Manx National Heritage

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Manx National Heritage's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Manx National Heritage is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.manxnationalheritage.im

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | CRICH TRAMWAY VILLAGE
on between one and three new
projects a year and are always on the
lookout for opportunities to conserve
or restore historic trams. The cost of
restoration can range from £100,000
to £500,000, depending on the age
and condition of the tram we are
working on. This money is generated
from charitable donations, pledges
and support from restoration societies,
while all the receipts from visitors are
reinvested in our services, events and
general museum maintenance.
Improving the visitor experience
Visitor engagement and support
has been growing over the last five
years and we put this down to the
redevelopment and marketing work
we have conducted to promote our
offerings. The museum reached its
lowest point in terms of visitors in
2012 and since my arrival we have
taken care to re-engage our audience
and improve the attractions available
to guests. Customer satisfaction has
become our central focus and while
we can’t guarantee that everyone
will love every aspect of the museum,
we are far better at dealing with
complaints and problems and taking
action to rectify issues. If you deal
with a complaint properly, then you
receive a better response. We have
improved our customer service and
have created new mechanisms to help
support people with disabilities and
accessissues.
Our tram crews are fun and engaging
and we have been careful to make
each day out more interesting and
interactive. As we often say, there
is too much to do at Crich Tramway
Village for just one day, so it is our
responsibility to make sure people
return in order to experience everything
we have on offer. Events have also been
a great way to increase footfall and we
have accepted that we can’t expect
repeat business if nothingchanges.
Each of our events has a different
focus, with classic car events arguably
appealing to older guests, and a
seaside week for families. Each year
we host a beer festival from our on-
site pub, which features brass bands,
horse-tram and steampunk days.
We have also hosted historical re-
enactments with volunteers acting in a
home front setting during the Second
World War. These events have been a
great success, supported by people in
great numbers.
For children of all ages we have hosted
a woodland week and a Lego event,
and we offer packages for school trips.
We can offer to run sessions ourselves,
or have teachers running sessions of
their own. I have also worked with
local universities as a lecturer and we
are hoping to extend opportunities
to apprentices looking to gain skills.
We have Rolls-Royce apprentices who
volunteer in order to understand the
way historic trams work, and this
type of collaboration is something we
really encourage going forward. As a
local charity, we want to continue to
deliver for our community and provide
great days out for our visitors. Trams
movepeople.
We have
taken care to
re-engage our
audience and
improve the
attractions
available to
guests
August 2018, “1940s
Homefront” event
31MANX NATIONAL HERITAGE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Director Edmund Southworth
The Great Laxey Wheel
Manx National Heritage is the trading name of the Manx
Museum and National Trust, which was first established
by Tynwald in 1886. Its aim was to create a body that
cared for the ancient monuments on the Isle of Man. The first
dedicated museum opened in 1923 in Douglas. Fast-forward
nearly 100 years and its current Director Edmund Southworth is
running a quite different organisation. He tells the
Review
about
how Manx National Heritage balances its role at the heart of
the Manx community with a warm welcome for visitors and a
presence on the world stage.
The Isle of Man is situated in the Irish Sea, almost equidistant from Ireland, Scotland
and England. Its easy access by sea has led to a rich archaeological and cultural
heritage reflecting over 10,000 years of human occupation and contact with its
neighbours. It was an independent kingdom under a Norse dynasty from about
1000 until 1268 and then held by English lords until formally taken into the care of
the English Crown in 1765.
As the Act of Union in 1707 never applied to the island, it is part of neither the UK
nor the EU. Constitutionally, it is a Crown dependency with its own parliament,
Tynwald – a legacy of the Vikings. It is a self-sufficient economy with sectors such
as financial services and e-gaming complementing traditional activities such as
tourism, agriculture and fisheries. It prides itself on being a modern, international
business centre meeting international regulatory and tax standards. It has recently
been recognised by UNESCO as a biosphere reserve.
Since its foundation, MNH has grown significantly and is now the integrated
national heritage agency, having a range of functions that would be separated
FACTS ABOUT
MANX NATIONAL HERITAGE
»Director: Edmund Southworth
»Founded in 1886
»Located in Douglas, Isle of Man
»Services: Provision of
museums, library and archives,
management of land, tourism
facilities and promotion,
learning and research
»No. of employees: 80 plus 100
casual and seasonal staff
»Owner of 3,000 acres of land
and 500 sheep
Manx National
Heritage
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | MANX NATIONAL HERITAGE
in the UK. We operate a library and
archive, several museums, major
historical sites such as Castle Rushen,
Peel Castle and the Laxey Wheel, as
well as a number of visitor facilities.
It became the National Trust for
the island in 1951 and is a major
landowner with responsibility for
aspects of the natural as well as
historic environment.
We advise the government on issues
such as planning and treasure and
provide a range of services such as
education for school children and
tourism facilities. The museums are
accredited by Arts Council England
as national, with access to the
Manx Museum itself being free. Our
organisation is unusual in that it is a
charity registered in the Isle of Man,
statutorily established by Tynwald and
with significant public funding of £4
million per year. In scale we are closest
to large UK local authority services, but
we receive no funding from the UK
Heritage Lottery Fund or the EU.
Creating a modern structure
The great challenge for charities is
to ensure their governance is fit for
purpose. We have grown rapidly
since the 1980s but had retained our
original model of 24 trustees who
represented local organisations with
no fixed terms of office. The board
was increasingly unsuited to providing
strategic direction and oversight to
the professional management. The
legislation was amended in 2011 to
provide for a smaller board, with all
members on fixed terms of office.
An independent panel now recruits
trustees, with the applications
benchmarked against formal role
specifications. Appointed in 2012, they
conducted a formal governance review
after their first five-year term of office
to learn from their experience and to
strengthen their focus on succession
management. The board has two
subcommittees that balance scrutiny
with forward planning. The executive
team attend board meetings and
have a buddy system with individual
trustees to allow for issues to be raised
informally. A detailed three-year rolling
Forward Plan is produced annually
and performance reported quarterly to
theboard.
In order to maximise the benefits
and respond to the implications
of the organisation’s charitable
status in the modern world, we are
currently working with the Isle of Man
20th-century posters
advertising sailings to
the island
It became the
National Trust
for the island
in 1951
33MANX NATIONAL HERITAGE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
government to document more closely
our arm’s-length relationship and the
contribution it makes to government
policies and objectives. The existing
partnership is strong and there is no
intention to change it. We have access
to many government administrative
systems, which provide security,
accountability and economies of scale.
Changes to the way the UK and the
Isle of Man shared VAT revenues in
2009 alongside the wider international
financial crisis led to a significant
reduction in public sector budgets on
the island. In response, we have adopted
a long-term financial strategy that
maximised efficiencies in the short term
while seeking to generate more income
from our assets and users. Fortunately,
we have been able to draw on reserves
to avoid reducing service levels.
Ten years on, the strategy continues to
deliver benefits, with over £1 million
per year in self-generated income now
being achieved. This includes admission
and retail income, leases of cafés and
other properties, events and corporate
hires. Two of our properties have been
refurbished as holiday accommodation
and we are investing in an historic Arts
and Crafts house in Douglas, which
will add to our portfolio. The strategy
also includes maximising the benefits
of charitable status by actively seeking
donations and bequests, and we have
recently appointed our first fundraising
officer to support the trustees with
implementation.
Accessing a new audience
Audiences are at the heart of our work
and we conducted major research in
2012 and 2017 to identify and better
understand our users and their needs.
This has driven improvements to displays
and family-friendly facilities, new
value-for-money season ticketing, free
admission for children and innovative
public programming. Tourism continues
to be important to the island and we
have worked with partners such as
Isle of Man Heritage Railways to attract
new groups to the island. This has
included exhibiting at the World Travel
Market in London to raise awareness
and organising familiarisation visits for
travel operators and journalists.
Legislation on the island has followed
UK practice in terms of inclusion and
equalities. We celebrate diversity in our
programming and have significantly
improved our facilities – even the
800-year-old Castle Rushen has
improved access for people with
mobility issues. A new Changing Places
standard toilet has also been installed
at the Manx Museum – one of the first
in any museum across the British Isles.
We also continue to innovate by using
digital technologies. The historic 18th-
century yacht
Peggy
has been laser
scanned to provide accurate assessment
of its condition and is currently
undergoing extensive conservation.
Similar high-resolution laser scanning
has recorded over 200 Manx-carved
stone crosses and fragments from the
Norse period. These are now being
made publicly available through the
iMuseum, our flagship digital gateway,
which also contains over one million
records relating to Manx history and
400,000 pages of newsprint from the
last 200years.
Audiences are
at the heart of
our work
Bradda Head
by Robert
Gell
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | MANX NATIONAL HERITAGE
in the UK. We operate a library and
archive, several museums, major
historical sites such as Castle Rushen,
Peel Castle and the Laxey Wheel, as
well as a number of visitor facilities.
It became the National Trust for
the island in 1951 and is a major
landowner with responsibility for
aspects of the natural as well as
historic environment.
We advise the government on issues
such as planning and treasure and
provide a range of services such as
education for school children and
tourism facilities. The museums are
accredited by Arts Council England
as national, with access to the
Manx Museum itself being free. Our
organisation is unusual in that it is a
charity registered in the Isle of Man,
statutorily established by Tynwald and
with significant public funding of £4
million per year. In scale we are closest
to large UK local authority services, but
we receive no funding from the UK
Heritage Lottery Fund or the EU.
Creating a modern structure
The great challenge for charities is
to ensure their governance is fit for
purpose. We have grown rapidly
since the 1980s but had retained our
original model of 24 trustees who
represented local organisations with
no fixed terms of office. The board
was increasingly unsuited to providing
strategic direction and oversight to
the professional management. The
legislation was amended in 2011 to
provide for a smaller board, with all
members on fixed terms of office.
An independent panel now recruits
trustees, with the applications
benchmarked against formal role
specifications. Appointed in 2012, they
conducted a formal governance review
after their first five-year term of office
to learn from their experience and to
strengthen their focus on succession
management. The board has two
subcommittees that balance scrutiny
with forward planning. The executive
team attend board meetings and
have a buddy system with individual
trustees to allow for issues to be raised
informally. A detailed three-year rolling
Forward Plan is produced annually
and performance reported quarterly to
theboard.
In order to maximise the benefits
and respond to the implications
of the organisation’s charitable
status in the modern world, we are
currently working with the Isle of Man
20th-century posters
advertising sailings to
the island
It became the
National Trust
for the island
in 1951
33MANX NATIONAL HERITAGE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
government to document more closely
our arm’s-length relationship and the
contribution it makes to government
policies and objectives. The existing
partnership is strong and there is no
intention to change it. We have access
to many government administrative
systems, which provide security,
accountability and economies of scale.
Changes to the way the UK and the
Isle of Man shared VAT revenues in
2009 alongside the wider international
financial crisis led to a significant
reduction in public sector budgets on
the island. In response, we have adopted
a long-term financial strategy that
maximised efficiencies in the short term
while seeking to generate more income
from our assets and users. Fortunately,
we have been able to draw on reserves
to avoid reducing service levels.
Ten years on, the strategy continues to
deliver benefits, with over £1 million
per year in self-generated income now
being achieved. This includes admission
and retail income, leases of cafés and
other properties, events and corporate
hires. Two of our properties have been
refurbished as holiday accommodation
and we are investing in an historic Arts
and Crafts house in Douglas, which
will add to our portfolio. The strategy
also includes maximising the benefits
of charitable status by actively seeking
donations and bequests, and we have
recently appointed our first fundraising
officer to support the trustees with
implementation.
Accessing a new audience
Audiences are at the heart of our work
and we conducted major research in
2012 and 2017 to identify and better
understand our users and their needs.
This has driven improvements to displays
and family-friendly facilities, new
value-for-money season ticketing, free
admission for children and innovative
public programming. Tourism continues
to be important to the island and we
have worked with partners such as
Isle of Man Heritage Railways to attract
new groups to the island. This has
included exhibiting at the World Travel
Market in London to raise awareness
and organising familiarisation visits for
travel operators and journalists.
Legislation on the island has followed
UK practice in terms of inclusion and
equalities. We celebrate diversity in our
programming and have significantly
improved our facilities – even the
800-year-old Castle Rushen has
improved access for people with
mobility issues. A new Changing Places
standard toilet has also been installed
at the Manx Museum – one of the first
in any museum across the British Isles.
We also continue to innovate by using
digital technologies. The historic 18th-
century yacht
Peggy
has been laser
scanned to provide accurate assessment
of its condition and is currently
undergoing extensive conservation.
Similar high-resolution laser scanning
has recorded over 200 Manx-carved
stone crosses and fragments from the
Norse period. These are now being
made publicly available through the
iMuseum, our flagship digital gateway,
which also contains over one million
records relating to Manx history and
400,000 pages of newsprint from the
last 200years.
Audiences are
at the heart of
our work
Bradda Head
by Robert
Gell

www.manxnationalheritage.im

This article was sponsored by Manx National Heritage. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster