Newland Hurst Care Home

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Newland Hurst Care Home's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Newland Hurst Care Home is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.newlandhurst.org.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
20 | ACORNS HEALTH CARE
In terms of the area we cover, we
are focusing on Southampton and
Hampshire, staying in our local area.
We will be liaising closely with the
relevant authorities in this area,
ensuring we provide local beds for
local people.
Allied to our supported living service
is our healthcare provision, Acorns
Southern Ltd. This will provide
supported living staff, with each home
having its own small office. This office
will co-ordinate the running of each
home and their own staff, and will
promote an atmosphere of ownership
and responsibility. All of these service
users will have their own tenancy to
ensure they have the security of being
in their own home.
Independent living: reducing
the strain on the NHS
The major challenge that the sector,
and organisations like ours, face is
finance. In order to tackle the issues
we face directly, we need to devise
a way to continue to support the
most vulnerable in a sustainable
way. It is undeniable that budgets
have been reduced and cuts have
been made and so savings must
be found, but many organisations
have tried to find these savings in
the wages of their staff. In my view,
this is a poor decision and alongside
decreasing staff morale, in what
is already a highly pressurised and
underappreciated role, this can lead
to safeguarding issues. Simply put,
if you are unable to pay your staff
properly, you will not attract the
bestemployees.
The NHS’s Transforming Care
programme states that people with
learning disabilities should be able to
continue to live in the community;
however, funding has not been
made available to facilitate this. If
this approach were championed
more strongly, clear savings could
be made through the removal of
the need for individuals to go back
to hospital, which exerts strain on
the NHS and incurs significant costs.
If care plans and care packages are
designed correctly, working alongside
the families who have helped to raise
theseyoung people, every individual
can receive the correct amount of
support, and savings can be made
across theboard.
As we look ahead, our future direction
is clear: to provide an outstanding
service for adults with challenging
behaviours and learning difficulties,
enabling them to have a home from
home while promoting and supporting
their independence.
Our direction is
clear to provide
a service that is
outstanding.
Supporting
independence
and
community
living
Top: The relaxing lounge
area for all to socialize in
Bottom: Own bedroom
space for residents to
personalise as they wish
21NEWLAND HURST CARE HOME |
CARE
Operational Manager
BobTimmins
The farmhouse, rebuilt and
renovated by families of the
people we support
Newland Hurst is a small charity that supports people
with a learning disability in the Droitwich Spa area of
Worcestershire to lead full and valued lives. The charity
was formed by the parents of people with disabilities, which
Operational Manager Bob Timmins says is key to its success
and longevity. Its mantra, “learning and developing through
experience”, extends to everything the charity does – which
includes raising awareness, spearheading community support
initiatives and operating an assisted living facility.
Thirty-two of the 43 police forces throughout England and Wales that responded
to a Freedom of Information request from United Response recorded a total of
5,342 disability hate crimes in 2017/18, a dramatic rise on the 4,005 offences from
the previous year.
We are aiming to provide a small part of the local solution to these alarming
statistics. Following the closure of many services for people with learning
disabilities, there is a general feeling within the community that there is a void
where a support network once existed. One area where support networks can, and
often do, exist is in the workplace.
Less than 8 per cent of people with a learning disability are in paid work. This is due
in part to people’s attitudes and expectations of people with disabilities, but also to
a lack of specialised support for people to fulfil their potential. We have found that
many people with disabilities can easily become valued members of a team and do
FACTS ABOUT
NEWLAND HURST CARE HOME
»Operational Manager:
BobTimmins
»Established in 1978
»Based in Droitwich Spa,
Worcestershire
»Services: Disability support
charity and assisted living facility
»No. of employees: 23 from the
local area, including three with
learning disabilities
»Turnover: £650,000
»Supports 16 people with
disabilities
Newland Hurst Care
Home
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | NEWLAND HURST CARE HOME
not necessarily require more support
than most people in employment;
they require only the right support.
This in turn provides these people with
colleagues and people to communicate
with. This goes a long way to ensuring
that some of the most vulnerable
people in society do not become
isolated and potential victims of abuse,
while at the same time providing
the individual with a sense of value
andachievement.
Working with the next
generation
We see the value in including the
next generation in the work that we
do, and our charity works closely
with a local primary school on various
educational and practical projects. The
benefits of this work are too numerous
to cover.
However, they are principally that
the person with disabilities becomes
the care giver in a relationship rather
than the person receiving the support.
These are usually relationships that
many people with learning disabilities
may sadly never experience. But
if we examine our own lives and
relationships, we often find that the
young people in our lives are the
ones who provide us with the most
satisfaction and reward.
While difficult to measure, uncertainty
in young people when they first meet a
person with a learning disability is clear
to see, and this uncertainty can soon
lead to a general lack of understanding
and even fear. This in turn may lead
to bullying, harassment and even
hatecrimes.
Since beginning our project, we
have witnessed young people not
only approach our residents in the
street but converse, make jokes and
show a level of understanding that
younger generations rarely receive
credit for. We feel that by working
together, the fear of people with a
disability has dissipated, leaving room
for understanding and friendships to
grow and flourish. It is clear to us that
interaction is as crucial as education
when attempting to reduce the levels
of hate crime aimed at people with
disabilities within our communities.
The person
with
disabilities
becomes the
caregiver in a
relationship
rather than
the person
receiving
support
Growing produce for
sale at local markets
A group enjoying rehearsals for their
Christmas performance for families
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | NEWLAND HURST CARE HOME
not necessarily require more support
than most people in employment;
they require only the right support.
This in turn provides these people with
colleagues and people to communicate
with. This goes a long way to ensuring
that some of the most vulnerable
people in society do not become
isolated and potential victims of abuse,
while at the same time providing
the individual with a sense of value
andachievement.
Working with the next
generation
We see the value in including the
next generation in the work that we
do, and our charity works closely
with a local primary school on various
educational and practical projects. The
benefits of this work are too numerous
to cover.
However, they are principally that
the person with disabilities becomes
the care giver in a relationship rather
than the person receiving the support.
These are usually relationships that
many people with learning disabilities
may sadly never experience. But
if we examine our own lives and
relationships, we often find that the
young people in our lives are the
ones who provide us with the most
satisfaction and reward.
While difficult to measure, uncertainty
in young people when they first meet a
person with a learning disability is clear
to see, and this uncertainty can soon
lead to a general lack of understanding
and even fear. This in turn may lead
to bullying, harassment and even
hatecrimes.
Since beginning our project, we
have witnessed young people not
only approach our residents in the
street but converse, make jokes and
show a level of understanding that
younger generations rarely receive
credit for. We feel that by working
together, the fear of people with a
disability has dissipated, leaving room
for understanding and friendships to
grow and flourish. It is clear to us that
interaction is as crucial as education
when attempting to reduce the levels
of hate crime aimed at people with
disabilities within our communities.
The person
with
disabilities
becomes the
caregiver in a
relationship
rather than
the person
receiving
support
Growing produce for
sale at local markets
A group enjoying rehearsals for their
Christmas performance for families
23NEWLAND HURST CARE HOME |
CARE
Adapting to increasing cuts
Over the course of the past 13 years,
the amount of money available to
local authorities to support people
with disabilities has reduced year-
on-year via local authority cuts. This
has meant that salaries within social
care have stagnated, and attracting
good people into the profession has
become increasingly difficult.
Staff turnover is incredibly high
under normal circumstances,
which causes a lack of consistency
in support, in turn causing
safeguarding issues for some. It has
also meant that in some areas day
centres have closed, transport has
reduced and the general quality of
life of those with a disability has
decreased. This potentially leaves
the most vulnerable in our society
isolated andunstimulated.
Even though these dramatic changes
have occurred over recent years, the
budgets of local authorities continue
to be squeezed even further.
For example, this year, to March
2020, Worcestershire identified
a shortfall of £23 million in its
budget which had to be met by
savings and efficiency proposals,
with adult social care pressures a
key reason for this. This is clearly
notsustainable.
The pressure felt by the underfunding
of local authorities will only be
passed onto providers, who are then
forced to cut corners, provide the
lowest of wages and invest minimally
in the people they support.
While this is not the only reason,
we fear that it may contribute to
the number of times we switch on
a television set to see the abhorrent
behaviour that has occurred at
services such as Winterbourne View,
Whorlton Hall and Mendip House.
Day centres have
closed, transport
has reduced and
the general quality
of life of those
with a disability
has decreased
Creating wooden
ornaments for sale at
the Droitwich food
festival
These effects can then be polarised
when care provider organisations
answer to shareholders and big
business wishing to profit from care.
Everyone understands that in a
capitalist society, it is every business’s
right to profit from the work it does,
but we would wonder whether this is
appropriate in the social care sector,
where every pound of profit will
inevitably mean a pound less spent
on the most vulnerable people in
ourcountry.

www.newlandhurst.org.uk

This article was sponsored by Newland Hurst Care Home. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development