Marine Society & Sea Cadets

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Marine Society & Sea Cadets's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Marine Society & Sea Cadets is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.marine-society.org

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | SOCS
Key to developing the SOCS platform
was partnering directly with the schools
we worked with. We asked them about
the difficulties they were facing and
built the system around this, ensuring
it responded to their needs.
We continue to do this and are in
contact with many school staff on
how we can improve the system.
Through training and by providing a
user group platform to schools, we
ensure that our clients make the most
of all the benefits of the system and
how the workflows and processes
can improve and drive efficiencies. By
creating an encompassing platform,
which is continually updated based on
input from users, we have reached an
enviable market position.
The need for greater integration
Our major contemporary challenge
is the lack of integration across our
sector. During the first wave of
educational technology products,
everyone tried to develop a system
that could do everything a school
required. Given the complexity and
the number of tasks even small
schools have to manage, this quickly
proved unachievable. In response,
developers switched tactics and
a range of smaller, best-of-breed
solutions were developed. In order to
more fully address a school’s needs,
integration capabilities need to be
embedded in these platforms. The past
five years have seen the beginning
of the development of integration
schemes. These are not yet perfect
and more needs to be done to ensure
schools can join up different platforms
for different needs. There are now
multiple products whose sole purpose
is to help with integration, a symptom
that more work needs to be done to
join up the dots for schools.
As we look to the future, we are
planning to further our international
growth. Independent British education
is being exported all over the world
and many independent schools are
establishing satellites abroad. This will
bring huge opportunities for us. By
targeting these emerging markets,
especially in Australia and the US, we
are confident we can increase SOCS’
international presence while retaining
the friendly, small company feel that
has driven our growth so far.
Our major
contemporary
challenge is
the lack of
integration
across our
sector
The SOCS team
17MARINE SOCIETY & SEA CADETS |
EDUCATION SERVICES
Policy Advisor AndrewWeston
Sea Cadets are based in
over 400 locations up and
down the country
The Marine Society and Sea Cadets has a proud heritage
and tradition of providing a mixture of services to young
people and seafarers. The organisation has worked with
young people in the Sea Cadets Corps for over 150 years using
adventure as an opportunity to develop skills and lifelong
interests. Policy Advisor Andrew Weston tells
The Parliamentary
Review
about the impact of Sea Cadets’ youth work, and key
lessons the wider world can draw from it.
Our sense of belonging, shared values and belief in building a supportive
environment is particularly valuable when working with harder-to-reach young
people, including those at risk of engaging in crime. This is an area where we know
our model makes a difference, with 55 per cent of cadets agreeing their time with
us has stopped them getting into trouble. One of our local commanding officers,
James in Southwark, says: “We don’t write off young people; we direct their
energy. In society today, everyone is quite happy to force them further and further
into a life of crime.”
We see this in action for one of James’ cadets, who joined at aged 13 soon after
being arrested for burglary. His time with the cadets turned his life around, and at
19 he now volunteers as a teacher at his old unit. Our model encourages young
people to embrace a common set of traditions and engage with youth support over
a long period of time.
FACTS ABOUT
MARINE SOCIETY & SEACADETS
»Policy Advisor: AndrewWeston
»The Marine Society was
founded in 1756 and the Sea
Cadets in 1856; they merged
in 2004
»Located nationwide, across
over 400 local units, working
with 15,000 cadets
»Services: Helps launch young
people for life today, and
helps seafarers learn new
skills and gain accredited
qualifications
»No. of employees: 200 staff
and 9,000 volunteers
Marine Society &
SeaCadets
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | MARINE SOCIETY & SEA CADETS
»TRAINING AND LEARNING
Turning to the impact we can make once a young person has been embedded into Sea Cadets, our learning offer
focuses on depth overbreadth.
This lets young people build and develop a wide range of specific skills and discover real passions:
»As well as studying maritime-focused topics such as sailing, cadets can receive specialist training in subjects
relevant to the wider world of work, such as catering, gaining internationally recognised accreditations in the
process. Our young people achieved a total of 63,595 qualifications last year.
»Young people are also given the chance to build core life skills such as leadership and resilience, which they
can then apply throughout their adult life. This is achieved by letting young people get really involved with
something over a long period of time.
We know there is debate among
policymakers about how youth work
should be developed, including the
recently launched review into statutory
guidance on providing youth services.
In order to engage the hardest to
reach, we recommend a priority is
placed on longer-term open-access
services to give young people the
chance to integrate into the traditions
of these services and sustain change.
The right skills
An essential element of MSSC is our
link to the maritime sector, and the
skills we develop in young people are a
key part of this.
Maritime 2050, the government’s key
strategy for how the sector can meet
the challenges of a changing world,
recognises the importance of growing
and transforming the maritime
workforce. It also stresses the need for
partnership between government and
industry. We believe another important
partnership is between government,
industry and the youth sector.
Despite the importance of the
maritime sector to the UK economy –
95 per cent of UK trade is by sea – it is
increasingly hard to find people with
the right skills. We know our work can
be a key part of correcting this.
Kirsty Dawson, Carnival UK’s manager
for fleet and technical cadets, noted:“At
Carnival we think it’s really important for
young people to get the skills they need
to take part in the growing and exciting
cruise sector, and support the wider
maritime industry. Our experience with
Phil, a former Sea Cadet and current
volunteer at Glasgow Sea Cadets Unit,
means we know Sea Cadets helps give
young people the skills they need to
succeed. Phil began as a deck cadet and
has now progressed to a third officer.
We’ve been particularly impressed by his
dedication, professionalism and good
basic knowledge of seamanship skills,
which we know developed from his
foundation as a Sea Cadet.”
Phil himself added: “Sea Cadets
gave me a great head start in life.
As my job is maritime, the nautical
training has been really helpful,
but the most valuable skills were
soft ones like self-confidence, self-
discipline, organisation, leadership and
teamwork. These skills have allowed
me to flourish in a job that I love.”
Around 15,000 Sea
Cadets develop the
confidence to set them
up to enjoy life and get
through its challenges
We don’t write
off young
people; we
direct their
energy. In
society today,
everyone is quite
happy to force
them further
and further into
a life of crime
James, Southwark Unit
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | MARINE SOCIETY & SEA CADETS
»TRAINING AND LEARNING
Turning to the impact we can make once a young person has been embedded into Sea Cadets, our learning offer
focuses on depth overbreadth.
This lets young people build and develop a wide range of specific skills and discover real passions:
»As well as studying maritime-focused topics such as sailing, cadets can receive specialist training in subjects
relevant to the wider world of work, such as catering, gaining internationally recognised accreditations in the
process. Our young people achieved a total of 63,595 qualifications last year.
»Young people are also given the chance to build core life skills such as leadership and resilience, which they
can then apply throughout their adult life. This is achieved by letting young people get really involved with
something over a long period of time.
We know there is debate among
policymakers about how youth work
should be developed, including the
recently launched review into statutory
guidance on providing youth services.
In order to engage the hardest to
reach, we recommend a priority is
placed on longer-term open-access
services to give young people the
chance to integrate into the traditions
of these services and sustain change.
The right skills
An essential element of MSSC is our
link to the maritime sector, and the
skills we develop in young people are a
key part of this.
Maritime 2050, the government’s key
strategy for how the sector can meet
the challenges of a changing world,
recognises the importance of growing
and transforming the maritime
workforce. It also stresses the need for
partnership between government and
industry. We believe another important
partnership is between government,
industry and the youth sector.
Despite the importance of the
maritime sector to the UK economy –
95 per cent of UK trade is by sea – it is
increasingly hard to find people with
the right skills. We know our work can
be a key part of correcting this.
Kirsty Dawson, Carnival UK’s manager
for fleet and technical cadets, noted:“At
Carnival we think it’s really important for
young people to get the skills they need
to take part in the growing and exciting
cruise sector, and support the wider
maritime industry. Our experience with
Phil, a former Sea Cadet and current
volunteer at Glasgow Sea Cadets Unit,
means we know Sea Cadets helps give
young people the skills they need to
succeed. Phil began as a deck cadet and
has now progressed to a third officer.
We’ve been particularly impressed by his
dedication, professionalism and good
basic knowledge of seamanship skills,
which we know developed from his
foundation as a Sea Cadet.”
Phil himself added: “Sea Cadets
gave me a great head start in life.
As my job is maritime, the nautical
training has been really helpful,
but the most valuable skills were
soft ones like self-confidence, self-
discipline, organisation, leadership and
teamwork. These skills have allowed
me to flourish in a job that I love.”
Around 15,000 Sea
Cadets develop the
confidence to set them
up to enjoy life and get
through its challenges
We don’t write
off young
people; we
direct their
energy. In
society today,
everyone is quite
happy to force
them further
and further into
a life of crime
James, Southwark Unit
19MARINE SOCIETY & SEA CADETS |
EDUCATION SERVICES
Challenges
One of the biggest challenges we and
the wider voluntary youth sector face
is access to resources like enough
volunteers. We have no shortage of
young people who want to take part,
and, in many areas, we would like to
open new groups to meet existing
waiting lists.
It is getting harder for people to
find the time to volunteer, with
busy working lives and other
commitments. We would love to see
key stakeholders, from government to
employers, look at ways to give people
more opportunities (or incentives) to
volunteer and make a difference to
young people’s lives.
Looking to the future
We know a key part of fulfilling the
goals of Maritime 2050 is creating a
real interest for the next generation in
the skills the maritime sector needs.
Our “Maritime Engineering Pathways”
project brings mobile workshops to
schools across the country to let young
people try out different elements
of engineering within a maritime
context and to increase their interest in
STEM subjects. This has been warmly
received, and we are looking at how
we can further leverage our youth
offer to build the skills young people
need for the future.
We are currently developing our 2026
strategy, looking at a range of topics.
These include how we focus on young
people. We know we are skilled in
engaging with communities that often
lack youth provision. We are interested
in understanding and building on this
going forward, potentially identifying
how we can best support harder-
to-reach young people across the
United Kingdom. We are always on
the lookout for people to work with
us and invite you to engage with
us nationally, or with your local Sea
Cadetunit.
Sea Cadets
gave me a
great head
start in life…
the most
valuable skills
were soft ones
like self-
confidence,
self-discipline,
organisation,
leadership and
teamwork
Phil, Glasgow Unit
Through a range of
activities on land as
well as on water, Sea
Cadets of all ages and
all backgrounds learn
to love the feeling of
achieving things that at
first seemed difficult

www.marine-society.org

This article was sponsored by Marine Society & Sea Cadets. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development