Rosehill Theatre

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Rosehill Theatre's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Rosehill Theatre is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.rosehilltheatre.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | ROSEHILL THEATRE
Director and Trustee
RichardElder
Celebrating our 60th
anniversary in September
First established in 1959, Rosehill has had a long and
illustrious history, hosting artists and performers ranging
from Benjamin Britten to a young David Bowie. Originally
focusing on performances of classical music, they have since
broadened their work and undertaken a building redevelopment
which has brought the theatre back to its former glory
while adding facilities including, significantly, a restaurant.
Committed to providing a level and type of performance
usually only available in cities, they focus on social impact and
are celebrating their 60th anniversary in September. Director
Richard Elder tells
The Parliamentary Review
more.
The theatre was created in 1959 by Nicholas Sekers, a patron of the arts and a
fabric designer and manufacturer. Designed by Oliver Messel, a distinguished
stage designer of the time, the theatre began to fade in the 1970s with Nicholas’
death. Rosehill began a determined redevelopment plan in 2006, supported by
government regeneration funding, including through the nuclear industry (the
nuclear site Sellafield is nearby) and its socioeconomic investment programmes.
I joined in 2008 and quickly began to upgrade the artistic programme and develop
the business plan and our resources. The building works began in 2015 and
Rosehill reopened in 2017. These works included the creation of a restaurant
through a trading company, Rosehill Theatre Enterprises. The activities of this
company have a joint purpose: generating much-needed income for high-quality
performances and participatory programmes, and promoting social impact by
employing young people from the local catering school and elsewhere, alongside
providing apprenticeships in a range of disciplines.
FACTS ABOUT
ROSEHILL THEATRE
»Director and Trustee:
RichardElder
»Established in 1959
»Based near Whitehaven,
Cumbria
»Services: Arts, entertainment
and hospitality
»No. of employees: 25
Rosehill Theatre
41ROSEHILL THEATRE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
During the redevelopment, we restored
the original design and craftsmanship
in the auditorium, the focal point of
Oliver Messel’s work, while adding
greatly to the front-of-house and
backstage facilities, including access
for all public, performers and members
of staff.
It was a priority to keep the auditorium
as it was. The new building looks
towards Scotland over the Irish Sea
from a wonderful vantage point,
with gorgeous sunsets. This view has
become one of the attractions of
the new restaurant situated on the
top floor, in addition, of course, to
thefood.
Broadening our impact
While the original purpose of the
theatre was the promotion of classical
music and dramatic arts, we have
broadened our approach to include
participatory activity and social impact,
and now our work with children
and young people is a key activity.
The programme is more diverse and
relevant to contemporary issues, and
a broader constituency with high-
quality performances remaining an
essentialpart.
Some time before the redevelopment,
our annual turnover was approximately
£250,000; our projected turnover for
2019/20 is closer to £1 million. The
economic impact of the redevelopment
has been considerable, therefore,
and is intended to be increasingly so.
Employment numbers have increased
from around six to 25 as a result of our
new operations.
We have various performing and
producing partners, including high-
profile national organisations – for
example, the National Youth Choirs
of Great Britain, English Touring
Opera, Cardboard Citizens and
Mahogany Opera. We are a National
Portfolio Organisation of Arts Council
England, receiving annual funding.
The redevelopment was achieved with
key significant investment from the
Nuclear Decommissioning Authority,
Britain’s Energy Coast, Copeland
Community Fund and the Coastal
Communities Fund. We also received
significant investment from national
trusts and foundations including the
Garfield Weston Foundation, Linbury
Trust, J. Paul Getty Jr Charitable Trust,
WREN, Savoy Educational Trust and
the National Grid. Our local and county
councils provided further financial
support as did a great many individuals
with much-needed smaller and larger
donations. This constituted wonderfully
varied investment for which we are
most appreciative.
Attracting these investors from
all over the country, and securing
support from those dedicated to the
arts including from the south east,
was a real achievement. We have
sought to strike a balance between
local business and national funding,
creating diverse income streams.
Apprentice chef Lola
preparing afternoon tea
While the
original purpose
of the theatre
was the
promotion of
classical music
and dramatic
arts, we have
broadened our
approach to
include
participatory
activity and
social impact
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | ROSEHILL THEATRE
Director and Trustee
RichardElder
Celebrating our 60th
anniversary in September
First established in 1959, Rosehill has had a long and
illustrious history, hosting artists and performers ranging
from Benjamin Britten to a young David Bowie. Originally
focusing on performances of classical music, they have since
broadened their work and undertaken a building redevelopment
which has brought the theatre back to its former glory
while adding facilities including, significantly, a restaurant.
Committed to providing a level and type of performance
usually only available in cities, they focus on social impact and
are celebrating their 60th anniversary in September. Director
Richard Elder tells
The Parliamentary Review
more.
The theatre was created in 1959 by Nicholas Sekers, a patron of the arts and a
fabric designer and manufacturer. Designed by Oliver Messel, a distinguished
stage designer of the time, the theatre began to fade in the 1970s with Nicholas’
death. Rosehill began a determined redevelopment plan in 2006, supported by
government regeneration funding, including through the nuclear industry (the
nuclear site Sellafield is nearby) and its socioeconomic investment programmes.
I joined in 2008 and quickly began to upgrade the artistic programme and develop
the business plan and our resources. The building works began in 2015 and
Rosehill reopened in 2017. These works included the creation of a restaurant
through a trading company, Rosehill Theatre Enterprises. The activities of this
company have a joint purpose: generating much-needed income for high-quality
performances and participatory programmes, and promoting social impact by
employing young people from the local catering school and elsewhere, alongside
providing apprenticeships in a range of disciplines.
FACTS ABOUT
ROSEHILL THEATRE
»Director and Trustee:
RichardElder
»Established in 1959
»Based near Whitehaven,
Cumbria
»Services: Arts, entertainment
and hospitality
»No. of employees: 25
Rosehill Theatre
41ROSEHILL THEATRE |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
During the redevelopment, we restored
the original design and craftsmanship
in the auditorium, the focal point of
Oliver Messel’s work, while adding
greatly to the front-of-house and
backstage facilities, including access
for all public, performers and members
of staff.
It was a priority to keep the auditorium
as it was. The new building looks
towards Scotland over the Irish Sea
from a wonderful vantage point,
with gorgeous sunsets. This view has
become one of the attractions of
the new restaurant situated on the
top floor, in addition, of course, to
thefood.
Broadening our impact
While the original purpose of the
theatre was the promotion of classical
music and dramatic arts, we have
broadened our approach to include
participatory activity and social impact,
and now our work with children
and young people is a key activity.
The programme is more diverse and
relevant to contemporary issues, and
a broader constituency with high-
quality performances remaining an
essentialpart.
Some time before the redevelopment,
our annual turnover was approximately
£250,000; our projected turnover for
2019/20 is closer to £1 million. The
economic impact of the redevelopment
has been considerable, therefore,
and is intended to be increasingly so.
Employment numbers have increased
from around six to 25 as a result of our
new operations.
We have various performing and
producing partners, including high-
profile national organisations – for
example, the National Youth Choirs
of Great Britain, English Touring
Opera, Cardboard Citizens and
Mahogany Opera. We are a National
Portfolio Organisation of Arts Council
England, receiving annual funding.
The redevelopment was achieved with
key significant investment from the
Nuclear Decommissioning Authority,
Britain’s Energy Coast, Copeland
Community Fund and the Coastal
Communities Fund. We also received
significant investment from national
trusts and foundations including the
Garfield Weston Foundation, Linbury
Trust, J. Paul Getty Jr Charitable Trust,
WREN, Savoy Educational Trust and
the National Grid. Our local and county
councils provided further financial
support as did a great many individuals
with much-needed smaller and larger
donations. This constituted wonderfully
varied investment for which we are
most appreciative.
Attracting these investors from
all over the country, and securing
support from those dedicated to the
arts including from the south east,
was a real achievement. We have
sought to strike a balance between
local business and national funding,
creating diverse income streams.
Apprentice chef Lola
preparing afternoon tea
While the
original purpose
of the theatre
was the
promotion of
classical music
and dramatic
arts, we have
broadened our
approach to
include
participatory
activity and
social impact
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
42 | ROSEHILL THEATRE
Our corporate investment is driven
by Sellafield, led by its Corporate
Director Andy Smith, who is a trustee
of Rosehill Arts Trust and chairs its
subsidiary Rosehill Theatre Enterprises.
In this, Rosehill’s 60th year, we
plan to launch a corporate revenue
funding programme, building on the
capital project and financial support,
led by the significant support of
Sellafield. We are delighted that
ADAPT, a consortium of organisations
supporting the decommissioning of
Sellafield, is at the vanguard of this
revenue support.
A new Chair of Rosehill Arts Trust,
John Clarke, joined us in early
2018, bringing with him significant
business interests and support
following a career leading the Nuclear
Decommissioning Authority. It goes
without saying that both John and
Andy enjoy the arts very much and
are committed to the impact they can
have on the communities in which
people live and work. Likewise, we
are supported by an experienced and
committed group of trustees, directors
and staff team.
Enhancing the local area
The area in which Rosehill operates,
West Cumbria, is one of stark contrasts.
On the one hand average earnings are
some of the highest in the UK and on
the other there are significant economic
and social challenges. Rosehill’s
underlying purpose is to work alongside,
and in partnership with, community-
based and national stakeholders to
deliver a programme of performance
and participatory work that is relevant
and of interest and value within this
starkly contrasting demographic.
This takes place at Rosehill itself and
through Rosehill on the Road, taking
our work into community-based
venues, and through our Taking Part
programme, delivering participatory
work mainly for youngpeople.
High-quality performances of different
sorts, many of a national and some of
an international level, is a prerequisite
and increasingly this sits alongside
social impact as a key driver. Blending
the two is both our new challenge
andopportunity.
While making the performance
programme diverse is increasingly
important, it is no less important to
provide experiences for people to try
out different musical and theatrical
experiences not generally available
in such a rural setting. The food we
serve is available on a stand-alone basis
but it is the fusion of this and artistic
programming that provides a more
rounded experience to the benefit of
both. Providing these, separately and
together, at prices that are intended
to be as accessible as possible within
the contrasting demographic we serve,
isimportant.
We are not there yet and do not get
everything just as we would like first
time round, of course, but we are on
an important journey, with further
building plans in the making. Wherever
you are, please come and see what
you think, and let usknow.
The economic
impact of the
redevelopment
has been
considerable
and is
intended to be
increasingly so.
Employment
numbers have
increased from
six to 25
Lung Theatre’s verbatim
production
Who Cares,
addressing the issues of
young carers, at Rosehill
in June 2019
43COMPTON VERNEY ART GALLERY & PARK |
DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA & SPORT
Director Julie Finch
Compton Verney Art Gallery
and Park
Based in Warwickshire, Compton Verney Art Gallery and
Park is an independent charitable trust with six permanent
collections, special exhibitions and an extensive programme
of events. Fully established in 2004, the art gallery and landscape
are the setting for works of art, a wildflower meadow, and for an
array of activities and events such as art courses and workshops,
its Dementia Café, tai chi classes, nature walks, foraging
expeditions, a forest school and in 2019, the BBC’s
Antiques
Roadshow
. Such events, indoors and outside, are programmed
to appeal to people from all ages and backgrounds, while
respecting the integrity of the landscape design and the delicate
ecosystem. Director Julie Finch tells the
Review
more.
You approach the art galleries at Compton Verney by crossing a lake over a bridge
flanked by sphinxes. You are already within our largest work of art, the park
commissioned from Lancelot “Capability” Brown in 1768. It has been described
as “a precise composition that is magically beautiful”. It is truly an inspiring place,
where art and landscape meet.
The vision and the hope
The Compton Verney estate, comprising a derelict, Grade I listed house and 120
acres of land, was purchased by Sir Peter Moores in 1993, with the intention
of creating a setting for experiencing art that would attract people who do not
normally visit museums or galleries. The vision was to create a place to explore
and enjoy, with no barriers deriving from class, education or opportunity.
FACTS ABOUT
COMPTON VERNEY ARTGALLERY
& PARK
»Director: Julie Finch
»Fully established in 2004
»Located in Compton Verney,
Warwickshire
»Services: Art gallery and
parkland
»No. of employees: 40, with
63 seasonal staff and 111
volunteers
»The landscape is a designated
wildlife site in Warwickshire
with more than 150 species
of birds, some of them rare in
the UK
»The lake, with its carp and
pike, now has otters living
along its bank
»www.comptonverney.org.uk
Compton Verney
ArtGallery & Park

www.rosehilltheatre.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Rosehill Theatre. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster