Kingsbury Green Academy

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Kingsbury Green Academy's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Kingsbury Green Academy is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.kingsburygreenacademy.com

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY
Headteacher Jason Tudor
The enviably beautiful location
of Kingsbury Green Academy
Kingsbury Green Academy is a brand-new school and sixth
form established in September 2019, serving the Wiltshire
town of Calne and the surrounding villages. Previously
named the John Bentley School, the school can trace its roots
back to 1663, as the first school in Calne, known back then
as the Bentley Grammar School. Headteacher Jason Tudor
tells
TheParliamentary Review
about the decision to reinvent
themselves and how they have used research into cognitive
psychology to shape their curriculum.
Despite our long and rich heritage, the decision was taken at the start of this year
to reinvent ourselves, with a brand-new identity and a new vision for education
in Calne. The senior leadership team and governors felt that we had a unique
opportunity to introduce this change, as we had already taken the decision to join
the incredibly successful Royal Wootton Bassett Academy Trust.
Our school vision
I joined the school as principal in September 2015 following a period of change
that had seen standards decline in terms of student outcomes. Parents in the
area were voting with their feet by sending their children to other schools in
neighbouring towns. This placed great strain on the school as pupil numbers
declined and financial constraints became difficult to manage.
Despite these challenges, however, what struck me in my first year as principal was
just how motivated the staff were to embrace change. This gave me the confidence
to introduce a bold new research and evidence-inspired strategy across the school.
REPORT CARD
KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY
»Headteacher: Jason Tudor
»Established in 2019
»Based in Calne, Wiltshire
»Type of school: Secondary and
sixth form
»No. of pupils: 790
Kingsbury Green
Academy
23KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY |
SECONDARY EDUCATION
This required significant changes
to the curriculum design as well as
teaching and learning. Each element
was informed by credible and robust
research with a focus on introducing
only the most impactful ofstrategies.
As a staff body, we talked a lot about
“collective efficacy”. This refers to a
situation where a team of individuals
share the belief that their unified
efforts can overcome any barriers to
producing outstanding results.The
concept has been around since the
1970s and has been the subject of
research in a number of fields, with
a common finding that organisations
that possess collective efficacy
are more successful. The specific
educational research supporting this
view is the meta-analysis used by John
Hattie in his latest edition of
Visible
Learning
. This identifies collective
efficacy as the most impactful factor
in improving student achievement. A
school with genuine collective efficacy
is likely to see students achieve three
GCSE grades per student better than a
school without collective efficacy.
The impact of research-led
learning
This culture of research-led strategic
improvement led to record-breaking
exam results in 2018, making us one of
the most improved schools in the country
and one of the top performing schools
in Wiltshire. Headline figures for the
proportion of our students achieving the
more challenging grade 5 benchmark
in English and maths improved to 47
per cent, which is far above the national
average of 40 per cent. In terms of
progress improvements, the school’s
Progress 8 score improved by 0.44 grades
with impressive gains in maths, English,
science and the humanities.
Given these improvements, it is
tempting to question our decision
to change the school identity and
completely reinvigorate every aspect
of our approach to education. The
simple answer is that we believe we
have a unique opportunity to do
more for the young people in our care
through joining the Royal Wootton
Bassett Academy Trust. The increased
collaboration with colleagues across the
trust has already had an impact on the
school. There are exciting developments
in curriculum design, teaching and
learning, assessment and feedback,
positive behaviour management and
CPD, to name but afew.
A strategy going forward
Our forward strategy will build on the
opportunities associated with belonging
to the Royal Wootton Bassett Academy
Trust. Our vision statement will be
“Achieving Excellence Together”,
emphasising our collaborative
approach to education. The strategy
is founded on three core elements:
the development of a challenging
curriculum that meets the needs of
all our students, a relentless focus on
developing teaching and learning,
and a culture underpinned by the
Kingsbury Green Academy “Pathway”.
George Croxford,
CEO of RWBAT with
headteacher Jason Tudor
A school with
genuine
collective
efficacy is likely
to see students
achieve three
GCSE grades
per student
better than a
school without
collective
efficacy
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY
Headteacher Jason Tudor
The enviably beautiful location
of Kingsbury Green Academy
Kingsbury Green Academy is a brand-new school and sixth
form established in September 2019, serving the Wiltshire
town of Calne and the surrounding villages. Previously
named the John Bentley School, the school can trace its roots
back to 1663, as the first school in Calne, known back then
as the Bentley Grammar School. Headteacher Jason Tudor
tells
TheParliamentary Review
about the decision to reinvent
themselves and how they have used research into cognitive
psychology to shape their curriculum.
Despite our long and rich heritage, the decision was taken at the start of this year
to reinvent ourselves, with a brand-new identity and a new vision for education
in Calne. The senior leadership team and governors felt that we had a unique
opportunity to introduce this change, as we had already taken the decision to join
the incredibly successful Royal Wootton Bassett Academy Trust.
Our school vision
I joined the school as principal in September 2015 following a period of change
that had seen standards decline in terms of student outcomes. Parents in the
area were voting with their feet by sending their children to other schools in
neighbouring towns. This placed great strain on the school as pupil numbers
declined and financial constraints became difficult to manage.
Despite these challenges, however, what struck me in my first year as principal was
just how motivated the staff were to embrace change. This gave me the confidence
to introduce a bold new research and evidence-inspired strategy across the school.
REPORT CARD
KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY
»Headteacher: Jason Tudor
»Established in 2019
»Based in Calne, Wiltshire
»Type of school: Secondary and
sixth form
»No. of pupils: 790
Kingsbury Green
Academy
23KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY |
SECONDARY EDUCATION
This required significant changes
to the curriculum design as well as
teaching and learning. Each element
was informed by credible and robust
research with a focus on introducing
only the most impactful ofstrategies.
As a staff body, we talked a lot about
“collective efficacy”. This refers to a
situation where a team of individuals
share the belief that their unified
efforts can overcome any barriers to
producing outstanding results.The
concept has been around since the
1970s and has been the subject of
research in a number of fields, with
a common finding that organisations
that possess collective efficacy
are more successful. The specific
educational research supporting this
view is the meta-analysis used by John
Hattie in his latest edition of
Visible
Learning
. This identifies collective
efficacy as the most impactful factor
in improving student achievement. A
school with genuine collective efficacy
is likely to see students achieve three
GCSE grades per student better than a
school without collective efficacy.
The impact of research-led
learning
This culture of research-led strategic
improvement led to record-breaking
exam results in 2018, making us one of
the most improved schools in the country
and one of the top performing schools
in Wiltshire. Headline figures for the
proportion of our students achieving the
more challenging grade 5 benchmark
in English and maths improved to 47
per cent, which is far above the national
average of 40 per cent. In terms of
progress improvements, the school’s
Progress 8 score improved by 0.44 grades
with impressive gains in maths, English,
science and the humanities.
Given these improvements, it is
tempting to question our decision
to change the school identity and
completely reinvigorate every aspect
of our approach to education. The
simple answer is that we believe we
have a unique opportunity to do
more for the young people in our care
through joining the Royal Wootton
Bassett Academy Trust. The increased
collaboration with colleagues across the
trust has already had an impact on the
school. There are exciting developments
in curriculum design, teaching and
learning, assessment and feedback,
positive behaviour management and
CPD, to name but afew.
A strategy going forward
Our forward strategy will build on the
opportunities associated with belonging
to the Royal Wootton Bassett Academy
Trust. Our vision statement will be
“Achieving Excellence Together”,
emphasising our collaborative
approach to education. The strategy
is founded on three core elements:
the development of a challenging
curriculum that meets the needs of
all our students, a relentless focus on
developing teaching and learning,
and a culture underpinned by the
Kingsbury Green Academy “Pathway”.
George Croxford,
CEO of RWBAT with
headteacher Jason Tudor
A school with
genuine
collective
efficacy is likely
to see students
achieve three
GCSE grades
per student
better than a
school without
collective
efficacy
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
24 | KINGSBURY GREEN ACADEMY
Our first priority with regard to
curriculum development will be
ensuring we have a curriculum that
best represents our school community.
Research has played a major part in this,
as we have been heavily influenced by
work on the concepts of spacing and
interleaving. Both concepts are found
in the field of cognitive psychology and
focus on the inextricable link between
learning and memory. The result will be
a cohesive “spiral curriculum”, which
requires each subject area to identify
the core learning concepts running
throughout that field of study. A good
example is the study of cells in science.
Whether you are a year 7 student or a
postgraduate biologist, you will study
cells. Through planning a curriculum
that returns to these core concepts
every year with increased nuance and
challenge, we will deepen the learning
experience as students build on prior
learning and link that prior learning
into their new experiences.
The work on developing teaching and
learning will always be ongoing. A core
belief of ours is that every member
of staff can improve every day. The
main driver for this improvement
will be through the development
of our teaching and learning cycle.
This cycleis again informed by
research from cognitive psychology
and specifically the importance of
connecting prior learning with new
learning. Understanding this link can
be transformative in helping teachers
to plan learning sequences that
develop deep learning by ensuring
that new concepts are explicitly linked
to the students’ current frames of
reference and knowledge.
Finally, we have a desire to develop
learners as happy, rounded and
successful citizens, as part of the
Pathway. This will focus on developing
the qualities of “confidence, courage,
courtesy, consideration and being
conscientious”. The Pathway is
informed by a range of research,
including Dweck’s work on mindset
and the previously mentioned work
on collective efficacy. Most important,
however, is our belief that developing
these qualities will help our students
to lead happy, successful lives; it is this
final element of the school strategy
that I am perhaps proudest of. In an
era when schools are under immense
pressure, we will be able to say that
our decisions are motivated by the best
interests of our students.
We work to develop
learners as happy,
rounded and successful
citizens
A culture of
research-led
strategic
improvement
led to record-
breaking exam
results in
2018, making
us one of the
most improved
schools in the
country
25THE HERTFORDSHIRE & ESSEX HIGH SCHOOL AND SCIENCE COLLEGE |
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Executive Headteacher
CathyTooze
The main school
frontage
The Hertfordshire & Essex School and Science College is a
girls’ secondary school with a mixed sixth form, based in
Bishop’s Stortford. In September 2017, it became part of a
multi-academy trust as it was requested to assist a local primary
school that had been placed in special measures by Ofsted.
Executive Headteacher Cathy Tooze explains their commitment
to developing their staff and how they have expanded to
circumvent funding challenges.
Our model is based on a combination of strategies. There is continuous review and
development, allowing us to build on the best and jettison what doesn’t work. The
bedrock of our atmosphere, ethos, traditions, daily patterns and expectations is
built on our motto of “Sic Itur Ad Astra”, which means “reach for the stars”. This
is supported by our mission statement, “Excellence for All” and our core values of
compassion, creativity, independence, initiative, resilience and respect.
Our positive approach to the changes made in education policy and practice is
also key. We look at what we are required to do and see how we can turn that
to our advantage. We have done this when managing the end of SATS, changes
to grading systems and new GCSE and A level specifications and we root our
decisions in evidence-based research. Much of this is done through continuing
professional development and setting up lesson studies or lead practitioner groups
in current areas of research. This allows us to test new ideas and ensure that
changes to school programmes and routines are founded on sound principles.
Meanwhile, we have maintained the traditional cognitive ability tests, which we
have been undertaking for decades, as this provides us with a baseline which
FACTS ABOUT
THE HERTFORDSHIRE & ESSEX
HIGH SCHOOL AND SCIENCE
COLLEGE
»Executive Headteacher:
CathyTooze
»High school opened in 1909,
MAT established in 2017
»Based in Bishop’s Stortford,
Hertfordshire
»Type of school: Multi- academy
trust
»No. of students: 1,700
»www.hemat.org.uk
The Hertfordshire & Essex
HighSchool and Science College

www.kingsburygreenacademy.com

This article was sponsored by Kingsbury Green Academy. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development