’s
Court development, the story of which
dates back to 2007 when Stephen
Greenhalgh, Conservative councillor,
was elected as leader of Hammersmith
& Fulham.
It was during this time that
MrGreenhalgh began talking with
Capco and TfL – the largest landowner
in the area – over the redevelopment of
the 77-acre site – a prime piece of land
in the capital that straddles the London
boroughs of Hammersmith & Fulham
and Kensington & Chelsea.
The plans for the site included the
demolition of the famous 1930s Earl’s
Court Exhibition Centre as well as the
joint West Kensington and Gibbs Green
council housing estates.
These were to be replaced with 7,500
homes, although the replacements
were criticised for not having enough
genuinely affordable housing. The
1,300 homes set to replace the
exhibition centre, for example,
contained no affordable housing.
An investment vehicle known as the
Earl’s Court Partnership Ltd was set
up in 2014 between Capco and TfL
to deliver the works, but its progress
was hampered by the local resident
opposition campaign Save Earl’s Court!
Further opposition has been seen
by the now Labour-controlled
Hammersmith & Fulham council and by
Sadiq Khan, Labour mayor of London,
who has been pushing for the return
of two council estates to the borough,
along with more affordable housing.
These woes, coupled with a major slump
in the high-end residential market, saw
in May the development lose half of its
value over the course of four years.
On May 31, Capco said its land holdings
in the Earl’s Court Partnership Ltd joint
venture had lost 10.5 per cent of its value
in the three months to the end of March.
This means that Capco’s share of the
site is worth £412 million, according to
property valuers JLL, down from a peak
of £803 million in 2015.
Set in the wider context of an acute
housing crisis that is taking place across
the capital, the Earl’s Court development
is considered by many as a case study
for bad regeneration, which has been
subject to politicalwrangling.
It is still under construction as
The
Parliamentary Review
goes to print,
with no end date to the development
in sight as of yet.
Capco is looking to
cut its losses and sell
its stake in the Earl’s
Court development
amid talks with Canary
WharfGroup
13JOHN SISK & SON |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
CK Asset Holdings, the group run by
the Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing, and
the housebuilder Berkeley Group, are
some of the other interested parties in
the site, reported the
Financial Times
.
This news was followed in July by an
announcement from Capco, which
revealed the group would be splitting
its luxury Earl’s Court residential
development from its Covent
Gardenestate.
Under the proposals, the Covent
Garden business will be launched
as a central London REIT, while its
Earl’s Court business will become EC
Properties. The completion of the
demerger is expected by the end of the
year, subject to shareholder approval.
The potential sale and demerger come
after years of turmoil for the Earl’s
Court development, the story of which
dates back to 2007 when Stephen
Greenhalgh, Conservative councillor,
was elected as leader of Hammersmith
& Fulham.
It was during this time that
MrGreenhalgh began talking with
Capco and TfL – the largest landowner
in the area – over the redevelopment of
the 77-acre site – a prime piece of land
in the capital that straddles the London
boroughs of Hammersmith & Fulham
and Kensington & Chelsea.
The plans for the site included the
demolition of the famous 1930s Earl’s
Court Exhibition Centre as well as the
joint West Kensington and Gibbs Green
council housing estates.
These were to be replaced with 7,500
homes, although the replacements
were criticised for not having enough
genuinely affordable housing. The
1,300 homes set to replace the
exhibition centre, for example,
contained no affordable housing.
An investment vehicle known as the
Earl’s Court Partnership Ltd was set
up in 2014 between Capco and TfL
to deliver the works, but its progress
was hampered by the local resident
opposition campaign Save Earl’s Court!
Further opposition has been seen
by the now Labour-controlled
Hammersmith & Fulham council and by
Sadiq Khan, Labour mayor of London,
who has been pushing for the return
of two council estates to the borough,
along with more affordable housing.
These woes, coupled with a major slump
in the high-end residential market, saw
in May the development lose half of its
value over the course of four years.
On May 31, Capco said its land holdings
in the Earl’s Court Partnership Ltd joint
venture had lost 10.5 per cent of its value
in the three months to the end of March.
This means that Capco’s share of the
site is worth £412 million, according to
property valuers JLL, down from a peak
of £803 million in 2015.
Set in the wider context of an acute
housing crisis that is taking place across
the capital, the Earl’s Court development
is considered by many as a case study
for bad regeneration, which has been
subject to politicalwrangling.
It is still under construction as
The
Parliamentary Review
goes to print,
with no end date to the development
in sight as of yet.
