Queensbridge Primary School

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Queensbridge Primary School's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Queensbridge Primary School is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.queensbridge.hackney.sch.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL
Headteacher Sarah Bailey OBE
Happy children make
good learners
Queensbridge Primary is an “outstanding” Ofsted rated
school, based in Hackney, London. It is a National
Teaching School “Future Stars” and headteacher Sarah
Bailey OBE is a National Leader of Education. It does much
outreach work for the DfE in Norfolk, Medway and other
locations in and out of London. It focuses on providing a high-
quality learning environment for pupils from a wide range of
backgrounds and works with families to ensure that all children
across the diverse community achieve their potential and place
high expectations on their future. Sarah tells
The Parliamentary
Review
about the highly inclusive nature of the school and the
need for a uniquely designed curriculum to achieve success.
Thanks to the dedicated, hard work of our staff, Queensbridge is a safe, welcoming
and nurturing school that offers all of our children a powerful sense of belonging.
We are a two and three form entry school and we pride ourselves that we
know each and every child inside out. We do our best to help each child find
their strengths and talents so that they will flourish, be challenged and become
independent learners from whatever their starting points may be.
We aim to be holistic, innovative, aspirational and consistent in our approach,
constantly reflecting on our practice and using new techniques from current
research, particularly from the Education Endowment Foundation, to enhance
learning opportunities. We have several specialist leaders of education on our staff
team. Teachers aim to make learning creative, stimulating, inclusive and fun with
REPORT CARD
QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY
SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Sarah Bailey OBE
»Based in the London Borough
of Hackney
»Type of school: Primary, with
children’s centre and teaching
school
»No. of students: 508 in
the school and 105 in the
children’s centre
»No. of staff: 88 in the school
and 28 in the children’s centre
Queensbridge Primary
School
17QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
lots of challenge, setting ambitious
goals for the future. Children are
offered a vast range of opportunities
to light the spark of their learning,
which provides them with the skills
and tools they need for the future.
Supporting complex needs
Based in Hackney in north London,
the school serves a diverse community
and welcomes children with a range
of needs and requirements. 37 per
cent of children receive pupil premium
and 54 different languages are spoken
on-site. Twenty-five per cent of our
children have SEND with tailored,
specialist provision, while six per
cent have EHCPs and 17 have ASD.
All of the children with additional
EHCPs without autism are complex,
with either a genetic disorder, global
delay, Down’s syndrome, Moebius
syndrome, physical disability or
hearingimpairment.
We are not a specialist unit, but we
hope to open an autism resource
provision that will provide support
within the local community, additional
specialist provision and places and
respite at weekends. We are also
currently taking part in a SEND peer
review in the east of England and
northeast London as part of our
research as a National Teaching School.
There is vulnerability in our school
population, with a number of families
facing issues relating to substance
misuse, housing and gang conflict in
the community. As a result, we have
significant responsibility to engage in
restorative behaviour practices and
deliver a values-based curriculum that
can help our children aspire for more
in the future. With our restorative
practice, we have a successful
programme of peer mediation enabling
children to connect, take ownership
and deal with conflict in and outside
school. It has also had a positive
impact in reducing exclusions over
time. Wehave a close relationship with
the local police and prison service and
they help us provide the necessary level
of pastoral care for children from all
kinds of backgrounds. In addition, we
have a strong re-engagement focused
pastoral team that looks to address
issues facing children with a focus on
mindfulness and conflict resolution.
We have been part of many published
case studies for restorative practices.
We aim to share this practice in local
secondary transition as some of our
children have moved from this holistic,
inclusive and nurturing environment
and sadly have had early exclusions in
their secondary schools.
Achieving and measuring
desired outcomes
We have designed a unique curriculum
over several years which is constantly
being reviewed to ensure that it
best meets the needs of our school
population. As a staff body we place a
huge importance on connecting with
children and their families, talking to
them and understanding their needs,
whether they be educational or not.
This small steps SMART learning is
a crucial tool when dealing with
vulnerable young people and their
circumstances so that everyone can see
their progress made, however small it
may be. Implementing
individualised, tailored
teaching programmes
We have
designed a
unique
curriculum
over several
years which is
constantly
being reviewed
to ensure that
it best meets
the needs of
our school
population
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
16 | QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL
Headteacher Sarah Bailey OBE
Happy children make
good learners
Queensbridge Primary is an “outstanding” Ofsted rated
school, based in Hackney, London. It is a National
Teaching School “Future Stars” and headteacher Sarah
Bailey OBE is a National Leader of Education. It does much
outreach work for the DfE in Norfolk, Medway and other
locations in and out of London. It focuses on providing a high-
quality learning environment for pupils from a wide range of
backgrounds and works with families to ensure that all children
across the diverse community achieve their potential and place
high expectations on their future. Sarah tells
The Parliamentary
Review
about the highly inclusive nature of the school and the
need for a uniquely designed curriculum to achieve success.
Thanks to the dedicated, hard work of our staff, Queensbridge is a safe, welcoming
and nurturing school that offers all of our children a powerful sense of belonging.
We are a two and three form entry school and we pride ourselves that we
know each and every child inside out. We do our best to help each child find
their strengths and talents so that they will flourish, be challenged and become
independent learners from whatever their starting points may be.
We aim to be holistic, innovative, aspirational and consistent in our approach,
constantly reflecting on our practice and using new techniques from current
research, particularly from the Education Endowment Foundation, to enhance
learning opportunities. We have several specialist leaders of education on our staff
team. Teachers aim to make learning creative, stimulating, inclusive and fun with
REPORT CARD
QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY
SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Sarah Bailey OBE
»Based in the London Borough
of Hackney
»Type of school: Primary, with
children’s centre and teaching
school
»No. of students: 508 in
the school and 105 in the
children’s centre
»No. of staff: 88 in the school
and 28 in the children’s centre
Queensbridge Primary
School
17QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
lots of challenge, setting ambitious
goals for the future. Children are
offered a vast range of opportunities
to light the spark of their learning,
which provides them with the skills
and tools they need for the future.
Supporting complex needs
Based in Hackney in north London,
the school serves a diverse community
and welcomes children with a range
of needs and requirements. 37 per
cent of children receive pupil premium
and 54 different languages are spoken
on-site. Twenty-five per cent of our
children have SEND with tailored,
specialist provision, while six per
cent have EHCPs and 17 have ASD.
All of the children with additional
EHCPs without autism are complex,
with either a genetic disorder, global
delay, Down’s syndrome, Moebius
syndrome, physical disability or
hearingimpairment.
We are not a specialist unit, but we
hope to open an autism resource
provision that will provide support
within the local community, additional
specialist provision and places and
respite at weekends. We are also
currently taking part in a SEND peer
review in the east of England and
northeast London as part of our
research as a National Teaching School.
There is vulnerability in our school
population, with a number of families
facing issues relating to substance
misuse, housing and gang conflict in
the community. As a result, we have
significant responsibility to engage in
restorative behaviour practices and
deliver a values-based curriculum that
can help our children aspire for more
in the future. With our restorative
practice, we have a successful
programme of peer mediation enabling
children to connect, take ownership
and deal with conflict in and outside
school. It has also had a positive
impact in reducing exclusions over
time. Wehave a close relationship with
the local police and prison service and
they help us provide the necessary level
of pastoral care for children from all
kinds of backgrounds. In addition, we
have a strong re-engagement focused
pastoral team that looks to address
issues facing children with a focus on
mindfulness and conflict resolution.
We have been part of many published
case studies for restorative practices.
We aim to share this practice in local
secondary transition as some of our
children have moved from this holistic,
inclusive and nurturing environment
and sadly have had early exclusions in
their secondary schools.
Achieving and measuring
desired outcomes
We have designed a unique curriculum
over several years which is constantly
being reviewed to ensure that it
best meets the needs of our school
population. As a staff body we place a
huge importance on connecting with
children and their families, talking to
them and understanding their needs,
whether they be educational or not.
This small steps SMART learning is
a crucial tool when dealing with
vulnerable young people and their
circumstances so that everyone can see
their progress made, however small it
may be. Implementing
individualised, tailored
teaching programmes
We have
designed a
unique
curriculum
over several
years which is
constantly
being reviewed
to ensure that
it best meets
the needs of
our school
population
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | QUEENSBRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL
In the classroom, teachers take care to
make learning meaningful and cross
curricular, building on and re-visiting
vital skills as we want subjects to appear
relevant to pupils’ life and future. This
is embedded by revisiting key events
and reframing them in a chronological
order, allowing the children to gauge
how the lesson content fits into the
bigger picture. Context is so important
as a term like king or queen may appear
to be an everyday term, but its precise
meaning shifts depending on the period
of history in which it is being applied,
and in some cases a new word, like
emperor for example, is needed.
Reading, writing and maths have a
clear focus throughout our provision
and this is a process that begins at
nursery and reception stage. We
want our children to develop a rich
understanding of language and despite
many children arriving below the
expected level, we provide a language
Launch Pad that allows them to bridge
the gap quickly. This process involves
targeted intervention and access to
an array of suitable, quality literature.
We have built a love of reading across
the school and this has seen great
improvements in our literacy outcomes.
The school has embarked on a Dialogic
Talk project to enrich vocabulary, build
confidence and model sentence stems
particularly for pupil premium and EAL
children inmaths.
We carefully plan how we deliver
our curriculum areas over time and
focus on the skills we want children
to build on. We sequence lessons and
aim to build on prior learning through
repetition and revisiting key concepts
in a new way that deepens knowledge
over time. All our teachers have
adapted their formative and summative
assessment to take this into account
and the progress has been tangible.
We also track soft data for social and
emotional need.
Enrichment activities
Our children have embraced the
innovative programmes on offer. We
run whole class chess, which helps
develop negotiation skills, patience,
problem solving and strategy, while also
teaching children how to lose gracefully.
We have won the London Chess Classic
Champion League title four times in
a row. We place a great emphasis on
singing, music and performing arts and
have been accredited with the Arts Mark
Platinum. We also have well established
STEAM work going on.
Our Forest School has also been crucial
in allowing children to build vocabulary
via first-hand experiences, with a
particular emphasis on pupil premium
children. It is engaging and inclusive
outdoor learning. The children thrive
and prosper, challenging themselves
and each other. It encourages managed
risk taking, adventure and language
skills and it offers children opportunities
they may not get outside school. Our
curriculum is built on our four values:
respect, perseverance, collaboration
and possibilities. We teach children
to celebrate diversity and uniqueness.
We have focus weeks on ASD and
the LGBT community and these have
a powerful and important impact
on how our children’ understand
the world they live in. Black history
permeates the curriculum throughout
the year. Our children leave us as well-
rounded young people and this is one
of our greatest signs of success.
Our Forest
School has also
been crucial in
allowing
children to
build
vocabulary via
first-hand
experiences,
with a
particular
emphasis on
pupil premium
children
Pupil voice and feedback
are crucial
19AINSLIE WOOD PRIMARY SCHOOL |
PRIMARY EDUCATION
Headteacher Kerry Scott
Exploring the world outside of school is a
key factor in the children’s development
Ainslie Wood Primary is a larger than the national average
school with an average free school meal profile – but
this wouldn’t help to explain the turbulent history that
it has experienced in the 22 years since it was first opened. The
historic results show that it was never able to achieve better
than middling outcomes for its pupils, but this changed in 2013
when Kerry Scott became the headteacher. She explains how
she managed to achieve such dramatic improvement.
When I arrived as headteacher in September 2013, the results were so low that the
school was nationally ranked in the bottom one per cent for both attainment and
for progress – despite being graded “good” by Ofsted. Within a few months of
my arrival the necessary steps to academise the school were being taken, without
my prior consultation. Luckily however, we were given a year to meet the floor
attainment standard, which dictated that 65 per cent of students needed to meet
the old Level 4 standard by the end of year 6.
In order to make a big impact, we needed to take a different approach. The main drivers
for change were the creation of a clear vision which we then worked tirelessly towards,
and the potentially controversial decision to split the teaching from thelearning.
Vision
In order to work towards a new goal, we needed a new vision: one which would
eradicate the low expectations that had previously permeated the school. Our
new vision set us on the path to becoming a school which would “Inspire Active
Learning and Exceed Expectations”.
REPORT CARD
AINSLIE WOOD PRIMARY
SCHOOL
»Headteacher: Kerry Scott
»Founded in 1996
»Located in Chingford, London
Borough of Waltham Forest
»Type of school: Two-form
entry primary with nursery
»Number of pupils: 480
»The school motto is “Inspiring
Active Learning and Exceeding
Expectations”
»Our current goal is
“Inspirational Leaders –
Aspirational Learners”
»www.ainsliewood.co.uk
Ainslie Wood Primary
School

www.queensbridge.hackney.sch.uk

This article was sponsored by Queensbridge Primary School. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development