London Hotel Group

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by London Hotel Group's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from London Hotel Group is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.lhg.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | LONDON HOTEL GROUP
Founder and Owner
GauharNawab
Ibis Styles London
Walthamstow hotel
Gauhar Nawab arrived in England from Lucknow in 1961
aged 21, with little more than a strong ambition to make
something of himself and serve society. From modest
beginnings, he went about satisfying market demand wherever
it appeared, beginning by providing guest house services. He
now manages a portfolio of hotels across London. Gauhar tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about the journey he took along
the way.
Inspired by Persian poetry and a penchant for philosophy, I believe that by
exhibiting the qualities of hard work and perseverance, then God the most merciful
will smile on my endeavours. I started in a modest way but was always committed
to providing services that the public needed in a manner acceptable to them: for
me, to serve was to succeed.
I came to study as a barrister, but my grant was stopped due to the Indo-China
war, so I worked first as a factory worker, and then in a bakery for two years, seven
days a week. When I left the bakery, I joined Selfridges as a sales assistant. I also
studied part-time for the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers’ exams and, having
gained the qualification, joined Distillers as a shipping clerk. I still yearned to have
my own business, so I sold my home, premium bonds and car and bought a small
guest house in Balham, London, for £8,500 – doing everything from the cleaning
to making the beds, preparing breakfast and everything in between, day and night.
This purchase was made in 1969 with the assistance of a banker, whom I had
impressed by my commitment and determination, and I purchased the four
adjoining properties by 1974. Wanting to acquire an additional adjacent property,
FACTS ABOUT
LONDON HOTEL GROUP
»Founder and Owner:
GauharNawab
»Founded in 1969
»Based in London
»Services: London hotel
management
»No. of employees: More than
500
»The business started by selling
a home, a car and premium
bonds
London Hotel Group
43LONDON HOTEL GROUP |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
I found that I could not secure finance
unless I convinced the bank that I
was conversant with the building
trade. Consequently, I found a retired
builder who taught me everything.
I purchased 132 Ritherdon Road for
£11,000, converted it into three flats
and sold it for £45,000. My banker
then introduced me personally to
other banks, and with judicious use of
credit cards, I bought two more small
hotels of 16 rooms each on Clapham
Common – Dudley Hotel and Belvedere
Hotel – for £45,000 each. Thereafter,
I bought another adjoining property
and turned the three into a single
65-bedroom hotel. I managed a good
turnover through almost 100-per-cent
occupancy rates and kept going.
Principles of good practice
The principle of expansion for me
has been not to overextend and to
use, wherever possible, free reserves
for financing of new acquisitions,
thereby reducing exposure to loan
finance. The choice of lender has been
critical; I have always looked to find
the best-available rates in the market.
Ensuring consistently high occupancy
rates has been achieved by entering
into partnership with Accor and Best
Western and by building my own sales
team. Word of mouth from satisfied
guests is important in ensuring both
repeat and new business, while our
receptionists are trained to give a
warm welcome to all visitors.
My company, London Hotel Group,
sees itself not just as a successful
private hotel business, with consistent
occupancy rates of over 85 per cent,
but also as part of the communities in
which the hotels are situated. To that
end, we have appointed a community
engagement officer to operate both
across London as a whole and within
individual boroughs. The officer works
with the local authority and community
groups, assessing how we can support
them both in practical terms, by
enabling use of hotel premises, and
financially, as an active part of our
corporate social responsibility.
Secrets of success
I am an irrepressible advocate for
London and the UK, and my ambition
is to ensure that London can always
provide affordable but good-quality
hotel accommodation, so that it is a
city that those of modest means from
all over the world can visit. To that
end, I should like to double our present
number of hotels. Currently, we have
1,500 hotel rooms and two more
hotels under development, as well
as 200 residential properties in sites
throughout London.
A number of factors have allowed
me to develop a hotel and housing
portfolio that employs more than 500
people, while retaining a focus on
charitable causes and assisting the
needy. Firstly, I always meet the guests’
needs – good, clean, competitively
priced accommodation with
comfortable rooms and good facilities,
internet connectivity, and transport
links. I put myself in the position of
the guest, and that includes getting
a courteous service from all the staff,
which is instilled into them. That leads
to near 100-per-cent occupancy and
Best Western Plus
Croydon bedroom
I came to
study as a
barrister, but
my grant was
stopped due
to the Indo-
China war
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | LONDON HOTEL GROUP
Founder and Owner
GauharNawab
Ibis Styles London
Walthamstow hotel
Gauhar Nawab arrived in England from Lucknow in 1961
aged 21, with little more than a strong ambition to make
something of himself and serve society. From modest
beginnings, he went about satisfying market demand wherever
it appeared, beginning by providing guest house services. He
now manages a portfolio of hotels across London. Gauhar tells
The Parliamentary Review
more about the journey he took along
the way.
Inspired by Persian poetry and a penchant for philosophy, I believe that by
exhibiting the qualities of hard work and perseverance, then God the most merciful
will smile on my endeavours. I started in a modest way but was always committed
to providing services that the public needed in a manner acceptable to them: for
me, to serve was to succeed.
I came to study as a barrister, but my grant was stopped due to the Indo-China
war, so I worked first as a factory worker, and then in a bakery for two years, seven
days a week. When I left the bakery, I joined Selfridges as a sales assistant. I also
studied part-time for the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers’ exams and, having
gained the qualification, joined Distillers as a shipping clerk. I still yearned to have
my own business, so I sold my home, premium bonds and car and bought a small
guest house in Balham, London, for £8,500 – doing everything from the cleaning
to making the beds, preparing breakfast and everything in between, day and night.
This purchase was made in 1969 with the assistance of a banker, whom I had
impressed by my commitment and determination, and I purchased the four
adjoining properties by 1974. Wanting to acquire an additional adjacent property,
FACTS ABOUT
LONDON HOTEL GROUP
»Founder and Owner:
GauharNawab
»Founded in 1969
»Based in London
»Services: London hotel
management
»No. of employees: More than
500
»The business started by selling
a home, a car and premium
bonds
London Hotel Group
43LONDON HOTEL GROUP |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
I found that I could not secure finance
unless I convinced the bank that I
was conversant with the building
trade. Consequently, I found a retired
builder who taught me everything.
I purchased 132 Ritherdon Road for
£11,000, converted it into three flats
and sold it for £45,000. My banker
then introduced me personally to
other banks, and with judicious use of
credit cards, I bought two more small
hotels of 16 rooms each on Clapham
Common – Dudley Hotel and Belvedere
Hotel – for £45,000 each. Thereafter,
I bought another adjoining property
and turned the three into a single
65-bedroom hotel. I managed a good
turnover through almost 100-per-cent
occupancy rates and kept going.
Principles of good practice
The principle of expansion for me
has been not to overextend and to
use, wherever possible, free reserves
for financing of new acquisitions,
thereby reducing exposure to loan
finance. The choice of lender has been
critical; I have always looked to find
the best-available rates in the market.
Ensuring consistently high occupancy
rates has been achieved by entering
into partnership with Accor and Best
Western and by building my own sales
team. Word of mouth from satisfied
guests is important in ensuring both
repeat and new business, while our
receptionists are trained to give a
warm welcome to all visitors.
My company, London Hotel Group,
sees itself not just as a successful
private hotel business, with consistent
occupancy rates of over 85 per cent,
but also as part of the communities in
which the hotels are situated. To that
end, we have appointed a community
engagement officer to operate both
across London as a whole and within
individual boroughs. The officer works
with the local authority and community
groups, assessing how we can support
them both in practical terms, by
enabling use of hotel premises, and
financially, as an active part of our
corporate social responsibility.
Secrets of success
I am an irrepressible advocate for
London and the UK, and my ambition
is to ensure that London can always
provide affordable but good-quality
hotel accommodation, so that it is a
city that those of modest means from
all over the world can visit. To that
end, I should like to double our present
number of hotels. Currently, we have
1,500 hotel rooms and two more
hotels under development, as well
as 200 residential properties in sites
throughout London.
