Liam Russell Architects

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Liam Russell Architects's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Liam Russell Architects is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.liamrussellarchitects.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
16 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
use of Chinese company Huawei in
Britain’s 5G network.
Mrs May said she had “compelling
evidence” that MrWilliamson was the
source for a national news story about
her stepping in to overrule colleagues
and allow the company to do some of
the infrastructure work.
Later that month the Metropolitan Police
confirmed they would not be taking
the matter forward as a breach of the
Official Secrets Act and MrWilliamson
denied that he was the source of the
story in
The Daily Telegraph.
He was replaced by Penny Mordaunt
MP, who became the first female
defence secretary.
The row centred on security concerns
over the potential use of the 5G system
for espionage, something some security
experts say the company has been
complicit in before.
Mrs May’s decision after a National
Security Council meeting in April was
that it was safe to use Huawei for
“non-core” parts of the network.
In May, in the foreword to a report by
the Henry Jackson Society, former MI6
Head Sir Richard Dearlove said: “No
part of the Communist Chinese state
is ultimately able to operate free of
the control exercised by its Communist
party leadership. Therefore, we must
conclude the engagement of Huawei
presents a potential security risk to
theUK.”
The news came amid a flurry of conflict
between governments and thecompany.
In December Canada arrested a senior
executive of China on a US warrant, in
connection with the possible breach of
US sanctions in Iran.
Meng Wanzhou is one of the vice
chairs of the technology firm and the
daughter of the company’s founder.
Chinese authorities arrested two
Canadians accused of links to espionage
shortly afterwards and tensions
between the two countriescontinued.
In July Sky News
reported the findings
of a committee of MPs on the
company, which said while “There are
no technological grounds to completely
ban Huawei equipment from the UK’s
5G infrastructure… there could be
legitimate geopolitical and ethical
reasons to do so.”
A spokesman for the company said in
over 30 years no one had ever produced
evidence of a link toespionage.
In July, MrWilliamson returned to
the cabinet as Boris Johnson’s new
education secretary.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to print, the company has
not been banned from Britain’s
telecommunications networks. The
importance of such networks – and
the security thereof – is just one of the
many points that has been raised by
representatives past and present alike.
Gavin Williamson was
sacked as defence
secretary over
allegations of a leak
regarding Huawei’s 5G
UK network deal
17LIAM RUSSELL ARCHITECTS |
CIVIL SOCIETY
use of Chinese company Huawei in
Britain’s 5G network.
Mrs May said she had “compelling
evidence” that MrWilliamson was the
source for a national news story about
her stepping in to overrule colleagues
and allow the company to do some of
the infrastructure work.
Later that month the Metropolitan Police
confirmed they would not be taking
the matter forward as a breach of the
Official Secrets Act and MrWilliamson
denied that he was the source of the
story in
The Daily Telegraph.
He was replaced by Penny Mordaunt
MP, who became the first female
defence secretary.
The row centred on security concerns
over the potential use of the 5G system
for espionage, something some security
experts say the company has been
complicit in before.
Mrs May’s decision after a National
Security Council meeting in April was
that it was safe to use Huawei for
“non-core” parts of the network.
In May, in the foreword to a report by
the Henry Jackson Society, former MI6
Head Sir Richard Dearlove said: “No
part of the Communist Chinese state
is ultimately able to operate free of
the control exercised by its Communist
party leadership. Therefore, we must
conclude the engagement of Huawei
presents a potential security risk to
theUK.”
The news came amid a flurry of conflict
between governments and thecompany.
In December Canada arrested a senior
executive of China on a US warrant, in
connection with the possible breach of
US sanctions in Iran.
Meng Wanzhou is one of the vice
chairs of the technology firm and the
daughter of the company’s founder.
Chinese authorities arrested two
Canadians accused of links to espionage
shortly afterwards and tensions
between the two countriescontinued.
