People Plus

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by People Plus's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from People Plus is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

peopleplus.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
15PEOPLEPLUS |
EDUCATION SERVICES
Group Managing Director
Simon Rouse
Making a direct difference to the
lives of one million people by 2022
The 21st century labour market is changing rapidly thanks to
the forces of globalisation and technological advancement.
With high levels of employment, there is a real opportunity
for government, training providers and employers to work
collaboratively to address disparities in regional productivity
as well as the difficulties faced by people who struggle to find
sustainable employment. Group Managing Director at PeoplePlus,
Simon Rouse, discusses the employment market and the need for
a new model to drive inclusive growth.
The UK has enjoyed a jobs boom in recent years and that is to be welcomed. It
reflects the hard work of employers and consecutive governments to promote
recovery since the Great Recession, yet it is widely recognised right across the
political spectrum that the benefits of growth continue to be unevenly shared and
that more needs to be done to encourage greater prosperity for all.
ONS figures to December 2019 show that, while almost 33 million people are in
work and the number of unemployed people has fallen, there has been an increase
in the number of people not in work or classed as economically active.
Finding a new job can be a stressful and challenging experience, even for those
who are prepared to change jobs during the course of their careers. For those
without established career paths, some of whom may not previously have held
down sustained employment, the stress of unemployment can be overwhelming.
With the growth of average earnings also falling, we are in a situation where
some areas of the country are doing significantly better than others. Tackling these
FACTS ABOUT
PEOPLEPLUS
»Group Managing Director:
SimonRouse
»Services delivered across the
UK
»Services: Apprenticeships, skills
development and training,
work with the self-employed
and delivery of prison education
and probationservices
»Largest independent provider
of prison education, operating
in 45 UK prisons
»Leading provider of levy-
funded apprenticeships,
with 19,000 apprenticeships
delivered
»Leading provider of business
start-up support, with
100,000 unemployed people
supported
»No. of employees: 1,700
PeoplePlus
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | PEOPLEPLUS
disparities and supporting equitable
growth is critically important to us
atPeoplePlus.
To do this, we need not just to make
sure that more people are trained for
jobs, but that we work to make the
landscape of skills and recruitment
easier to navigate for all concerned.
This puts a responsibility on all of us in
training and recruitment to continually
improve and adapt our approach.
Intelligent Routeway
Framework
The challenge of unequal growth
has felt intractable, but it is not an
inevitability. To build an economy
based upon more inclusive growth,
however, we need more than just
tailored skills support. We also need
accurate intelligence regarding local
labour market demand and an effective
way to forecast employer need which
then subsequently informs regional
skills and training need. By aligning
these things and moving away from
a “skills first” approach we can stop
training people for jobs that don’t exist.
This conundrum is the genesis of our
Intelligent Routeway Framework – an
interface between training providers
that can determine which jobs are
available and match them against
individuals, taking into account their
training needs as well as identifying
the training providers in each area best
placed to support delivery.
The IRF creates an “employment
superhighway” with the potential to
help everyone on it: the job seeker
whose chances of achieving sustained
employment are improved, the training
provider and ultimately the funding
body whose skills support efforts
areoptimised.
Transforming the skills
landscape
Addressing the productivity gap
between the UK and other major
world economies has long been a
challenge for successive governments,
with stagnating productivity having
had a notable impact on earnings
since the financial crisis. Transforming
the skills landscape to tackle this
competitive challenge more effectively
is key, particularly when we look
at the impact it has at a regional
level, with lower productivity levels
leading to much higher levels
ofunemployment.
Macroeconomic levers alone cannot
solve this. We need a different
approach, one where we get local
details right in order to meet the skills
needs of our communities.
Working together to
enable inclusive growth
We have a
commitment
to helping one
million people
by 2022 and
we are well on
our way to
meeting that
goal
17PEOPLEPLUS |
EDUCATION SERVICES
One of the biggest challenges with the
skills landscape is fragmentation. At
present, there are around 20 different
funding streams all trying to boost
skills development in our regions and
tackle the UK’s productivity challenge.
This fragmentation is the challenge
that needs to be addressed.
In simple terms, we could and
should focus on a more collaborative
approach to drive better outcomes.
With more effective use of data to
tackle large-scale employment need
and address the fragmented training
base nationally, combined with a way
of linking employers and a network
of training providers, we will be
driven by the long-missed intelligence
which is needed for better, more
tailoredtraining.
Helping those who are
disadvantaged in the labour
market
There are many employers who want
to make a positive impact on society
and, through their core business
operations, they can support the
communities in which they operate by
recruiting and training individuals who
have previously struggled to get jobs
and keep jobs.
The IRF model taps into this potential
and the willingness that employers
demonstrate to carry out their business
activities in a way that benefits
society. It also harnesses the unlocked
potential of many people who are
unemployed or economically inactive
– because it ensures employers who
want to make a positive impact can
access, train and recruit people from
disadvantaged groups. This could, for
example, include young people not
in employment, education or training
– NEETs – or ex-offenders who face
significant challenges when trying
to secure jobs, including access to
information about vacancies, guidance
and specific skills training.
A win-win-win situation
This collaborative, intelligence-driven
approach to skills is important because it
gives us the best chance of positioning
individuals successfully into work for
jobs that actually exist, meeting the
needs of the employer and of the job
seeker. We are far more likely to end up
with the right people in the right jobs,
strengthening key industrial sectors
which are critical to regional inclusive
growth strategies.
We will truly offer a win-win-win
situation if we embrace change and use
it to drive a better alignment between
skills and employer need. This is true for
job seekers regardless of background,
for employers and for communities
across the UK.
Ultimately, this successful sustained
inclusive growth regionally will add up
to success nationally – helping to tackle
the deep-seated productivity challenge
that has characterised the UK economy
for many decades.
We will truly
offer a win-win-
win situation if
we embrace
change and use
it to drive a
better alignment
between skills
and employer
need
Helping people to
transform their lives
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | PEOPLEPLUS
disparities and supporting equitable
growth is critically important to us
atPeoplePlus.
To do this, we need not just to make
sure that more people are trained for
jobs, but that we work to make the
landscape of skills and recruitment
easier to navigate for all concerned.
This puts a responsibility on all of us in
training and recruitment to continually
improve and adapt our approach.
Intelligent Routeway
Framework
The challenge of unequal growth
has felt intractable, but it is not an
inevitability. To build an economy
based upon more inclusive growth,
however, we need more than just
tailored skills support. We also need
accurate intelligence regarding local
labour market demand and an effective
way to forecast employer need which
then subsequently informs regional
skills and training need. By aligning
these things and moving away from
a “skills first” approach we can stop
training people for jobs that don’t exist.
This conundrum is the genesis of our
Intelligent Routeway Framework – an
interface between training providers
that can determine which jobs are
available and match them against
individuals, taking into account their
training needs as well as identifying
the training providers in each area best
placed to support delivery.
The IRF creates an “employment
superhighway” with the potential to
help everyone on it: the job seeker
whose chances of achieving sustained
employment are improved, the training
provider and ultimately the funding
body whose skills support efforts
areoptimised.
Transforming the skills
landscape
Addressing the productivity gap
between the UK and other major
world economies has long been a
challenge for successive governments,
with stagnating productivity having
had a notable impact on earnings
since the financial crisis. Transforming
the skills landscape to tackle this
competitive challenge more effectively
is key, particularly when we look
at the impact it has at a regional
level, with lower productivity levels
leading to much higher levels
ofunemployment.
Macroeconomic levers alone cannot
solve this. We need a different
approach, one where we get local
details right in order to meet the skills
needs of our communities.
Working together to
enable inclusive growth
We have a
commitment
to helping one
million people
by 2022 and
we are well on
our way to
meeting that
goal
17PEOPLEPLUS |
EDUCATION SERVICES
One of the biggest challenges with the
skills landscape is fragmentation. At
present, there are around 20 different
funding streams all trying to boost
skills development in our regions and
tackle the UK’s productivity challenge.
This fragmentation is the challenge
that needs to be addressed.
In simple terms, we could and
should focus on a more collaborative
approach to drive better outcomes.
With more effective use of data to
tackle large-scale employment need
and address the fragmented training
base nationally, combined with a way
of linking employers and a network
of training providers, we will be
driven by the long-missed intelligence
which is needed for better, more
tailoredtraining.
Helping those who are
disadvantaged in the labour
market
There are many employers who want
to make a positive impact on society
and, through their core business
operations, they can support the
communities in which they operate by
recruiting and training individuals who
have previously struggled to get jobs
and keep jobs.
The IRF model taps into this potential
and the willingness that employers
demonstrate to carry out their business
activities in a way that benefits
society. It also harnesses the unlocked
potential of many people who are
unemployed or economically inactive
– because it ensures employers who
want to make a positive impact can
access, train and recruit people from
disadvantaged groups. This could, for
example, include young people not
in employment, education or training
– NEETs – or ex-offenders who face
significant challenges when trying
to secure jobs, including access to
information about vacancies, guidance
and specific skills training.
A win-win-win situation
This collaborative, intelligence-driven
approach to skills is important because it
gives us the best chance of positioning
individuals successfully into work for
jobs that actually exist, meeting the
needs of the employer and of the job
seeker. We are far more likely to end up
with the right people in the right jobs,
strengthening key industrial sectors
which are critical to regional inclusive
growth strategies.
We will truly offer a win-win-win
situation if we embrace change and use
it to drive a better alignment between
skills and employer need. This is true for
job seekers regardless of background,
for employers and for communities
across the UK.
Ultimately, this successful sustained
inclusive growth regionally will add up
to success nationally – helping to tackle
the deep-seated productivity challenge
that has characterised the UK economy
for many decades.
We will truly
offer a win-win-
win situation if
we embrace
change and use
it to drive a
better alignment
between skills
and employer
need
Helping people to
transform their lives

peopleplus.co.uk

This article was sponsored by People Plus. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development