Capco is looking to
cut its losses and sell
its stake in the Earl’s
Court development
amid talks with Canary
WharfGroup
Managing Director, North &
Major Projects Guy Fowler
An overview of
Wembley Park
Celebrating 160 years in operation this year, John Sisk
& Son has established itself as a leading construction
company across Europe. With an annual turnover of 1.2
billion euros, Sisk is currently working on a variety of projects,
ranging from the redevelopment of the old BBC studios in
Manchester to the phase-four contract for Great Ormond
Street Hospital in London. Guy Fowler, the Managing Director
of the North & Major Projects Business Unit in the UK, tells
TheParliamentary Review
about their focus on transparency and
how they have attempted to close the widening skills gap.
Established in Cork in 1859, we are a family-owned business, with the fifth
generation of our family currently working across the company. Formed as a
construction business, we have been operating in the UK since the early 1980s, and
construction remains our core focus to this day. While some of our large competitors
have diversified into other areas, we have remained focussed on our core business.
We are the biggest contractor in Ireland and are committed to providing the
best value for our UK customers. Our focus in the UK market is centred on
developing these customer relationships. We work on a variety of projects, all of
which contribute to our one billion euro annual turnover. These range from huge
infrastructure projects, supporting the likes of Quintain at Wembley Park who we
have worked with for 12 years, and the major redevelopment and restoration of
the Royal Academy of Arts in London, to smaller specialised jobs. We are currently
working on the redevelopment of the old BBC site in Manchester, one of the
largest development schemes in the northwest. In 2017, we were awarded the
FACTS ABOUT
JOHN SISK & SON
»Managing Director, North &
Major Projects: Guy Fowler
»Established in 1859
»Based in Dublin with three
operation hubs across the UK
in St Albans, Birmingham and
Warrington
»Services: Construction
»No. of employees: 1,400
John Sisk & Son
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
14 | JOHN SISK & SON
phase-four contract for Great Ormond
Street Hospital, securing this in a
contractor-led design competition.
We have recently completed the A19
project for Highways England in the
northeast and we are active on a
number of civil engineering projects
across the country. Our project range is
mirrored in the diversity of our clients.
A focus on transparency
We have a very honest approach to
how we do things and we always work
transparently with our customers. This
involves finding tailored solutions and
making sure these plans add value
for the client. We have never failed to
convert a two-stage project from initial
tendering into a final building project,
and this is testament to both our
transparency and our reliability.
Finding the right solution for each client
means staying adaptable. If a modern,
technological solution is needed, we
will fulfil the requirements; if a project
requires a traditional approach, we are
equally able. We have a concerted focus
on digital technology and what we call
our “digital project delivery”. We use
digital platforms to show our customers
what we have planned before working
with them to bring these plans to
fruition. These platforms also help us to
determine the most efficient solutions
and streamline ourprocesses.
We measure everything that we do.
We understand the outputs of our
supply chain and work closely with
them. By treating them as partners,
we have been able to develop mutual
understanding. While, like many other
main contractors, we sublet much of
our work, the ethos of the business
means that we remain a very hands-
on organisation and are very much
engaged in the building process.
We do not have a revenue growth
strategy and instead concentrate on
driving sustainable profit and attracting
quality customers. Our expansion has
been forged by key customers and the
reputation we have developed within
the industry. This empowering approach
means we focus on finding repeat
customers and ensures that if something
is not right for the customer, we are
not afraid of saying so. Our expansion
into Europe has been based on these
repeat customers, and our partnerships
with major companies, such as Johnson
& Johnson and Primark, have taken us
around the world. By paying attention
to our customers, we have been able to
complete projects across the globe.
Circle Square,
Manchester
We always
work
transparently
with our
customers
15JOHN SISK & SON |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Driving innovation
We are continually innovating and
have recently begun to focus on
increasing the social value contribution
from our projects. For example,
we are working alongside a charity
in Manchester that aims to get
homeless and unemployed people
back into work. We are supporting
this through training programmes and
directemployment.
We also have an apprenticeship
programme that rotates apprentices
within our business and other similar
business. This ensures the individuals
receive a wealth of experience and
enables them to choose a sustainable
career path within the industry,
and it is a model we are expanding
across other regions. Beyond merely
attracting young people, it is essential
that employers do not force them into
roles. We endeavour to be flexible and
show them the breadth of possibilities
open to them. In terms of innovating
our construction techniques, we
have started to use a lot of drone
technology to perform cloud-point
surveys and are trialling robotics on a
number of projects.
Addressing the major skills gap
One of the major challenges we
face is the skills gap and the fall in
productivity associated with this. The
two phenomena feed off one another
and we have noticed, in certain parts
of the country, that rising wages
have been associated with falling
productivity. Many short-term fixes
have been employed but longer-term
solutions are desperately needed.
The right sentiment lies behind the
apprenticeship levy but it encourages
companies to push recruits through
the process very quickly. Construction
is a complex sector and one that
requires extensive experience, and
so longer-term solutions need to
befound.
