North Essex Teacher Training

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by North Essex Teacher Training's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from North Essex Teacher Training is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.nett.org.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | NORTH ESSEX TEACHER TRAINING
Primary trainees problem solving
Programme Director Dr Sarah Alix,
Primary Lead John Morgan and
Secondary Lead Jane Adamson
North Essex Teacher Training has 25 years of experience, 100
per cent employment rates and postgraduate certificates
awarded by the nearby University of Suffolk. Programme
Director Dr Sarah Alix tells
TheParliamentary Review
that it is
these accolades, among others, that make North Essex Teacher
Training one of the most prestigious establishments of its kind
in the country. She talks about how NETT has changed in recent
years, and how its development and innovation continues to
fuel great research and outstanding teaching.
North Essex Teacher Training is part of the Sigma Trust and is located in Clacton-
on-Sea in Essex, a small seaside town known for its social deprivation. We deliver
a one-year Initial Teacher Training programme with qualified teacher status and a
postgraduate certificate in Education with placements in secondary, primary, early
years and special education.
Our location makes it difficult to recruit both trainees and teachers into our local
schools. We started at NETT over 25 years ago with a secondary programme
to support and develop teacher recruitment. Initially, we focused purely on
secondary, but due to changes in funding, we merged with Tendring Hundred
Primary SCITT, which had been running for over 10 years, in 2017. This has
enabled the programmes to grow and for us to share expertise and resources right
across the teaching phases. This has been vital when juggling finances across the
programmes, as NETT is only viable if trainee teacher numbers are sufficient.
FACTS ABOUT
NORTH ESSEX TEACHER
TRAINING
»Programme Director:
Dr Sarah Alix
»Primary Programme Leader:
John Morgan
»Secondary Programme Leader:
Jane Adamson
»Established in 1994
»Based in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex
»Services: Teacher training
provider
»No. of employees: 8
North Essex Teacher
Training
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | NORTH ESSEX TEACHER TRAINING
Primary trainees problem solving
Programme Director Dr Sarah Alix,
Primary Lead John Morgan and
Secondary Lead Jane Adamson
North Essex Teacher Training has 25 years of experience, 100
per cent employment rates and postgraduate certificates
awarded by the nearby University of Suffolk. Programme
Director Dr Sarah Alix tells
TheParliamentary Review
that it is
these accolades, among others, that make North Essex Teacher
Training one of the most prestigious establishments of its kind
in the country. She talks about how NETT has changed in recent
years, and how its development and innovation continues to
fuel great research and outstanding teaching.
North Essex Teacher Training is part of the Sigma Trust and is located in Clacton-
on-Sea in Essex, a small seaside town known for its social deprivation. We deliver
a one-year Initial Teacher Training programme with qualified teacher status and a
postgraduate certificate in Education with placements in secondary, primary, early
years and special education.
Our location makes it difficult to recruit both trainees and teachers into our local
schools. We started at NETT over 25 years ago with a secondary programme
to support and develop teacher recruitment. Initially, we focused purely on
secondary, but due to changes in funding, we merged with Tendring Hundred
Primary SCITT, which had been running for over 10 years, in 2017. This has
enabled the programmes to grow and for us to share expertise and resources right
across the teaching phases. This has been vital when juggling finances across the
programmes, as NETT is only viable if trainee teacher numbers are sufficient.
FACTS ABOUT
NORTH ESSEX TEACHER
TRAINING
»Programme Director:
Dr Sarah Alix
»Primary Programme Leader:
John Morgan
»Secondary Programme Leader:
Jane Adamson
»Established in 1994
»Based in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex
»Services: Teacher training
provider
»No. of employees: 8
North Essex Teacher
Training
39NORTH ESSEX TEACHER TRAINING |
EDUCATION SERVICES
The merger provided some initial
challenges, as both schemes needed to
make adjustments to the processes and
quality assurance of their programmes
so that they became aligned with each
other acrossphases.
We work with a large range of
schools to provide experiences and
opportunities for our trainees. The
schools are both within and outside
of the Sigma Trust and support our
development of trainee teachers, who
then become part of their teaching
teams. We run a trainee internship
programme for those not yet ready
to apply to teacher training, which
secures experience for them in schools,
supported by our staff. This enables
them to develop their skills before they
enter teacher training.
It is our aim for all trainees to leave
us as competent and independent
teachers with a true sense of identity
and a self-belief and abiding respect
for others. We aim to instil a lifelong
love for learning and a strong
grounding for future success.
At North Essex Teacher Training, we
take pride in developing teachers who
are confident, competent and of an
outstanding quality to work within our
schools, with a view to them aspiring
to leadership posts, thus securing
succession planning.
Developing projects – working
with higher education institutes
We are developing our work with HEIs
locally to support undergraduates on
their routes to obtaining QTS and a
career in teaching. There are no such
providers locally, and therefore it is
vital that our work with them supports
undergraduate pathways into teaching.
We are in the process of developing
a route with Anglia Ruskin University,
along with other providers, to create a
pathway from their two-year accelerated
primary educational studies degree
course. We are also in development
with the University of Suffolk to write a
course for a three-year undergraduate
degree with QTS to be delivered here
at NETT along with other providers.
Both of these routes have the potential
to be developed or linked with an
undergraduate apprenticeship route
in the future. This would help schools
to access the apprenticeship levy to
support funding. However, we have
found the postgraduate apprenticeship
route to have no take-up here
at NETT, as other routes offer a
similarexperience.
Secondary trainees
working collaboratively
in our extensive library
Primary trainees discuss
educational theory
It is our aim for
all trainees to
leave us as
competent and
independent
teachers with a
true sense of
identity and a
self-belief and
abiding respect
for others
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | NORTH ESSEX TEACHER TRAINING
Review of
Parliament
Thousands gathered
in Parliament Square
to celebrate the UK’s
departure from the EU
“We’re out”
“The British people have spoken,” said the
affable BBC anchorman, David Dimbleby,
“and the answer is: we’reout.”
This was just after 5am on the morning
of Friday, June 24, 2016.
In the end, it took three years, seven
months, seven days and eighteen hours.
It took three prime ministers. Two general
elections. It took, shock-of-shocks,
two
hosts of the BBC’s Question Time. Yes,
dear old Dimbleby himself, who had
chaired that veritable feast of Thursday-
night verbal flagellation since 1994, left
the hotseat a full year before Britain finally
left the European Union. But it did happen.
At 11pm on January 31, 2020, Britain
ceased to be an EU country. The EU was
now comprised of 27 member states rather
than 28. And although, with a transition
period in place, little else of substance
had changed, there was no doubting the
historic significance of the moment.
Addressing the nation from Downing
Street, the prime minister spoke of the
dawn of a new era and the potential for
meaningful and far reaching change:
“This is not an end but a beginning. This
is the moment the dawn breaks and
the curtain goes up on a new act in our
great nationaldrama.”
He spoke about the opportunities
this moment would provide, such as
controlling immigration, creating free
ports, “liberating” our fishing industry,
doing free trade deals or “simply making
our rules and laws for the benefit of the
people of this country.”
A cricket ball’s throw away in Parliament
Square, thousands gathered for a Brexit
party, fronted by The Brexit Party. This
nascent political grouping, not yet a
year old, appeared pretty pleased with
themselves as they swayed and crooned
with the crowd. In winning May’s
European elections, they had precipitated
Theresa May’s departure, ensured her
successor was a paid-up Leave supporter,
and had helped make Brexit a reality.
In a statement, MrsMay declared that
“after more than three years, we can
finally say we have delivered on the
result of the 2016 referendum and have
kept faith with the Britishpeople.”
Outgoing Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn
said: “Britain’s place in the world will
change. The question is what direction
we now take. Wecan build a truly
internationalist, diverse and outward-
looking Britain. Or we can turn inwards,
and trade our principles, rights and
standards to secure hastily arranged,
one-sided, race-to-the-bottom trade
deals with Donald Trump and others.”
Speaking for the EU, Michel Barnier
expressed his sadness, while Donald Tusk
said: “My dear British friends. We were, we
are, and we will always be a community.
And no Brexit will ever change that.”
And so with a mix of jubilation,
apprehension and sadness, the words
spoken by David Dimbleby in the early
hours of June 24, 2016 were now a
reality. We were out.
Developing projects – research
We are furthering our work in the
area of research and evidence-based
practice. This is essential to the
development of our trainees and
future teachers. It provides them
with the knowledge and experience
of research in schools to improve
their own practice and that of their
employing school. We have developed
a Sigma research hub, which supports
teachers and trainees to become more
involved in research and to share
evidence-based practice to a wider
audience. Trainees conduct a piece of
research as part of their PGCE, and
then a number of trainees produce
work for conference attendance
andpublication.
Research has been supported by
the introduction of the Chartered
College of Teaching, of which all three
directors are founding fellows. The
CCT’s
Impact
journal has provided the
opportunity for publication by both
staff and trainees in various forms,
be that posters, papers or member
insights, and journal papers provide
practice-based research for trainees
toexamine.
We host our own conference days on
key areas of learning such as behaviour
management, metacognition, and
learning theories and technologies.
These sessions include trainees, NQTs,
internship trainees and teachers from
local schools.
Meeting growing demand
NETT has undergone a period of
change and development with the
merging of programmes and is
now stronger in terms of expertise,
resourcing and partnerships. However,
challenges are continuous. Recruitment
to the programmes remains a priority
as the programmes run, and are
budgeted for, annually depending
on trainee numbers. As we support
ourselves through the fees we charge
our students, if student fees are cut,
this will directly impact on how the
provision is run, how resources are
managed and how staffing supports
trainees. Our aim is for our trainee
teachers to leave the programmes as
confident and competent teachers
with embedded practice. This takes
support and personalisation of the
programmes, which may be reduced
if funding does not top up any
feechanges.
Our aim is to develop outstanding,
resilient teachers who are employed
in our local schools. With the
expansion of schools and housing,
and Colchester nearby, which is the
fastest-growing city in the country,
we need to ensure that there are
enough trainee teachers to meet
local demand. Employability from
our provision is 100 per cent, and
expansion of the programmes through
work such as the development of
undergraduate programmes and
apprenticeships is needed in order to
meet this growingdemand.
Our aim is to
develop
outstanding,
resilient
teachers who
are employed
in our local
schools
Secondary trainees
using evidence-based
practice to support their
discussions

www.nett.org.uk

This article was sponsored by North Essex Teacher Training. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development