Orione Care

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Orione Care's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Orione Care is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.orionecare.org

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | ORIONE CARE
Saint Luigi Orione
Housing, care and support
service in Teddington
The Sons of Divine Providence is a Roman Catholic
religious congregation, founded in Italy in 1893. The
Congregation takes inspiration from its founder Saint
Luigi Orione, known as Don Orione. Don Orione’s motto was:
“Do good always, do good to all, harm nobody”
. Don Orione is
remembered for his commitment to social justice and the service
of those in need, a service guided and inspired by the teachings
of the Catholic Church. The Sons of Divine Providence came
to England in 1949, and in 2009 adopted
Orione Care
as the
operational name for the charity. The secretary of the charity,
Michael Healy, tells
The Parliamentary Review
more.
Don Orione began his work with orphans and street children in the city of
Tortona, in Italy, while he was still a student. He was a man of enormous energy
and enterprise, and by the time of his death in 1940 he and his followers had
established services for the care of elderly, disabled and disadvantaged people
all over Italy, as well as in Poland, Brazil, Argentina and Palestine. Today, nearly a
thousand priests and brothers of the congregation work in 33 countries around the
world, providing services for more than 200,000 people in a variety of health and
social care projects.
The driving force behind the establishment of The Sons of Divine Providence
in England was the late Father Paul Bidone, who had joined the Congregation
following a personal encounter with Don Orione. The story is that Father Bidone
came to England in 1949 with ten shillings and the name of only one British
contact. To add to the difficulty of his mission Father Bidone spoke no English,
FACTS ABOUT
ORIONE CARE
»Founder: Saint Luigi Orione
»Secretary: Michael Healy
»Established in 1952
»Headquarters in Hampton
Wick
»Services: Housing, residential
and day care
»No. of employees: 70
»Registered charity and
registered provider of social
housing
Orione Care
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | ORIONE CARE
Saint Luigi Orione
Housing, care and support
service in Teddington
The Sons of Divine Providence is a Roman Catholic
religious congregation, founded in Italy in 1893. The
Congregation takes inspiration from its founder Saint
Luigi Orione, known as Don Orione. Don Orione’s motto was:
“Do good always, do good to all, harm nobody”
. Don Orione is
remembered for his commitment to social justice and the service
of those in need, a service guided and inspired by the teachings
of the Catholic Church. The Sons of Divine Providence came
to England in 1949, and in 2009 adopted
Orione Care
as the
operational name for the charity. The secretary of the charity,
Michael Healy, tells
The Parliamentary Review
more.
Don Orione began his work with orphans and street children in the city of
Tortona, in Italy, while he was still a student. He was a man of enormous energy
and enterprise, and by the time of his death in 1940 he and his followers had
established services for the care of elderly, disabled and disadvantaged people
all over Italy, as well as in Poland, Brazil, Argentina and Palestine. Today, nearly a
thousand priests and brothers of the congregation work in 33 countries around the
world, providing services for more than 200,000 people in a variety of health and
social care projects.
The driving force behind the establishment of The Sons of Divine Providence
in England was the late Father Paul Bidone, who had joined the Congregation
following a personal encounter with Don Orione. The story is that Father Bidone
came to England in 1949 with ten shillings and the name of only one British
contact. To add to the difficulty of his mission Father Bidone spoke no English,
FACTS ABOUT
ORIONE CARE
»Founder: Saint Luigi Orione
»Secretary: Michael Healy
»Established in 1952
»Headquarters in Hampton
Wick
»Services: Housing, residential
and day care
»No. of employees: 70
»Registered charity and
registered provider of social
housing
Orione Care
43ORIONE CARE |
CARE
although he was fortunate in that
one of his first English tutors was the
celebrated writer Hillaire Belloc.
Father Bidone also developed a
friendship with the renowned
commentator and satirist Malcolm
Muggeridge, and was influential in his
decision to join the Catholic Church.
Malcolm Muggeridge would later
come to describe his friend as “a priest
of rare and subtle holiness”. What is
undeniable also is that Father Bidone
was remarkably shrewd, determined
and very adept at networking and
fundraising. Within three years of
arriving in England, Father Bidone had
established a home for elderly homeless
men in Streatham. This was to be
the first of many services established
by The Sons of Divine Providence for
older people and people with learning
disabilities in London, the South East
and Lancashire. These services were
based in properties which were acquired
by Father Bidone through his hard work,
the generosity of benefactors and his
genuine trust in divine providence.
Many of the services established
by Father Bidone were residential
care homes. Since Father Bidone’s
death in 1986, we have seen this
particular model of providing care
and accommodation to older people
and people with disabilities falling out
of favour with local authorities and
service users. People now want services
which are less restrictive and which
give them more independence.
Moving away from residential
care
It is also true to say that over the
same period the charity has found it
increasingly difficult to run residential
care services as costs have increased
and the money being made available
by local authorities to fund the care
provided has not kept pace.
Over the last 20 years we have
responded by gradually moving away
from residential care. This has been
partly by force of circumstances and
partly by design, but the effect is that
we now see our future as a provider of
housing rather than a provider of care.
Many of the people who live in our
accommodation still need support, but
it is provided by external care providers.
I think this model gives our tenants
more of a say over the care they receive
and who should provide it; it also gives
them more security because they are
not relying on just one organisation to
provide both housing and support.
Residential care service
in Surrey
Do good
always, do
good to all,
harm nobody
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
44 | ORIONE CARE
One of Father Bidone’s legacies to the
charity is the land and buildings we
now own. This has left us well off in
terms of property, although less so in
terms of cash; and while it was evident
that some of our buildings were unfit
for their purpose, we did not have the
funds to improve or convert them.
Diversifying into housing with
support
Two years’ ago, after closing Orione
House, our large care home in
Hampton Wick, we came into contact
with Lifestyle Residences, a property
company led by an experienced
developer, John O’Neill. Working with
Lifestyle Residences we began to look
at our property portfolio and how we
might use our assets more effectively
for the benefits of the charity. We
have now developed a plan which we
believe will ensure the sustainability of
the charity, improve and increase our
social housing stock and support the
religious congregation’s pastoral work
in the UK and its missions overseas.
The first step on this journey was to
look at the future use of Orione House.
We decided to demolish the building
and build 28 flats on the site which will
be sold on long leases for older people
in need of care.
We have had to approach the project
with a commercial eye, and we have
had to borrow large amounts of
money in order to fund it. Fortunately,
we have found lenders who share our
objectives and are willing to be flexible
in their lending criteria.
On completion of the new building,
to be called Mulberry Court, we will
have created good quality housing
for older people, enhanced the local
environment with an impressive new
building and landscaped gardens,
and raised the funds to enable us to
provide more social housing locally.
We will also have a model for the
future redevelopment of other parts of
the charity’s property portfolio.
Seventy years after Father Bidone
arrived in England, we look forward to
a sustainable future. We hope Orione
Care will continue to “
Do good always,
do good to all and harm nobody”
relying
on the property legacy which has been
handed on to us, the support of friends
and benefactors, the professionalism of
our advisors and partners and of course
divineprovidence.
We have
developed a
plan which we
hope will
ensure the
sustainability
of the charity
CGI of the proposed
Mulberry Court in
Hampton Wick

www.orionecare.org

This article was sponsored by Orione Care. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development