Another issue that affects us is the
procurement process for public
projects. These processes often require
extensive experience in the public
sector but this presents a catch-22
scenario: as we have primarily worked
in the private sector in the UK, we
do not have this experience and we
cannot gain this experience unless we
secure these contracts. The current
processes are often structured in a way
that excludes SMEs and new entrants.
The design-led approach adopted by
Great Ormond Street, for example,
was really innovative and served to
level the playing field, measuring each
applicant on what they could do rather
on what they have done.
We aim to continue to deliver great
value and great service for customers.
We want to create a sustainable
business that will support the future
generations of the Sisk family.
Sustainability is now a key goal of ours
and this means we have to adapt and
change, making sure we are matching
the development of automation and
incorporating these new technologies
into our processes.
We aim to
continue to
deliver great
value and
great service
for customers
Royal Academy of Arts,
London
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
14 | JOHN SISK & SON
phase-four contract for Great Ormond
Street Hospital, securing this in a
contractor-led design competition.
We have recently completed the A19
project for Highways England in the
northeast and we are active on a
number of civil engineering projects
across the country. Our project range is
mirrored in the diversity of our clients.
A focus on transparency
We have a very honest approach to
how we do things and we always work
transparently with our customers. This
involves finding tailored solutions and
making sure these plans add value
for the client. We have never failed to
convert a two-stage project from initial
tendering into a final building project,
and this is testament to both our
transparency and our reliability.
Finding the right solution for each client
means staying adaptable. If a modern,
technological solution is needed, we
will fulfil the requirements; if a project
requires a traditional approach, we are
equally able. We have a concerted focus
on digital technology and what we call
our “digital project delivery”. We use
digital platforms to show our customers
what we have planned before working
with them to bring these plans to
fruition. These platforms also help us to
determine the most efficient solutions
and streamline ourprocesses.
We measure everything that we do.
We understand the outputs of our
supply chain and work closely with
them. By treating them as partners,
we have been able to develop mutual
understanding. While, like many other
main contractors, we sublet much of
our work, the ethos of the business
means that we remain a very hands-
on organisation and are very much
engaged in the building process.
We do not have a revenue growth
strategy and instead concentrate on
driving sustainable profit and attracting
quality customers. Our expansion has
been forged by key customers and the
reputation we have developed within
the industry. This empowering approach
means we focus on finding repeat
customers and ensures that if something
is not right for the customer, we are
not afraid of saying so. Our expansion
into Europe has been based on these
repeat customers, and our partnerships
with major companies, such as Johnson
& Johnson and Primark, have taken us
around the world. By paying attention
to our customers, we have been able to
complete projects across the globe.
Circle Square,
Manchester
We always
work
transparently
with our
customers
15JOHN SISK & SON |
CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING
Driving innovation
We are continually innovating and
have recently begun to focus on
increasing the social value contribution
from our projects. For example,
we are working alongside a charity
in Manchester that aims to get
homeless and unemployed people
back into work. We are supporting
this through training programmes and
directemployment.
We also have an apprenticeship
programme that rotates apprentices
within our business and other similar
business. This ensures the individuals
receive a wealth of experience and
enables them to choose a sustainable
career path within the industry,
and it is a model we are expanding
across other regions. Beyond merely
attracting young people, it is essential
that employers do not force them into
roles. We endeavour to be flexible and
show them the breadth of possibilities
open to them. In terms of innovating
our construction techniques, we
have started to use a lot of drone
technology to perform cloud-point
surveys and are trialling robotics on a
number of projects.
Addressing the major skills gap
One of the major challenges we
face is the skills gap and the fall in
productivity associated with this. The
two phenomena feed off one another
and we have noticed, in certain parts
of the country, that rising wages
have been associated with falling
productivity. Many short-term fixes
have been employed but longer-term
solutions are desperately needed.
The right sentiment lies behind the
apprenticeship levy but it encourages
companies to push recruits through
the process very quickly. Construction
is a complex sector and one that
requires extensive experience, and
so longer-term solutions need to
befound.
Another issue that affects us is the
procurement process for public
projects. These processes often require
extensive experience in the public
sector but this presents a catch-22
scenario: as we have primarily worked
in the private sector in the UK, we
do not have this experience and we
cannot gain this experience unless we
secure these contracts. The current
processes are often structured in a way
that excludes SMEs and new entrants.
The design-led approach adopted by
Great Ormond Street, for example,
was really innovative and served to
level the playing field, measuring each
applicant on what they could do rather
on what they have done.
We aim to continue to deliver great
value and great service for customers.
We want to create a sustainable
business that will support the future
generations of the Sisk family.
Sustainability is now a key goal of ours
and this means we have to adapt and
change, making sure we are matching
the development of automation and
incorporating these new technologies
into our processes.
We aim to
continue to
deliver great
value and
great service
for customers
Royal Academy of Arts,
London

www.johnsiskandson.com

This article was sponsored by John Sisk & Son. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster