Pavilion Dance South West

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Pavilion Dance South West's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Pavilion Dance South West is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.pdsw.org.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
50 | NAVY WINGS
on General Aviation, is now addressing
the issues of manufacturer liability, tax
and the disposal of MODassets.
Finally, to operate these additional
aircraft, we must almost double our
annual income from about £650,000
to just over £1,000,000 within the next
five years. This is a not inconsiderable
challenge, but we have a plan to
deliver this increase and are already
seeing tangible rises in our income
from sales of merchandise, coupled
with a growing supporter base.
Inspiring future innovation
The future is bright. Once the Royal
Navy aircraft are transferred to us,
we will have the largest collection
of operational, historic naval aircraft
in this country, if not the world.
Along with our privately owned, but
affiliated, associate collection, we now
have aircraft ranging from the Royal
Naval Air Service in the Great War,
through the Second World War to the
post-Cold War era, with several other
exciting projects in the pipeline.
The story of maritime aviation, from
both aircraft carriers and small ships,
is one in which the UK played the
leading role, pioneering almost every
world-leading technical innovation.
Operationally, whether shooting down
zeppelins or conducting the world’s
first strategic bombing raid in the
Great War, sinking the Bismarck in
the Second World War, or supporting
troops in Afghanistan and Iraq,
Royal Navy aircrew, along with their
engineering and ground support
teams, have been at the front line for
over 100 years.
Aerospace and aviation rely heavily
on technological innovation, and
the achievements of naval flying can
inspire and encourage the skills of
inventiveness and problem-solving so
crucially needed in our modern world.
This narrative is an important one
for the nation, and it is now being
delivered by a small charity based
at Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton
in Somerset, which is punching way
above its weight in its mission to tell
this exhilarating story.
The future is
bright... we
will have the
largest
collection of
operational,
historic naval
aircraft in this
country, if not
the world
Sea Vixen – the last
flying example in the
world of this historic
Cold War jet
51PAVILION DANCE SOUTH WEST |
COMMUNITY
CEO Zannah Chisholm
Dancing terraces at PDSW
Pavilion Dance South West, or PDSW for short, is a
registered charity that is dedicated to transforming
communities through dance. These communities, CEO
Zannah Chisholm tells
The Parliamentary Review
, might be
professional choreographers or a contingent of producers – or
they could be a group of people living with Parkinson’s. The
blueprint for all PDSW projects is the same: a desire to enable
communities to enjoy creativity and wellbeing through dance.
Zannah says that the PDSW team believe that dance is for
everyone – and they want that to be visible in the work they do.
I became CEO of Pavilion Dance South West in 2017 with the intention of
providing a clear answer to the deceptively simple question: “What difference does
PDSW make?” I have given a great deal of consideration to this question and have
endeavoured to implement changes that put the people we make a difference to in
the front and centre of our work.
We have a theatre and studios at Pavilion Dance next to Bournemouth Pier and
will celebrate our tenth anniversary in this venue in 2020. Having a building has
enabled us to provide space for the creation and performance of professional
dance and offer classes and events for people of all ages who want to dance – this
spans from contemporary to African, from Bollywood to capoeira.
Our turnover is currently £1 million, and we have grown to 27 staff.
We have three goals: to be a centre of excellence for socially relevant dance
across the South West and the UK, to play a strong civic role in Bournemouth,
FACTS ABOUT
PAVILION DANCE SOUTH WEST
»CEO: Zannah Chisholm
»Founded in 1996
»Located in Bournemouth
»Services: Bringing dance into
people’s lives
»No. of employees: 27
Pavilion Dance South
West
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
52 | PAVILION DANCE SOUTH WEST
Christchurch and Poole and its
hinterland and to be a fabulous place
to work, helping to build conditions for
a healthy sector.
We celebrate the art form of dance,
working with highly-skilled and
respected dance artists to bring the best
possible experiences to members of the
public; we aim to leave animpression
behind – a memory, knowledge, skill
or perhaps a newrelationship.
People and profession
For three years we have been leading
a UK-wide programme, Surf the
Wave. Artists, audiences, producers
and programmers have been looking
at ways of developing touring and
distribution models for small to mid-
scale dance. This has been funded by
three of the UK’s Arts Councils, as
well as private support. We hope the
project will bring about game-changing
approaches to showcasingdance.
The UK Dance Showcase in
2019 brought 203 delegates to
Bournemouth and Poole to buy work
from 43 dance companies. Many
delegates had never been here before
and enjoyed looking around, as well as
seeing the wealth of work. These kinds
of programmes illustrate the place-
making potential of culturalevents.
We are proud of the greater diversity
of people engaging with us in recent
years. Our Critical Friends Equality
Group meets annually to advise and
challenge us in accordance with the
2010 Equality Act and with their advice
we have created three “themes” for
accessibility and inclusion: “open
doors”, “hold hands” and “see myself”.
We apply these equally to, for example,
supporting artists or to strengthening
our relationships with African,
Caribbean and Indiancommunities.
Success can be demonstrated through
the stories of the impact of dance on
individuals who we work with: Rod
who values the Parkinson’s dance
classes so much he has become our
greatest fundraiser; Meena who
attends African dance classes and says
that “dancing is an expression of joy
and love”; Marcel, aged seven, who
Rod Cossou
We celebrate
the art form
of dance,
working with
highly-skilled
and respected
dance artists
to bring the
best possible
experiences to
members of
the public
Marcel Rees
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
52 | PAVILION DANCE SOUTH WEST
Christchurch and Poole and its
hinterland and to be a fabulous place
to work, helping to build conditions for
a healthy sector.
We celebrate the art form of dance,
working with highly-skilled and
respected dance artists to bring the best
possible experiences to members of the
public; we aim to leave animpression
behind – a memory, knowledge, skill
or perhaps a newrelationship.
People and profession
For three years we have been leading
a UK-wide programme, Surf the
Wave. Artists, audiences, producers
and programmers have been looking
at ways of developing touring and
distribution models for small to mid-
scale dance. This has been funded by
three of the UK’s Arts Councils, as
well as private support. We hope the
project will bring about game-changing
approaches to showcasingdance.
The UK Dance Showcase in
2019 brought 203 delegates to
Bournemouth and Poole to buy work
from 43 dance companies. Many
delegates had never been here before
and enjoyed looking around, as well as
seeing the wealth of work. These kinds
of programmes illustrate the place-
making potential of culturalevents.
We are proud of the greater diversity
of people engaging with us in recent
years. Our Critical Friends Equality
Group meets annually to advise and
challenge us in accordance with the
2010 Equality Act and with their advice
we have created three “themes” for
accessibility and inclusion: “open
doors”, “hold hands” and “see myself”.
We apply these equally to, for example,
supporting artists or to strengthening
our relationships with African,
Caribbean and Indiancommunities.
Success can be demonstrated through
the stories of the impact of dance on
individuals who we work with: Rod
who values the Parkinson’s dance
classes so much he has become our
greatest fundraiser; Meena who
attends African dance classes and says
that “dancing is an expression of joy
and love”; Marcel, aged seven, who
Rod Cossou
We celebrate
the art form
of dance,
working with
highly-skilled
and respected
dance artists
to bring the
best possible
experiences to
members of
the public
Marcel Rees
53PAVILION DANCE SOUTH WEST |
COMMUNITY
says that “seeing the awesome dancers
makes me want to dance too”; and
Joli Vyann, a professional circus and
dance company we support who tour
globally. We replaced the banners on
the front of our building in 2019 with
images of these people, each with their
story of why they love dancing with us.
The arts and creativity
Our people-centred principles extend
to our workforce. In April 2019 we
became a real living wage employer
and invested in a confidential
employee care package that gives staff
and their families access to the advice
and counselling support they need.
We have flexible and remote working
policies which enable people who
have caring responsibilities, or are
managing conditions themselves, to
work with us. We do an annual staff
survey and act on feedback given.
Staff are encouraged to train and take
ownership of their programmes.
The stories we have show the social
relevance of our work, but we must also
continue to value dance as an art form
that requires discipline andtraining.
There is a trend at policy level moving
away from the arts, towards the all-
inclusive term of creativity, which can
be applied to engineering and science
as well as to dance and music.
I call on policymakers to continue to
recognise the unique value of the
arts. I believe that focusing on the
more fluid concept of creativity will
ultimately be self-defeating.
A more equal future
The Arts Council’s Creative Case for
Diversity recognises the need to increase
the number of women in senior arts
leadership positions. Policymakers need
to embrace the fact that success looks
different today – it does not have to
be about a personality-led, competitive
approach. We need to put more female
arts leaders at the table so they can
help plan for major cultural and cross-
sectorprogrammes.
There are other challenges for our
future: the removal of dance as a pure
subject across schools reduces the
number of dancers ready to move into
full-time training.
The increased use of digital working
brings immense access to data capture
which we have to learn to manage and
use without drowning in it.
Public policymakers need to make
tough decisions about funding, while
also maintaining open and transparent
channels of communication. There are
genuine partnership opportunities for
policymakers and the sector to make a
positive difference to society through
the art form of dance. At PDSW,
we are looking ahead to innovate,
adapt and ensure that dance touches
everyone’s lives.
O
ur Critical
Friends Equality
Group meets
annually and
with their advice
we have created
three ‘themes’
for accessibility
and inclusion:
‘open doors’,
‘hold hands’ and
‘see
myself’
Meena Kaur

www.pdsw.org.uk

This article was sponsored by Pavilion Dance South West. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development