Journeyman Pictures

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Journeyman Pictures's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Journeyman Pictures is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.journeyman.tv

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
36 | JOURNEYMAN PICTURES
Managing Director Mark Stucke
A selection of Journeyman
Pictures’ top documentary titles
Journeyman Pictures supplies documentaries and current
affairs programmes to a wide range of broadcasters and
digital platforms. Originally focusing on the production
of war zone and harsh environment reports, they have since
diversified and act as a medium between individual filmmakers
and the global markets, as well as direct consumers. In order to
raise their profile, they were one of the first British organisations
to negotiate a partnership with YouTube, and their channel
now has over 1.2 million subscribers. Managing Director
Mark Stucke, a former war reporter himself, explains the
complications of adapting to the digital age and the methods
they employ to reach audiences around the world.
We offer three distinct product lines: documentaries, current affairs coverage and
the provision of video clips for productions. We act as a sales agency for some
of the most significant news producers worldwide, including PBS’s NewsHour
Weekend, Al Jazeera, BBC Arabic and ABC Australia. While Europe is mostly our
centre of gravity, all the world’s most significant TV stations regularly use our
services to acquire factual content. Over the last five years, we have developed
expertise in the digital sector, with thousands of our documentaries streamed to
a worldwide audience everyday through iTunes, Amazon and Google Play, all of
whom we are directly licensed with.
I began my career as a war journalist and was one of the first freelancers to adopt
small digital technology. Thanks to this technology, anyone could cheaply purchase
the equipment and, with the right skills, produce a film of a quality high enough to
FACTS ABOUT
JOURNEYMAN PICTURES
»Managing Director:
MarkStucke
»Established in 1990
»Based in Surrey
»Services: Documentary
and current affairs content
distribution
»No. of employees: 15
»In the last year, 6,213,820
hours of Journeyman’s
content was watched on
Amazon
Journeyman Pictures
37JOURNEYMAN PICTURES |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
achieve mainstream broadcast. This is
how the company began in 1990, as a
producer of reports and documentaries
from the world’s war zones. Originally,
Channel 4 was our main supporter,
but we went on to work with many of
the major international networks.
Our ambition grew as we moved more
into TV and feature documentaries,
immediately recognising the central
importance and value of copyright. It
was the experience of marketing and
selling our own content around the
world that really established us as a
distributor. As our company developed
and our revenue stream for our own
content grew, producers came to us to
sell their content too.
Adapting to the digital age
I always knew that the digital age
would require us to find a direct
route to the documentary consumer.
Where previously our audience had
been reached via TV broadcasters,
we could see that the market was
becoming more commercially driven,
as increasing competition pushed
broadcasters to focus on more
populist content. The obvious loser
of this change was serious factual
programming, and our survival relied
on finding the means to reach our
demographic directly. We’ve achieved
this with regular “day and date” global
digital releases, thereby enabling
us to become like a TV channel
with scheduled releases, in a sector
that’s increasingly only viable on a
worldwidescale.
When Google purchased YouTube,
we realised that it would become
a valuable promotional tool for our
content. We were one of the first
British organisations to negotiate a
YouTube partnership, and today our
channel is one of the top ten news
and politics channels on the platform,
with a rapidly increasing subscriber
base of over 1.2 million. This platform
is now central to the promotion
and distribution of our films to both
public consumers and our industry
clientbase.
More recently, we’ve become one of
the smallest independent companies
in the world to secure direct output
contracts with iTunes, Amazon and
Google Play. This disrupted the
way distributors have traditionally
accessed the main digital platforms, as
previously this had only been achieved
by delivering video content to these
platforms via a small number of select
third parties. This method adds further
layers of costs and commissions,
reducing the returns the copyright
holders receive. It also limits the ability
to manage the release of a film on
these platforms in a tactileway.
The challenges of the digital
market
Today, the digital market accounts for
half of our revenue model, and this is
increasing. The growth and visibility
of our YouTube channel have enabled
us to develop a global presence. The
success of our promotion through
YouTube and various social media
platforms, such as Instagram, Facebook
and Twitter, is appreciated by the
major platforms, as we channel our
followers directly to their rental pages
via transactional links. The digitisation
£125,000
£100,000
£75,000
Date
July
2015
January
2016
July
2016
January
2017
July
2017
January
2018
July
2018
£50,000
£25,000
Monthly Revenue
£0
Growth in digital
revenue, 2015 to 2018
I always knew
that the digital
age would
require us to
find a direct
route to the
documentary
consumer
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
36 | JOURNEYMAN PICTURES
Managing Director Mark Stucke
A selection of Journeyman
Pictures’ top documentary titles
Journeyman Pictures supplies documentaries and current
affairs programmes to a wide range of broadcasters and
digital platforms. Originally focusing on the production
of war zone and harsh environment reports, they have since
diversified and act as a medium between individual filmmakers
and the global markets, as well as direct consumers. In order to
raise their profile, they were one of the first British organisations
to negotiate a partnership with YouTube, and their channel
now has over 1.2 million subscribers. Managing Director
Mark Stucke, a former war reporter himself, explains the
complications of adapting to the digital age and the methods
they employ to reach audiences around the world.
We offer three distinct product lines: documentaries, current affairs coverage and
the provision of video clips for productions. We act as a sales agency for some
of the most significant news producers worldwide, including PBS’s NewsHour
Weekend, Al Jazeera, BBC Arabic and ABC Australia. While Europe is mostly our
centre of gravity, all the world’s most significant TV stations regularly use our
services to acquire factual content. Over the last five years, we have developed
expertise in the digital sector, with thousands of our documentaries streamed to
a worldwide audience everyday through iTunes, Amazon and Google Play, all of
whom we are directly licensed with.
I began my career as a war journalist and was one of the first freelancers to adopt
small digital technology. Thanks to this technology, anyone could cheaply purchase
the equipment and, with the right skills, produce a film of a quality high enough to
FACTS ABOUT
JOURNEYMAN PICTURES
»Managing Director:
MarkStucke
»Established in 1990
»Based in Surrey
»Services: Documentary
and current affairs content
distribution
»No. of employees: 15
»In the last year, 6,213,820
hours of Journeyman’s
content was watched on
Amazon
Journeyman Pictures
37JOURNEYMAN PICTURES |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
achieve mainstream broadcast. This is
how the company began in 1990, as a
producer of reports and documentaries
from the world’s war zones. Originally,
Channel 4 was our main supporter,
but we went on to work with many of
the major international networks.
Our ambition grew as we moved more
into TV and feature documentaries,
immediately recognising the central
importance and value of copyright. It
was the experience of marketing and
selling our own content around the
world that really established us as a
distributor. As our company developed
and our revenue stream for our own
content grew, producers came to us to
sell their content too.
Adapting to the digital age
I always knew that the digital age
would require us to find a direct
route to the documentary consumer.
Where previously our audience had
been reached via TV broadcasters,
we could see that the market was
becoming more commercially driven,
as increasing competition pushed
broadcasters to focus on more
populist content. The obvious loser
of this change was serious factual
programming, and our survival relied
on finding the means to reach our
demographic directly. We’ve achieved
this with regular “day and date” global
digital releases, thereby enabling
us to become like a TV channel
with scheduled releases, in a sector
that’s increasingly only viable on a
worldwidescale.
When Google purchased YouTube,
we realised that it would become
a valuable promotional tool for our
content. We were one of the first
British organisations to negotiate a
YouTube partnership, and today our
channel is one of the top ten news
and politics channels on the platform,
with a rapidly increasing subscriber
base of over 1.2 million. This platform
is now central to the promotion
and distribution of our films to both
public consumers and our industry
clientbase.
More recently, we’ve become one of
the smallest independent companies
in the world to secure direct output
contracts with iTunes, Amazon and
Google Play. This disrupted the
way distributors have traditionally
accessed the main digital platforms, as
previously this had only been achieved
by delivering video content to these
platforms via a small number of select
third parties. This method adds further
layers of costs and commissions,
reducing the returns the copyright
holders receive. It also limits the ability
to manage the release of a film on
these platforms in a tactileway.
The challenges of the digital
market
Today, the digital market accounts for
half of our revenue model, and this is
increasing. The growth and visibility
of our YouTube channel have enabled
us to develop a global presence. The
success of our promotion through
YouTube and various social media
platforms, such as Instagram, Facebook
and Twitter, is appreciated by the
major platforms, as we channel our
followers directly to their rental pages
via transactional links. The digitisation
£125,000
£100,000
£75,000
Date
July
2015
January
2016
July
2016
January
2017
July
2017
January
2018
July
2018
£50,000
£25,000
Monthly Revenue
£0
Growth in digital
revenue, 2015 to 2018
I always knew
that the digital
age would
require us to
find a direct
route to the
documentary
consumer
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | JOURNEYMAN PICTURES
of video content also allows us to offer
the purchase and delivery of our films
to customers directly via our website,
for private and educational use, public
screenings and community events. The
costly challenge we face is to produce
good-quality digital copies of the older
content in our library, which goes
back 25 years and is still largely stored
ontape.
The market is going to become
increasingly digitally focused, but
challenges remain. Two years ago,
iTunes constituted 80 per cent of our
digital market, and today they are less
than ten per cent. Similarly, Netflix
was our biggest single customer two
years ago, yet as they increasingly
focus on producing original content,
we’ve seen a drop in their acquisitions.
It is essential that we stay vigilant in
the marketplace and remain on top of
every development that happens, such
as Apple opening up their applications
to be used on non-Apple products
or Google revamping their video-on-
demand platforms.
We are not significantly affected
by Ofcom or similar regulators, as
currently the regulatory world is not
very concerned about high-quality
documentaries or current affairs
programmes. We were concerned,
however, when Ofcom began to
look at companies like us for licence
fees, treating us as if we were
a broadcaster. A governmental
discussion followed, which recognised
the growth of the digital community,
and for a few years we had to pay
a few thousand pounds a year.
Despite this, the fees were never too
burdensome and are understandable,
as the marginal sector we are involved
in is still being formed.
As we look forward, we are
endeavouring to expand our audience
base to reach the public further
afield and those outside of our core
market. This involves various issues,
including language localisation of our
content, international regulations and
a shrinking, unpredictable broadcast
market as TV broadcasters find a place
alongside the VOD phenomenon. We
have already seen impressive growth
in territories further afield, especially
China, yet we only currently access
about ten per cent of our potential
global market. Our future growth is
going to be defined by how we target
the remaining 90 per cent.
We have
already seen
impressive
growth in
territories
further afield
Journeyman Pictures’
YouTube channel
39THE TYTHE BARN, LAUNTON |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Director Emma Deeley
Historically, the barn was used as
the lambing barn and cattle shelter
The Tythe Barn is set on a workingfarm in Oxfordshire that
has embraced the wedding industry since 1998. Weddings
now make up 90 per cent of the business and while the
barn does also host corporate events, it is as a wedding venue
that it has become mostwell known. When Will and Emma
Deeley saw that the farm was facing a difficult future, they
noticed the potential of the location as a venue. Following a
series of renovations, the business has grown quickly. Emma tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about how this was all possible.
The company was founded 20 years ago when werecognisedthat the barn
was becoming increasingly redundant initsrole as a lambing barn on the family
farm.Following a careful restoration, the impromptu wedding of Will’s older
brother Peter in the barn set the path for a future wedding venue.Will and I met at
university in 1988, and with our combined creative vision, passion for style and eye
for detail, we have been able to take the business from strength to strength.
Historically, The Tythe Barn was used as the lambing barn and cattle shelter for the
Deeley family farm, which has been owned by Will’s family for over 500 years.Will
grew up working on the farm and has always been passionate about his roots,
and so rural diversification, from lambing barn to venue, seemed a natural step,
particularly given our central location and easy access to transport links – our clients
come from all over the country and abroad.
Our pricing structure places us at the higher end of the wedding venue category and
this was an intentional move as well as a necessary and practical one. We are acutely
aware that our role is to understand, support and connect with all of our couples,
FACTS ABOUT
THE TYTHE BARN, LAUNTON
»Director: Emma Deeley
»Founded in 1998
»Based in Launton, Oxfordshire
»Services: Wedding venue,
corporate events and private
party hire
»No. of employees: 23
»www.thetythebarn.co.uk
The Tythe Barn,
Launton

www.journeyman.tv

This article was sponsored by Journeyman Pictures. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster