Kimberley Care Home

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Kimberley Care Home's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Kimberley Care Home is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.pearlhealthcare.com/kimberley-care-village

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | ROSE CARE FELIXSTOWE
Adapting and evolving
Over the years, we have recognised
the need to evolve and adapt to these
changes and challenges in order to
maintain the same level of service
our clients expect. As an illustrative
example, in 2018, the organisation
introduced The Rose Care Club. The
initiative saw the introduction of
optional, small-scale social events for
our clients to participate in such as a
trip to the pub for a drink one evening,
the theatre, a drive in the countryside
or simply going out for a coffee – all
ordinary things that most of us take for
granted yet which aren’t always easy
for the more vulnerable in our society
to do on their own. These outings have
proved popular with our clients and
it has been wonderful to see those
taking part getting to know each
other and building unexpected but
welcome friendships. We are proud of
the part we have played in bringing
these otherwise fairly isolated people
together and providing a platform for
friendships to develop.
We have developed an integrated
scheduling tool accessible by all carers
and, in the future, by clients. This will
create a real-time communication
channel for all parties involved in the
care contract. A further development
includes the new website, due to
go live this year, which will see the
introduction of new content and a
number of new features, including a
new chat facility.
In order to maintain the company’s
integration into the community,
we also look for opportunities to
contribute, participate or support local
events and activities. For instance, our
staff joined with community groups
and other businesses at the Pier for
Suffolk Day to sing the Suffolk Song.
In addition, the company strives to
support the community Christmas
lights and has involvement in
localcarnivals.
We continue to strive to be the best
in our field, while focusing on the
community we serve. We are proud to
serve the people of Felixstowe and the
surrounding villages and will continue
to positively support our clients to
help them stay at home and to live
the fullest life they can – something
that we have successfully done for the
last 25 years, and will continue for
manymore.
We are proud
to serve the
people of
Felixstowe and
the
surrounding
villages
Dedicated and
compassionate
33KIMBERLEY CARE HOME |
CARE
Home Manager Nadine Vail
Team and residents having fun
searching for their inner Picasso
Between 2017 and 2019, 16 care homes closed in
Lincolnshire. For individuals wanting to remain at home
for as long as possible, this was made more difficult by
the closure of 21 domiciliary agencies. Cuts also meant the
county had fewer accessible services for community care.
Kimberley Care, a Pearl Healthcare home, is led by Home
Manager Nadine Vail, who tells
The Parliamentary Review
that
Kimberley has 65 bedrooms, from which it provides more than
1,800 hours of care a week, through the dedicated efforts of
70 members of staff. Based in the small market town of Long
Sutton, the multidisciplinary home focuses on specialist care
packages that are tailor-made for each service user. Nadine
discusses the state of the adult social care sector and what
Kimberley Care is doing to help.
The world of social care continues to evolve at an astonishing pace, and the
changing landscape means care providers are constantly challenged to think ahead
and differentiate in terms of service provision. Offering an exceptional standard
of “person-centred” care is no longer the only consideration for forward-thinking
providers: we must also aim to add greater scope to our value. With plans for
future on-site surgeries housing GPs and district nurses, specialised facilities for
oxygen dependency and respite units for families wanting short-term care for their
loved ones, flexibility of provision is key if a site wishes to ensure that its services
react to rising care needs and consumer demands.
FACTS ABOUT
KIMBERLEY CARE HOME
»Home Manager: Nadine Vail
»Established in 1992
»Based in Long Sutton,
Lincolnshire
»Services: Multidisciplinary care
home
»No. of employees: 70
»Nadine is a care quality
advocate with over 30 years
of care expertise delivering,
developing and inspiring care
teams to achieve their
potential through continuous
improvement and challenging
the status quo
Kimberley Care Home
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
34 | KIMBERLEY CARE HOME
Balancing quality of service with
the amount of funding received
continues to prove difficult for many,
particularly as there are fewer low-
needs residential clients coming
through care home doors today. This
is exacerbated by the fact that people
are living longer and want to retain
their independence and remain in
their homes for as long as possible.
As a consequence, those who require
care are often more elderly, with more
complex, high-dependency needs and
multiple conditions.
Funding does not always
reflect the level of care
A decade ago, those with high-
dependency needs were likely to be
referred to a nursing home, but as
these are in decline, residential care
homes are now facing an influx of
elderly people with more complex
needs while not necessarily being
skilled or appropriately equipped to
manage such needs. This also presents
a deeper issue, as often the funding
allocated isn’t reflective of the intricate
care involved. Therefore, providers
must diversify their services and find
new ways of generating funding if
they are to consistently deliver quality,
embrace best practice and thrive in
thefuture.
New regulation means care teams have
had to become more proactive in the
way they audit the quality of care they
deliver. Previously, care providers had
greater freedom over reporting quality
of service and how they interpreted the
evidence collected. Now, they have to
independently present the evidence to
support what they do on a daily basis
and this has to meet the regulatory
requirements. As such, care home
managers need to be much more
creative and skilled in their ability to
self-audit in order to present sufficient
evidence and meet the expected levels
of compliance, while developing and
leading a team in an environment of
continuous improvement.
Managers have a duty of care
to their staff
The recruitment and retention of
qualified, good-quality and skilled
staff is a struggle for the industry.
Investment in upskilling staff is vital
because as a manager you need a
loyal and robust core team around
you. Often the sector is guilty of
recruiting good people, who later
lose the confidence to think on their
feet or to problem-solve because they
haven’t been given the right support
or learning opportunities. Managers
have a responsibility to ensure that
staff are consistently supported, have
the right development opportunities
and are equipped to deliver the best
possibleservice.
As a sector, we often talk about a
people-centred approach, but this
ethos has to be replicated across
the board. Care teams also need to
appreciate that the care they provide
belongs to the resident and that
means they have the right to be in
control of what that care looks like.
Life is to be celebrated
at any age
The world of
social care
continues to
evolve at an
astonishing
pace
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
34 | KIMBERLEY CARE HOME
Balancing quality of service with
the amount of funding received
continues to prove difficult for many,
particularly as there are fewer low-
needs residential clients coming
through care home doors today. This
is exacerbated by the fact that people
are living longer and want to retain
their independence and remain in
their homes for as long as possible.
As a consequence, those who require
care are often more elderly, with more
complex, high-dependency needs and
multiple conditions.
Funding does not always
reflect the level of care
A decade ago, those with high-
dependency needs were likely to be
referred to a nursing home, but as
these are in decline, residential care
homes are now facing an influx of
elderly people with more complex
needs while not necessarily being
skilled or appropriately equipped to
manage such needs. This also presents
a deeper issue, as often the funding
allocated isn’t reflective of the intricate
care involved. Therefore, providers
must diversify their services and find
new ways of generating funding if
they are to consistently deliver quality,
embrace best practice and thrive in
thefuture.
New regulation means care teams have
had to become more proactive in the
way they audit the quality of care they
deliver. Previously, care providers had
greater freedom over reporting quality
of service and how they interpreted the
evidence collected. Now, they have to
independently present the evidence to
support what they do on a daily basis
and this has to meet the regulatory
requirements. As such, care home
managers need to be much more
creative and skilled in their ability to
self-audit in order to present sufficient
evidence and meet the expected levels
of compliance, while developing and
leading a team in an environment of
continuous improvement.
Managers have a duty of care
to their staff
The recruitment and retention of
qualified, good-quality and skilled
staff is a struggle for the industry.
Investment in upskilling staff is vital
because as a manager you need a
loyal and robust core team around
you. Often the sector is guilty of
recruiting good people, who later
lose the confidence to think on their
feet or to problem-solve because they
haven’t been given the right support
or learning opportunities. Managers
have a responsibility to ensure that
staff are consistently supported, have
the right development opportunities
and are equipped to deliver the best
possibleservice.
As a sector, we often talk about a
people-centred approach, but this
ethos has to be replicated across
the board. Care teams also need to
appreciate that the care they provide
belongs to the resident and that
means they have the right to be in
control of what that care looks like.
Life is to be celebrated
at any age
The world of
social care
continues to
evolve at an
astonishing
pace
35KIMBERLEY CARE HOME |
CARE
It’saboutempowering people: if it
means speaking to their close families
to ensure they receive the care they
would have asked for, had they have
been physically or mentally able to, then
care teams must ensure that happens.
Building a network of
professional relationships
Supplying the best level of care means
connecting with the outside world
too. From medical professionals, GPs
and district nurses to paramedics, local
authority teams and the general care
community, people and relationships
matter. We have spent many years
nurturing strong relationships with
the external professional community
with the aim of amplifying the quality
of the services we offer. For instance,
seeking advice when needed and
taking guidance from GPs has helped
us to forge a trusted and credible
local network of individuals, who
have in turn become ambassadors for
thehome.
Having the support of medical
professionals who can confidently
recommend us is great for our
reputation and further showcases
our ability to deliver the best highest-
quality care.
Forging external partnerships
To manage the increasing complexity
and challenges, building external
partnerships is also a positive step
for care providers. We work directly
with Care 4 Quality, an industry body
that supports care homes by helping
them devise and manage their quality
care procedures and best practice-
led frameworks. From formulating a
quality care plan to monitoring and
carrying out impartial assessment
for continuous improvement
and performance, independent
partnerships like these are invaluable
both from a provision of service and a
commercial perspective.
Helen Fuller, Managing Director at
Care 4 Quality, believes that most
care providers have good awareness
of what quality means and why it is
important for them commercially,
but says they often need support in
locating the correlation between that
intent and the ability to execute it in
practice on a daily basis. Preparing
for an ever-changing world, we have
been proactive in seeking a long-term
partnership with Care 4 Quality to
improve and sustain compliance within
its services. This is where embracing
external support really can make all the
difference in navigating the complex
landscape that lies ahead.
Embracing
external
support really
can make all
the difference
in navigating
the complex
landscape that
lies ahead
» ABOUT CARE 4 QUALITY
(WWW.CARE4QUALITY.CO.UK)
Care 4 Quality supports over 500 UK-based care providers in
achieving and surpassing regulatory expectations to enable them to
focus and drive improvement within their service through audits and
support. It gives providers the
opportunities to work in partnership,
enabling them to diversify while remaining
focused on their care proposition as a
whole. This, in turn, allows services to
showcase their provision to regulators and
local communities and to become an
exceptional place to live and work.
Hard work and success
recognised

www.pearlhealthcare.com/kimberley-care-village

This article was sponsored by Kimberley Care Home. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development