In July Sky News
reported the findings
of a committee of MPs on the
company, which said while “There are
no technological grounds to completely
ban Huawei equipment from the UK’s
5G infrastructure… there could be
legitimate geopolitical and ethical
reasons to do so.”
A spokesman for the company said in
over 30 years no one had ever produced
evidence of a link toespionage.
In July, MrWilliamson returned to
the cabinet as Boris Johnson’s new
education secretary.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to print, the company has
not been banned from Britain’s
telecommunications networks. The
importance of such networks – and
the security thereof – is just one of the
many points that has been raised by
representatives past and present alike.
Gavin Williamson was
sacked as defence
secretary over
allegations of a leak
regarding Huawei’s 5G
UK network deal
Founder Liam Russell
Chandler’s Mews,
East Sussex
Incorporated in 2003, Liam Russell Architects is a multi-
award-winning architectural practice with offices in Brighton,
London and Manchester that works across the UK. The
practice is currently engaged in major regeneration projects in
London and the regions, including specialised commissions for
a range of clients. Founder Liam Russell tells
TheParliamentary
Review
more about how the practice gravitates towards
regeneration in all its forms – from the smallest to the largest
projects, from the subtle and discreet to the most overt and
encompassing.
Since our inception, we have considered ourselves one of the few practices that
look at alternative outcomes in order to create genuine value – madness is said
to be doing things the same thing over and over again and expecting a different
outcome. We are interested in differences. In the early days of a company, limited
resources can often lead to ingenuity and our practice’s start was no different.
One of our first clients was a large plc with forgotten land in an English south-
coasttown.
Through recommendation, the plc engaged me to maximise the site’s potential.
This potential was not evident to most; the site was a problem for the local
population, known for antisocial behaviour rather than housing. The solution
– a first for the town as an eco-exemplar – gained notoriety for being unique,
so much so that the small project of five houses appeared in a book by an
Australianpublisher.
FACTS ABOUT
LIAM RUSSELL ARCHITECTS
»Founder: Liam Russell
»Incorporated in 2003, started
trading in 2007
»Based in London, Brighton and
Manchester
»Services: Architecture, with a
focus on regeneration
»No. of employees: 20
Liam Russell
Architects
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | LIAM RUSSELL ARCHITECTS
Our way of working
Successive projects, with a variety of
clients, from institutional to private
investors, from charities to schools,
have given the practice a breadth of
experience, allowing us to demonstrate
that, whatever the brief, creativity and
endeavour achieve the best results. I
have pursued architecture since my
youth. I worked on Canon Street’s LIFFE,
came within a signature of heading
to Sandhurst with the Royal Engineers
and worked on a variety of potentially
career-changing opportunities in other
fields. Yet each test of faith brought
me back to mypassion.
Since 2014, we have become a BIM
practice. Our largest commission,
Croydon’s £40-million project for
LaSalle and the HSBC Pension
fund in Dingwall Road, has proven
that the future of construction
can be integrated, sustainable and
cost-effective. The building has
just been shortlisted for a British
Construction Industry Award for Digital
Transformation Initiative of the year.
These awards are the most prestigious
awards in the built environment sector.
JJ Rhatigan engaged the practice via
novation and the project is nearing
completion, on time and on budget. It
is also a building that will achieve 35
per cent improvements against typical
building regulations and a BREEAM
“very good” rating, due to a partly
retained existing concrete frame, and
through its own on-site heating and
power production. We believe that
a more streamlined process and a
design and construction team, working
together with the client, will ultimately
provide the best results.
A benefit of BIM has been its impact
on the team – BIM’s non-adversarial
method of working, by engendering
a better team spirit, has led to a more
positive approach to “clashes”, and
has created better relationships within
the wider team, which has positively
impacted on the practice’s staff. Also, as
a practice with offices in three regions
spanning north to south, our people are
our pulse and we are a proud exponent
of diversity, our staff being selected by
virtue of their skill and attitude.
The state of the sector
The sector is currently experiencing the
impact of uncertain politics, and this
is unlikely to change soon. Counter-
intuitively, the industry responds well
Carolyn House, Croydon
We consider
ourselves one
of the few
practices that
look at
alternative
outcomes to
create genuine
value
19LIAM RUSSELL ARCHITECTS |
CIVIL SOCIETY
to red tape, certainly when it is forced
to innovate towards a better, more
sustainable future. The attitude of the
sector towards change is often maligned
as poor but this is unfair, in our opinion.
We belong to one of the UK’s largest
sectors, and, as with any comparable
sector in terms of size, change is
perceived to be ponderous. Perhaps so,
but it is desired by the sector for many
reasons, and we have been part of a
new vanguard for change as above.
One such innovation the practice
is investing in is smart technology.
We have just achieved planning for
the first council houses in the Adur
Borough in West Sussex for over 30
years. Smart technology was integral
to the design of these houses. By using
the latest sensors and algorithms, an
environment can be analysed in order to
optimise the infrastructure. This is done
by seamlessly linking technology to the
facility management team, increasing
the efficiency of the building for both
residents and owners. Critical parameters
include proper ventilation, correct room
temperature and suitable lighting. If any
of these criteria are not up to outlined
standards, alerts can be set to get these
rectified either remotely or, if necessary
with human intervention.
However, what brings the practice the
most joy is the safeguarding that the
technology provides for the building’s
occupants. Secure in the knowledge that
their home will be programmed at the
optimum levels for their circumstances
and constantly monitored, any changes
to habits and routines are picked up.
This might indicate that someone has
fallen, or been taken ill. For the elderly
or those living alone, this can be a
lifeline, providing comfort that they have
someone checking in on them with real-
time information at their fingertips, who
can implement any human intervention
that is required.
We believe this will revolutionise the way
both building owners and users think
about their resource and energy usage.
If the practice were to declare an
interest in Brexit, as I said recently to
my Scottish pal with my quarter Italian
wife, while standing in the French
town of Chartres on holiday – it would
be to remain. That said, one potential
negative side effect of a borderless
trading structure with the continent is
the blandness that non-geographical,
context-lacking architecture can have
on our towns and cities as a result
of the homogenisation of building
materials and techniques. This is not
the same as French Gothic making
its exquisite way to England in the
12th century where it was positively
impacted upon by a different set of
cultural principles; we are talking
about wholescale aping of architecture
from other places and without any real
mindfulness towards an original idea.
Can anyone genuinely say that
researching a place, through the
internet, as opposed to feeling its energy
or knowing its character, is better?
For example, can anyone say that
bricks made in Belgium can be more
sustainable than bricks made in Sussex?
Our practice is international and profit
is on the agenda. But, we must respond
to a genuine human instinct that seeks
comfort in cultural identity, among
other things, as society values integrity.
For a better future, we look forward
to playing our part in enhancing
architecture to be more of its place.
Our practice is
international
and profit is
on the agenda
Albion Street, West
Sussex
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | LIAM RUSSELL ARCHITECTS
Our way of working
Successive projects, with a variety of
clients, from institutional to private
investors, from charities to schools,
have given the practice a breadth of
experience, allowing us to demonstrate
that, whatever the brief, creativity and
endeavour achieve the best results. I
have pursued architecture since my
youth. I worked on Canon Street’s LIFFE,
came within a signature of heading
to Sandhurst with the Royal Engineers
and worked on a variety of potentially
career-changing opportunities in other
fields. Yet each test of faith brought
me back to mypassion.
Since 2014, we have become a BIM
practice. Our largest commission,
Croydon’s £40-million project for
LaSalle and the HSBC Pension
fund in Dingwall Road, has proven
that the future of construction
can be integrated, sustainable and
cost-effective. The building has
just been shortlisted for a British
Construction Industry Award for Digital
Transformation Initiative of the year.
These awards are the most prestigious
awards in the built environment sector.
JJ Rhatigan engaged the practice via
novation and the project is nearing
completion, on time and on budget. It
is also a building that will achieve 35
per cent improvements against typical
building regulations and a BREEAM
“very good” rating, due to a partly
retained existing concrete frame, and
through its own on-site heating and
power production. We believe that
a more streamlined process and a
design and construction team, working
together with the client, will ultimately
provide the best results.
A benefit of BIM has been its impact
on the team – BIM’s non-adversarial
method of working, by engendering
a better team spirit, has led to a more
positive approach to “clashes”, and
has created better relationships within
the wider team, which has positively
impacted on the practice’s staff. Also, as
a practice with offices in three regions
spanning north to south, our people are
our pulse and we are a proud exponent
of diversity, our staff being selected by
virtue of their skill and attitude.
The state of the sector
The sector is currently experiencing the
impact of uncertain politics, and this
is unlikely to change soon. Counter-
intuitively, the industry responds well
Carolyn House, Croydon
We consider
ourselves one
of the few
practices that
look at
alternative
outcomes to
create genuine
value
19LIAM RUSSELL ARCHITECTS |
CIVIL SOCIETY
to red tape, certainly when it is forced
to innovate towards a better, more
sustainable future. The attitude of the
sector towards change is often maligned
as poor but this is unfair, in our opinion.
We belong to one of the UK’s largest
sectors, and, as with any comparable
sector in terms of size, change is
perceived to be ponderous. Perhaps so,
but it is desired by the sector for many
reasons, and we have been part of a
new vanguard for change as above.
One such innovation the practice
is investing in is smart technology.
We have just achieved planning for
the first council houses in the Adur
Borough in West Sussex for over 30
years. Smart technology was integral
to the design of these houses. By using
the latest sensors and algorithms, an
environment can be analysed in order to
optimise the infrastructure. This is done
by seamlessly linking technology to the
facility management team, increasing
the efficiency of the building for both
residents and owners. Critical parameters
include proper ventilation, correct room
temperature and suitable lighting. If any
of these criteria are not up to outlined
standards, alerts can be set to get these
rectified either remotely or, if necessary
with human intervention.
However, what brings the practice the
most joy is the safeguarding that the
technology provides for the building’s
occupants. Secure in the knowledge that
their home will be programmed at the
optimum levels for their circumstances
and constantly monitored, any changes
to habits and routines are picked up.
This might indicate that someone has
fallen, or been taken ill. For the elderly
or those living alone, this can be a
lifeline, providing comfort that they have
someone checking in on them with real-
time information at their fingertips, who
can implement any human intervention
that is required.
We believe this will revolutionise the way
both building owners and users think
about their resource and energy usage.
If the practice were to declare an
interest in Brexit, as I said recently to
my Scottish pal with my quarter Italian
wife, while standing in the French
town of Chartres on holiday – it would
be to remain. That said, one potential
negative side effect of a borderless
trading structure with the continent is
the blandness that non-geographical,
context-lacking architecture can have
on our towns and cities as a result
of the homogenisation of building
materials and techniques. This is not
the same as French Gothic making
its exquisite way to England in the
12th century where it was positively
impacted upon by a different set of
cultural principles; we are talking
about wholescale aping of architecture
from other places and without any real
mindfulness towards an original idea.
Can anyone genuinely say that
researching a place, through the
internet, as opposed to feeling its energy
or knowing its character, is better?
For example, can anyone say that
bricks made in Belgium can be more
sustainable than bricks made in Sussex?
Our practice is international and profit
is on the agenda. But, we must respond
to a genuine human instinct that seeks
comfort in cultural identity, among
other things, as society values integrity.
For a better future, we look forward
to playing our part in enhancing
architecture to be more of its place.
Our practice is
international
and profit is
on the agenda
Albion Street, West
Sussex

www.liamrussellarchitects.co.uk

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster