Newton Dee Camphill Community

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Newton Dee Camphill Community's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Newton Dee Camphill Community is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.newtondee.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL COMMUNITY
Elizabeth Simons sowing grain in
House Garden
A music and light show
put on by co-workers and
villagers in Newton Dee
Newton Dee, a Camphill community, is a charity based in
Aberdeen where “co-workers” and “villagers” cohabit to
live, work and make friends. Long-term co-worker Jacob
Vollrath explains that this core idea of a Camphill community
provides a mutually supportive environment for children, young
adults and adults with special needs – one where everyone has
a role. Jacob tells
The Parliamentary Review
that Newton Dee
provides residents with so much more than entertainment –
offering instead a purpose that brings real fulfilment to their lives.
The international Camphill movement began in Aberdeenshire with a few refugees
who needed to build a home for themselves. These individuals were not just
concerned with their own safety and survival, but also considered others who
were finding it difficult to be accepted and supported, most notably those with
special needs. The unique combination of refugees and children with special
needs needing somewhere to live and learn led to the beginnings of the Camphill
movement. The concept has since spread around the world and communities can
be found in North and South America, Europe, Africa and Asia.
While many aspects of the Camphill idea are remarkable, the one that is
particularly dear to my heart is that of the international volunteering which has
kept Camphill flourishing. To this day people travel across the globe to give
anywhere from a year up to a lifetime to live and work in Camphill communities.
Most return to their home country afterwards, while some go on to volunteer in
a different Camphill community in a different country. Some stay and become
non-salaried long-term co-workers, often due to the fact that they find something
FACTS ABOUT
NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL
COMMUNITY
»Long-term co-worker:
JacobVollrath
»Founded in 1960
»Located in Aberdeen
»Services: A home for adults
with special needs
»No. of employees: 85 co-
workers – short-term and
long-term
Newton Dee Camphill
Community
31NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL COMMUNITY |
COMMUNITY
or someone that entices them to stay.
Some leave convention behind and
dedicate their lives to shared living,
pooling resources and discovering
their own potential as well as
developing the potential of those they
share their lives with.
Strength in diversity
We meet so many different
people with different needs and
backgrounds. Cultural diversity
in a Camphill community is an
important basis for creating a rich
and interesting environment for and
with the residents. Our residents have
developed an understanding of the
world over the years, sharing their
lives with dedicated volunteers from
Germany, Denmark, France, Colombia,
South Korea, the US and more. They
know about customs in Spain and
Honduras and have met people from
Israel and Japan. They have been able
to work with volunteers from the
Netherlands and China, learning to
make bread in the bakery or to knit
socks in the textile workshop. In return,
the volunteers bring their enthusiasm,
curiosity and hobbies along as well
as the odd home-cooked meal. It is
this that makes life interesting and
colourful in a Camphill community,
and what makes it special.
There are currently only three
communities in Scotland left that
work with the non-salaried co-
worker model. Those staying on have
their needs met by the funds of the
community in a clear and accountable
fashion. All Camphill communities
across the world have volunteers who
spend six months to a year with them
and carry the knowledge they obtained
with them when they leave again.
European Unity
Newton Dee has been home to adults
with special needs for almost 75 years.
It is astounding to think that the model
is more under threat now than ever
before due to the ongoing drama
and uncertainty of Brexit. Britain’s
current political situation is making
volunteers think twice before coming
to Scotland when they have options in
othercountries.
Peter Mason in joinery
Our residents
have developed
an
understanding
of the world
over the years,
sharing their
lives with
dedicated
volunteers from
Germany,
Denmark,
France,
Colombia, South
Korea, the US
and more
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL COMMUNITY
Elizabeth Simons sowing grain in
House Garden
A music and light show
put on by co-workers and
villagers in Newton Dee
Newton Dee, a Camphill community, is a charity based in
Aberdeen where “co-workers” and “villagers” cohabit to
live, work and make friends. Long-term co-worker Jacob
Vollrath explains that this core idea of a Camphill community
provides a mutually supportive environment for children, young
adults and adults with special needs – one where everyone has
a role. Jacob tells
The Parliamentary Review
that Newton Dee
provides residents with so much more than entertainment –
offering instead a purpose that brings real fulfilment to their lives.
The international Camphill movement began in Aberdeenshire with a few refugees
who needed to build a home for themselves. These individuals were not just
concerned with their own safety and survival, but also considered others who
were finding it difficult to be accepted and supported, most notably those with
special needs. The unique combination of refugees and children with special
needs needing somewhere to live and learn led to the beginnings of the Camphill
movement. The concept has since spread around the world and communities can
be found in North and South America, Europe, Africa and Asia.
While many aspects of the Camphill idea are remarkable, the one that is
particularly dear to my heart is that of the international volunteering which has
kept Camphill flourishing. To this day people travel across the globe to give
anywhere from a year up to a lifetime to live and work in Camphill communities.
Most return to their home country afterwards, while some go on to volunteer in
a different Camphill community in a different country. Some stay and become
non-salaried long-term co-workers, often due to the fact that they find something
FACTS ABOUT
NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL
COMMUNITY
»Long-term co-worker:
JacobVollrath
»Founded in 1960
»Located in Aberdeen
»Services: A home for adults
with special needs
»No. of employees: 85 co-
workers – short-term and
long-term
Newton Dee Camphill
Community
31NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL COMMUNITY |
COMMUNITY
or someone that entices them to stay.
Some leave convention behind and
dedicate their lives to shared living,
pooling resources and discovering
their own potential as well as
developing the potential of those they
share their lives with.
Strength in diversity
We meet so many different
people with different needs and
backgrounds. Cultural diversity
in a Camphill community is an
important basis for creating a rich
and interesting environment for and
with the residents. Our residents have
developed an understanding of the
world over the years, sharing their
lives with dedicated volunteers from
Germany, Denmark, France, Colombia,
South Korea, the US and more. They
know about customs in Spain and
Honduras and have met people from
Israel and Japan. They have been able
to work with volunteers from the
Netherlands and China, learning to
make bread in the bakery or to knit
socks in the textile workshop. In return,
the volunteers bring their enthusiasm,
curiosity and hobbies along as well
as the odd home-cooked meal. It is
this that makes life interesting and
colourful in a Camphill community,
and what makes it special.
There are currently only three
communities in Scotland left that
work with the non-salaried co-
worker model. Those staying on have
their needs met by the funds of the
community in a clear and accountable
fashion. All Camphill communities
across the world have volunteers who
spend six months to a year with them
and carry the knowledge they obtained
with them when they leave again.
European Unity
Newton Dee has been home to adults
with special needs for almost 75 years.
It is astounding to think that the model
is more under threat now than ever
before due to the ongoing drama
and uncertainty of Brexit. Britain’s
current political situation is making
volunteers think twice before coming
to Scotland when they have options in
othercountries.
Peter Mason in joinery
Our residents
have developed
an
understanding
of the world
over the years,
sharing their
lives with
dedicated
volunteers from
Germany,
Denmark,
France,
Colombia, South
Korea, the US
and more
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | NEWTON DEE CAMPHILL COMMUNITY
Before the UK joined the European
Union, Camphill was so highly
regarded that foreign nationals would
receive special dispensation from the
Home Office until they could apply for
permanent residence due to the nature
of their unique and dedicated service
to people with special needs.
After the UK joined the EU, those from
overseas countries could only come for a
year on the tier five visa and on occasion
return for a second or third year. Due
to freedom of movement, we started to
rely more and more on EU volunteers –
at present it looks like we will lose this
opportunity as well. This will mean the
end of the Camphill community run by
volunteers who choose to live alongside
adults with special needs.
Our departure from the EU will spell
the end of equality between residents
and co-workers and make it harder to
build genuine relationships. Instead
more and more people will be involved
in shift systems with fewer or no funds
available to invest in the community. It
will widen the gap between short-term
volunteers and long-term co-workers
and instead of being able to retain those
few individuals who are committed
and competent for this unique lifestyle,
we will have to make different choices
that will make it harder to build and
maintain thecommunity.
Camphill visa
Living in a Camphill community is one
choice among many for people with
special needs. It does not suit everyone,
resident or co-worker. Those it does
suit can have a rich and fulfilling life
and the opportunity to form genuine
friendships with peers based on
freedom within a safeenvironment.
The only way to continue running
our community is to allow foreign
nationals to settle and dedicate their
lives to Camphill if they wish to do
so. We believe that a “Camphill visa”
for the first ten years of service in
a Camphill community could be a
straightforwardsolution.
We are currently looking into setting
up a space for elderly care, dedicated
to those with special needs in addition
to other later life demands. In a society
where there is a distinct lack of care
for the elderly, we believe there has
never been a more pertinent time to
deliver these aims.
Before the UK
joined the
European
Union,
Camphill was
so highly
regarded that
foreign
nationals
would receive
special
dispensation
from the
Home Office
Erol Tekvar with a
German volunteer

www.newtondee.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Newton Dee Camphill Community. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development