A number of factors have allowed
me to develop a hotel and housing
portfolio that employs more than 500
people, while retaining a focus on
charitable causes and assisting the
needy. Firstly, I always meet the guests’
needs – good, clean, competitively
priced accommodation with
comfortable rooms and good facilities,
internet connectivity, and transport
links. I put myself in the position of
the guest, and that includes getting
a courteous service from all the staff,
which is instilled into them. That leads
to near 100-per-cent occupancy and
Best Western Plus
Croydon bedroom
I came to
study as a
barrister, but
my grant was
stopped due
to the Indo-
China war
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
44 | LONDON HOTEL GROUP
consequent turnover, as well as guest
loyalty and marketing through word
ofmouth.
Secondly, I am never overambitious.
I fund as much as possible from
cashflow, reducing reliance on loans.
Thirdly, I build friendships and mutual
trust with close experienced advisers
and funders, earning their respect, so
that my business is their business. I am
blessed with infinite energy and an
innovative spirit. When first starting
in 1969, I sent a brochure to every
overseas British embassy and high
commission so that potential visitors
could know that there was basic but
clean accommodation available for £5
per night at a time when there was a
desperate shortage – as tourism then
was orientated much more around
wealthy clientele – so that I was able to
capture a market.
Putting clients at the centre
My commitment to the customer is
demonstrated by a couple of stories.
One was where I saw an elderly couple
waiting to check in and personally
escorted them, carrying their bags,
to the room. In return I was given
a £5 tip, but I said I was the owner
and returned the tip. Another was
when a couple with three young
children couldn’t find accommodation
anywhere in London during the
Christmas period, so I moved beds into
the hotel dining room and let them
stay for free.
I am pleased that determination and
aptitude, elbow grease, and respect
and care for guests are hallmarks that
others have recognised in me. I am
always aware of my origins and act
as a dynamic individual who expects
the same from others in the business.
I was also lucky enough to have a
strong partnership with my wife of 55
years, which ended only recently with
her untimely death. We did everything
together, and she was an essential
support and inspiration in both my
business and my personal life. Finally,
I have consistently been elected as
president of the Non-Resident Indians
Association and host the annual
awards for achievement, which bring
Indians distinguished in the fields
of medicine, science, academia and
engineering from all over the world to
the House of Lords.
My ambition is
to ensure that
London can
always provide
affordable but
good-quality
hotel
accommodation
The Best Western
London Queens Crystal
Palace Hotel
45TRINIFOLD MANAGEMENT |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Managing Director
Robert Rosenberg (far left),
with The Who and Bill
Curbishley (far right)
UB40 feat. Ali Campbell
& Astro
Founded in 1974 by William Curbishley, Trinifold Management
has been based in Camden Town since 1996 following a
move from its initial base in Soho. Primarily a management
company for musicians, having worked with notable artists
including The Who, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, Judas Priest and
UB40 among others, it has also branched out into publishing
and production. Managing Director Robert Rosenberg tells
The Parliamentary Review
about the current state of the music
industry and the future of many of Trinifold’s clients.
Despite managing some of the most popular artists in the world, publishing
in the music sector and producing feature films and documentaries, Trinifold
Management has always operated as a dynamic, small business. This included a
staff team of around eight people and a roster of artists to whom we dedicate a
significant amount of time and effort. Whether famous or unknown, we guarantee
that each artist we partner with is given the quality service that they deserve. This
model has always worked for us and our clients, and in 2008 we became part of
the Universal Music Group of companies.
Managing the success and progression of our artists
The successful management of music artists involves organising every aspect of
their careers. This includes tasks such as booking and organising tours, negotiating
record, publishing and merchandising deals, overseeing all ongoing aspects of
these deals and responding to all their day-to-day issues. Each artist is different
in terms of what they expect or need from their manager, so our staff have to
FACTS ABOUT
TRINIFOLD MANAGEMENT
»Managing Director:
RobertRosenberg
»Founded in 1974
»Based in Camden
»Services: Artist management
and film and TV production
»No. of employees: 8
»www.trinifold.co.uk
Trinifold Management

www.lhg.co.uk

This article was sponsored by London Hotel Group. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster