Preston Park Primary School

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Preston Park Primary School's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Preston Park Primary School is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.prestonparkschool.co.uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
6| REVIEW OF THE YEAR
The proportion of students in England
who got a place in their first-choice
secondary school was the lowest for a
decade this year.
Children offered their first choice dropped
from 83.2 per cent in 2010/11 to 80.9
per cent this year, while the proportion
with an offer from any of their preferred
schools dropped from 96.6 per cent to
94.8 per cent during the same period.
Overall, 93 per cent of applications had an
offer from one of their top three choices.
Almost 115,500 children did not get
into their first-choice secondary school
this September, compared with 104,300
in2018.
The lower satisfaction figures come
as a pupil bulge moves from primary
to secondary schooling. Secondary
applications were at their lowest in 2013
and have risen by 20.9 per cent since.
Applications to local authorities rose by
3.7 per cent this year to 604,500.
However, the proportion of children getting
into their first-choice primary school also fell
from 91 per cent to 90.6 per cent despite
the number of applications remaining
virtually unchanged.
Helping children fleeing domestic abuse
get school places more quickly is part
of a package of measures announced
by Damian Hinds, the former education
secretary, in a major speech in June.
“We understand children in care have very
poor outcomes,” said Mr Hinds, adding:
“Actually the truth is the outcomes for
children in need of a social worker are
almost as bad but there are five times as
many of them.
“We also know the effects of this sustain.
Overall if you’ve needed contact with a
social worker at any time since year 5, on
average you are going to score 20 grades
lower across eight GCSEs.
“We need to improve the visibility of this
group, both in schools and in the system
as a whole… and improve our knowledge
of what works to support and help
these children. We must not lower our
expectations for them – for these children
it is more important that they can do their
very best to make the most of their talents
when they’re at school.”
Schools will also receive guidance on how
to use the pupil premium – extra funding
given for disadvantaged children – most
effectively.
Undoubtedly, some of the schools
who will receive such guidance are
featured in this document. The pupil
premium has been a significant focus
for
TheParliamentary Review
in years
past, and so it is this year for many of the
representatives that follow.
Fifth of pupils don’t get their first-choice secondary school
Plans to support the most disadvantaged children
teaching must continue to reflect the law
“including the Equality Act, as it applies to
relationships, so that young people clearly
understand what the law allows and does
not allow.”
However, consultation around the
associated guidance appears to have
drawn the attention of religious activists
to what was being taught in schools in
Birmingham and elsewhere.
A focus for many of the early protests
was schools teaching the No Outsid ers
programme created at another
Birmingham school, Parkfield Community
School, by assistant headteacher Andrew
Moffat. It teaches positive values of
diversity, tolerance and acceptance as
part of a curriculum including same-sex
parents, race, religion and colour.
Mr Moffat – who was shortlisted for the
Global Teacher Prize in February – found
his own No Outsiders lessons suspended
in March while talks with parents took
place. His programme’s backers included
Ofsted’s Chief Inspector Amanda
Spielman, who said it was important that
children learned about families with two
mummies or two daddies.
Primary schools in
Birmingham were
sites of protest after
sex education classes
covered LGBT values
Under new measures,
children from
abusive households
will be able to get
placements in schools
much more quickly
7PRESTON PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
The proportion of students in England
who got a place in their first-choice
secondary school was the lowest for a
decade this year.
Children offered their first choice dropped
from 83.2 per cent in 2010/11 to 80.9
per cent this year, while the proportion
with an offer from any of their preferred
schools dropped from 96.6 per cent to
94.8 per cent during the same period.
Overall, 93 per cent of applications had an
offer from one of their top three choices.
Almost 115,500 children did not get
into their first-choice secondary school
this September, compared with 104,300
in2018.
The lower satisfaction figures come
as a pupil bulge moves from primary
to secondary schooling. Secondary
applications were at their lowest in 2013
and have risen by 20.9 per cent since.
Applications to local authorities rose by
3.7 per cent this year to 604,500.
However, the proportion of children getting
into their first-choice primary school also fell
from 91 per cent to 90.6 per cent despite
the number of applications remaining
virtually unchanged.
Helping children fleeing domestic abuse
get school places more quickly is part
of a package of measures announced
by Damian Hinds, the former education
secretary, in a major speech in June.
“We understand children in care have very
poor outcomes,” said Mr Hinds, adding:
“Actually the truth is the outcomes for
children in need of a social worker are
almost as bad but there are five times as
many of them.
“We also know the effects of this sustain.
Overall if you’ve needed contact with a
social worker at any time since year 5, on
average you are going to score 20 grades
lower across eight GCSEs.
“We need to improve the visibility of this
group, both in schools and in the system
as a whole… and improve our knowledge
of what works to support and help
these children. We must not lower our
expectations for them – for these children
it is more important that they can do their
very best to make the most of their talents
when they’re at school.”
Schools will also receive guidance on how
to use the pupil premium – extra funding
given for disadvantaged children – most
effectively.
Undoubtedly, some of the schools
who will receive such guidance are
featured in this document. The pupil
premium has been a significant focus
for
TheParliamentary Review
in years
past, and so it is this year for many of the
representatives that follow.
Fifth of pupils don’t get their first-choice secondary school
Plans to support the most disadvantaged children
teaching must continue to reflect the law
“including the Equality Act, as it applies to
relationships, so that young people clearly
understand what the law allows and does
not allow.”
However, consultation around the
associated guidance appears to have
drawn the attention of religious activists
to what was being taught in schools in
Birmingham and elsewhere.
A focus for many of the early protests
was schools teaching the No Outsid ers
programme created at another
Birmingham school, Parkfield Community
School, by assistant headteacher Andrew
Moffat. It teaches positive values of
diversity, tolerance and acceptance as
part of a curriculum including same-sex
parents, race, religion and colour.
Mr Moffat – who was shortlisted for the
Global Teacher Prize in February – found
his own No Outsiders lessons suspended
in March while talks with parents took
place. His programme’s backers included
Ofsted’s Chief Inspector Amanda
Spielman, who said it was important that
children learned about families with two
mummies or two daddies.
Primary schools in
Birmingham were
sites of protest after
sex education classes
covered LGBT values
Under new measures,
children from
abusive households
will be able to get
placements in schools
much more quickly
Headteacher Georgina Nutton
The fully-equipped
art studio
Georgina Nutton became headteacher of Preston Park
in 2016 and has overseen a period of rapid change
resulting in a “good” Ofsted rating last year. With this
being her first headship, she looked to use the skills learnt in her
previous role to end a period of uncertainty for the school and
overcome the challenging and difficult circumstances she was
faced with. Georgina discusses the use of innovative teaching
methods and the new direction for Preston Park.
When I became headteacher in 2016 I was presented with an opportunity to take
Preston Park in a new direction, to restructure internally, refocus the way we teach
and reposition ourselves in the external marketplace. Today, we aim to provide a
world-class education and to ignite a love of learning that will last a lifetime.
We are on a rapid trajectory of improvement. Integral to this has been our strategic
framework that defines our six core values: resilience, responsibility, reflection,
reciprocity, respect and resourcefulness
.
This works
alongside a coherent vision, of
which students are at the forefront. Within this, the development of key strategic
priorities and associated performance indicators has enabled us to drive academic
achievement with the development of the whole child.
Accountability of leaders at all levels has been increased through a distributive
leadership model. In delivering against this framework we have fundamentally
changed the way we operate and the way we teach – raising expectations in every
aspect of school life. Children only have one opportunity for primary education and
we are determined to deliver the best start. A key priority for us has been to improve
academic achievement across the school and reverse the historic decline in results.
REPORT CARD
PRESTON PARK PRIMARY
SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Georgina Nutton
»Founded in 1932
»Based in Wembley, London
Borough of Brent
»Type of school: Maintained
primary
»No. of students: 732
»No. of staff: 96
Preston Park Primary
School
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
8| PRESTON PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL
Our children are now making great
progress with many accelerating learning
at rapid rates. From low entry points,
our children now leave in line with
national expectations and our operating
margin at the end of reception places
us significantly above average. Our
culture has been remapped and this
is a credit to our children, families,
dedicated team and community.
Effective teaching and learning
Personalising learning is at the heart
of our service and we passionately
believe in embracing diversity and
enabling every child to discover their
interests and talents. To achieve this,
we invest in professional teaching –
building our learning community on
skill and expertise with a focus on
what effective learning looks like. We
challenge ourselves and our children to
be innovative, to take risks and to drive
continuous improvement.
Moving learning from the concrete
to the abstract is complex and it
happens in different ways and at
different rates, which makes teaching
particularly intricate. We encourage
children to interrogate reality to gain
perspective – identifying patterns,
drawing on interrelations, triangulating
their knowledge and applying this
across disciplinary boundaries in a
coherentway.
In order to make excellence our norm,
we open up our classrooms and make
teaching practice available for peer
observation and critique. Collaboration
goes beyond superficial support – we
have strengthened our horizontal
accountability as a driver for improved
outcomes through developing the
notion of colleagues as critical friends.
The dialogue that occurs between
colleagues is deeply reflective on
practice and learning. Norms and
values are shared between colleagues
to crystallise the “Preston Park Way”.
An innovative curriculum
Creativity, critical thinking and
problem-solving are essential to
operating in the changing world of
work. We want every child to leave
us ready to take full advantage of all
opportunities open to them, and this
ambition is reflected in our curriculum
vision of STEAM – science, technology,
engineering, English, arts and maths.
Our curriculum map is progressive –
shaping learning through a thematic
approach that brings learning alive
with a real sense of purpose. Each
theme is underpinned by a core
text as a powerful platform to lever
creativity across all subjects and
capture the children’s imagination. Our
approach to learning allows time and
space for knowledge and skills to be
applied across the curriculum in many
different and unfamiliar contexts to
ensure depth and breadth of learning
andmastery.
We combine subjects through
a creative curriculum that is
complemented by a pioneering
specialist teaching model delivering
outstanding outcomes in art, music,
science and PE. Our curriculum
enables innovation, scholarship
and excellence, and runs parallel to
our hidden curriculum of learning
disciplines, emotion coaching, personal
development and wellbeing.
Debating at politics club
Personalising
learning is at
the heart of
our service
and we
passionately
believe in
embracing
diversity and
enabling every
child to
discover their
interests and
talents
9PRESTON PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
The impact of this has been felt in the
children’s behaviour. We previously
had one of the highest exclusion rates
in the borough, but now have one of
the lowest, while our behaviour for
learning is exceptional. I believe this
comes back to the ethos that we are
building. Adults provide challenge
and have fully embraced emotion
coaching, putting the emphasis
on the children to uphold our core
values. Pupil wellbeing is vital too
and we are expanding our mental
health offer and working closely with
Place2Be to support some of our most
vulnerablechildren.
Stakeholder Engagement
Underpinning our radical change
management programme is our
coherent communications and
stakeholder engagement strategy
and this is combined with robust
governance, which ensures
accountability school-wide. As a
community school, we must be a
place where our children love to
be, and Ofsted has noted that our
children are “relaxed and happy”.
Parents have commented that their
children really want to come to school
each day, and it is a pleasure to
observe their learning buzz around
the school.
We are committed to engaging
with all stakeholders to ensure our
school is at the heart of our local
community, while, eventually playing
a role nationally and internationally
in sharing best practice to improve
outcomes for children. Because of this,
our strategic drive and highly effective
pastoral support team, attendance has
dramatically improved. The children’s
attendance is strong and benchmarks
us above national for the first time in
adecade.
Principal risks and uncertainties
Despite our growth we face significant
challenges. Brexit continues to be an
uncertainty as we don’t know how
our withdrawal from the EU will affect
our community and pupil roll. Falling
roll impacts directly onto our budget
share and we have already had to
make £600,000 savings this year. We
continue to find new efficiencies as
we look to raise standards and this is
becoming increasingly challenging.
Our financial stability continues to
be a risk in the current climate and
with the board I am exploring ways
of ensuring our staffing structure is
the most efficient and effective in
meeting our pupils’ needs. We are on
a transformational journey, innovating
our curriculum to improve outcomes
in reading while enhancing our digital
engagement to further ensure we are
providing the best possible learning
experiences for our children.
We want every
child to leave us
ready to take full
advantage of all
opportunities
open to them,
and this
ambition is
reflected in our
curriculum vision
of STEAM
»THE PEER MODEL
We are fully inclusive with a strong commitment to
operational excellence and personalised learning. Our
lesson design is tailored through the PEER model – a
low-threshold, high-ceiling approach where all children
are challenged, and individual needs are met through
an enabling teaching sequence: prove, explain,
explore, reapply. The PEER model is based on the
fundamental principle that learning is a spiral process
and advocates the notion of mastery for all, whereby
all children master knowledge as their learning moves
up the spiral. The PEER model in
action
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
8| PRESTON PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL
Our children are now making great
progress with many accelerating learning
at rapid rates. From low entry points,
our children now leave in line with
national expectations and our operating
margin at the end of reception places
us significantly above average. Our
culture has been remapped and this
is a credit to our children, families,
dedicated team and community.
Effective teaching and learning
Personalising learning is at the heart
of our service and we passionately
believe in embracing diversity and
enabling every child to discover their
interests and talents. To achieve this,
we invest in professional teaching –
building our learning community on
skill and expertise with a focus on
what effective learning looks like. We
challenge ourselves and our children to
be innovative, to take risks and to drive
continuous improvement.
Moving learning from the concrete
to the abstract is complex and it
happens in different ways and at
different rates, which makes teaching
particularly intricate. We encourage
children to interrogate reality to gain
perspective – identifying patterns,
drawing on interrelations, triangulating
their knowledge and applying this
across disciplinary boundaries in a
coherentway.
In order to make excellence our norm,
we open up our classrooms and make
teaching practice available for peer
observation and critique. Collaboration
goes beyond superficial support – we
have strengthened our horizontal
accountability as a driver for improved
outcomes through developing the
notion of colleagues as critical friends.
The dialogue that occurs between
colleagues is deeply reflective on
practice and learning. Norms and
values are shared between colleagues
to crystallise the “Preston Park Way”.
An innovative curriculum
Creativity, critical thinking and
problem-solving are essential to
operating in the changing world of
work. We want every child to leave
us ready to take full advantage of all
opportunities open to them, and this
ambition is reflected in our curriculum
vision of STEAM – science, technology,
engineering, English, arts and maths.
Our curriculum map is progressive –
shaping learning through a thematic
approach that brings learning alive
with a real sense of purpose. Each
theme is underpinned by a core
text as a powerful platform to lever
creativity across all subjects and
capture the children’s imagination. Our
approach to learning allows time and
space for knowledge and skills to be
applied across the curriculum in many
different and unfamiliar contexts to
ensure depth and breadth of learning
andmastery.
We combine subjects through
a creative curriculum that is
complemented by a pioneering
specialist teaching model delivering
outstanding outcomes in art, music,
science and PE. Our curriculum
enables innovation, scholarship
and excellence, and runs parallel to
our hidden curriculum of learning
disciplines, emotion coaching, personal
development and wellbeing.
Debating at politics club
Personalising
learning is at
the heart of
our service
and we
passionately
believe in
embracing
diversity and
enabling every
child to
discover their
interests and
talents
9PRESTON PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
The impact of this has been felt in the
children’s behaviour. We previously
had one of the highest exclusion rates
in the borough, but now have one of
the lowest, while our behaviour for
learning is exceptional. I believe this
comes back to the ethos that we are
building. Adults provide challenge
and have fully embraced emotion
coaching, putting the emphasis
on the children to uphold our core
values. Pupil wellbeing is vital too
and we are expanding our mental
health offer and working closely with
Place2Be to support some of our most
vulnerablechildren.
Stakeholder Engagement
Underpinning our radical change
management programme is our
coherent communications and
stakeholder engagement strategy
and this is combined with robust
governance, which ensures
accountability school-wide. As a
community school, we must be a
place where our children love to
be, and Ofsted has noted that our
children are “relaxed and happy”.
Parents have commented that their
children really want to come to school
each day, and it is a pleasure to
observe their learning buzz around
the school.
We are committed to engaging
with all stakeholders to ensure our
school is at the heart of our local
community, while, eventually playing
a role nationally and internationally
in sharing best practice to improve
outcomes for children. Because of this,
our strategic drive and highly effective
pastoral support team, attendance has
dramatically improved. The children’s
attendance is strong and benchmarks
us above national for the first time in
adecade.
Principal risks and uncertainties
Despite our growth we face significant
challenges. Brexit continues to be an
uncertainty as we don’t know how
our withdrawal from the EU will affect
our community and pupil roll. Falling
roll impacts directly onto our budget
share and we have already had to
make £600,000 savings this year. We
continue to find new efficiencies as
we look to raise standards and this is
becoming increasingly challenging.
Our financial stability continues to
be a risk in the current climate and
with the board I am exploring ways
of ensuring our staffing structure is
the most efficient and effective in
meeting our pupils’ needs. We are on
a transformational journey, innovating
our curriculum to improve outcomes
in reading while enhancing our digital
engagement to further ensure we are
providing the best possible learning
experiences for our children.
We want every
child to leave us
ready to take full
advantage of all
opportunities
open to them,
and this
ambition is
reflected in our
curriculum vision
of STEAM
»THE PEER MODEL
We are fully inclusive with a strong commitment to
operational excellence and personalised learning. Our
lesson design is tailored through the PEER model – a
low-threshold, high-ceiling approach where all children
are challenged, and individual needs are met through
an enabling teaching sequence: prove, explain,
explore, reapply. The PEER model is based on the
fundamental principle that learning is a spiral process
and advocates the notion of mastery for all, whereby
all children master knowledge as their learning moves
up the spiral. The PEER model in
action

www.prestonparkschool.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Preston Park Primary School. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development