Saab UK

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Saab UK's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Saab UK is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett, MP
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles, MP

www.saab.com/uk

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Review of the Year
16 | REVIEW OF THE YEAR
and entrepreneurs as well as
financial and professional services,
the Industrial Infrastructure and
Manufacturing Business Council was
comprised of representatives from the
automotive, aerospace, energy and
manufacturingsectors.
The first meeting was hosted by Mrs
May in January 2019, where she was
joined by Greg Clark, the former
business secretary, and Sir Mark
Sedwill, the head of the civil service.
After providing an update on Brexit,
the council discussed opportunities and
policy issues that were critical to the
represented business sectors, as well as
how productivity and competitiveness
could be improved.
Largely a provisional meeting to
establish areas of discussion, particular
highlights included skills and training,
both in education and the workplace,
and the role of technology in
improving productivity, infrastructure
andinvestment.
The second meeting, hosted just days
before the prime minister stepped
down in July 2019, was somewhat
more substantial; it focussed in
greater detail on British industry’s
impact on the environment, as
well as the growing importance of
smartconstruction.
Representatives from the council
also advised that the apprenticeship
levy was failing to be flexible and
transparent enough to support players
in British industry. The government
reported that Mrs May “welcomed”
these proposals, and emphasised the
importance of the levy.
One of the other significant points of
discussion was green mobility. The
council proposed what it described as
a “transition council” alongside plans
to seek out future opportunities for
alternative fuels.
Mrs May then went on to discuss the
“tangible economic opportunities” for
UK business in the progress of carbon
capture storage and how the technology
would be vital in the coming years to
meet her net-zero emission target of
2050 announced just weeks earlier.
She pledged that the government would
continue to work closely with the council
and agreed that politics and business
alike needed to “move at greater pace
and scale” to realise such a target.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to
print, there has been no confirmation
that the council or any of its
counterparts from across industry will
continue to meet, or if they will still be
hosted twice a year by Boris Johnson,
the new prime minister.
The Council’s second
meeting focused on
British industry’s impact
on the environment
17SAAB UK |
AEROSPACE, DEFENCE & SECURITY
Head of Saab UK AndrewWalton
Gripen E test flight over the
Swedish archipelago
Saab’s journey as a global, full-spectrum defence and security
company started in 1937 when it was established to build
fighter aircraft for the Swedish Air Force. Since then, it
has built more than 3,200 fighter aircraft and over 1,300 other
types of aircraft. In 2017, Gripen E, the latest version of the
highly successful fighter family, took to the air and, earlier this
year, Sweden, and with it Saab, announced its partnership with
Britain’s Future Combat Air System programme. Saab’s journey
has brought expansion and today it is a world leader in airborne,
ground-based and naval radars, in addition to submarine
and surface vessel capabilities. It also develops leading-edge
electronic warfare capabilities for airborne, naval and land-based
operations, as well as missiles and infantry support weapons.
Head of Saab UK, Andrew Walton, explains how Saab’s broad
range of capabilities, products and expertise makes the company
a natural partner for UK defence.
Of course, many remember us for Saab cars – a highly successful spin-off that we
divested in the 1990s but that are no longer made. So far, so normal; what makes
us think we are different and what are our plans in the UK?
For a start, we truly believe in investing for the future if we are to maintain a
leading market position. We invest around 25 per cent of our annual turnover
in internal research and development. Putting this into context, other major
European defence companies spend around eight or nine per cent. To ensure this
FACTS ABOUT
SAAB UK
»Head of Saab UK:
AndrewWalton
»Founded in 1937
»Based in London
»Services: Defence and security
»No. of global employees:
17,000
Saab UK
and entrepreneurs as well as
financial and professional services,
the Industrial Infrastructure and
Manufacturing Business Council was
comprised of representatives from the
automotive, aerospace, energy and
manufacturingsectors.
The first meeting was hosted by Mrs
May in January 2019, where she was
joined by Greg Clark, the former
business secretary, and Sir Mark
Sedwill, the head of the civil service.
After providing an update on Brexit,
the council discussed opportunities and
policy issues that were critical to the
represented business sectors, as well as
how productivity and competitiveness
could be improved.
Largely a provisional meeting to
establish areas of discussion, particular
highlights included skills and training,
both in education and the workplace,
and the role of technology in
improving productivity, infrastructure
andinvestment.
The second meeting, hosted just days
before the prime minister stepped
down in July 2019, was somewhat
more substantial; it focussed in
greater detail on British industry’s
impact on the environment, as
well as the growing importance of
smartconstruction.
Representatives from the council
also advised that the apprenticeship
levy was failing to be flexible and
transparent enough to support players
in British industry. The government
reported that Mrs May “welcomed”
these proposals, and emphasised the
importance of the levy.
One of the other significant points of
discussion was green mobility. The
council proposed what it described as
a “transition council” alongside plans
to seek out future opportunities for
alternative fuels.
Mrs May then went on to discuss the
“tangible economic opportunities” for
UK business in the progress of carbon
capture storage and how the technology
would be vital in the coming years to
meet her net-zero emission target of
2050 announced just weeks earlier.
She pledged that the government would
continue to work closely with the council
and agreed that politics and business
alike needed to “move at greater pace
and scale” to realise such a target.
As
The Parliamentary Review
goes to
print, there has been no confirmation
that the council or any of its
counterparts from across industry will
continue to meet, or if they will still be
hosted twice a year by Boris Johnson,
the new prime minister.
The Council’s second
meeting focused on
British industry’s impact
on the environment
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | SAAB UK
investment is used wisely, we maintain
a small army of theoretical physicists,
mathematicians, PhD graduates and
engineers to keep us close to, if not at,
the leading edge of technology in such
areas as sensors, electronic warfare
and weapons. We have, of course, also
been investing in artificial intelligence,
automation, cyber resilience, big data
and so forth, as well as software
development, novel materials and
computing power.
This level of investment is something
we initiated during the Cold War
when Sweden operated conscript
armed forces – they are now fully
professional, of course. As a result,
everything we developed had to
be simple to operate and simple to
maintain; a philosophy we retain to
this day. As an example, our Erieye
active electronic steered array airborne
surveillance radars have no moving
parts and are air-cooled; together
with the use of gallium nitride and
advanced algorithms, they are second
to none at detecting very small
objects at very long ranges and in all
conditions – and they have exceptional
levels of availability.
International presence
For many years, we based our
operations in Sweden and exported to
customers around the world. In 2013,
however, we expanded our approach
to be more locally based in selected
countries. We had always had offices
in more than 100 countries, but we
are now building our operations in
a few select countries, including the
UK. In fact, we have been operating
in the UK for some 40 years, providing
electronic warfare capabilities to the
Royal Air Force, and support weapons,
smart camouflage and dismounted
infantry training to the British Army.
Our Giraffe and Arthur radars have
seen service on operations with British
forces and are credited with saving
the lives of British troops. We are now
growing through a combination of
organic and non-organic investment
and by investing in the UK’s very
strong scientific, technological,
engineering and mathematical skills.
Earlier this year, we opened the Saab
Innovation Hub where, working with
Imperial College, London, we are
investing some of our 25 per cent of
annual turnover in defence-related
research and development, generating
UK intellectual property for both the
UK home and export markets. We
are working not only with Imperial
scientists but also with other leading
British universities, with Ministry of
Defence scientific establishments and
with technology partners across the
United Kingdom.
We are also attracted by the UK’s well-
regulated but open defence market
and by the cross-Whitehall approach
to defence export support. The UK’s
historical, cultural, economic and
trade links to almost all corners of the
The UK is the largest
operator of Saab’s
Giraffe AMB radars in
the world
We have been
investing in
artificial
intelligence,
automation,
cyber resilience,
big data and so
forth, as well
as software
development,
novel materials
and computing
power
19SAAB UK |
AEROSPACE, DEFENCE & SECURITY
globe also make this a natural home
for our global export operations and
we are therefore growing our design,
development and manufacturing base
here. We have long believed it essential
that any defence investment, whether
by industry or government, should
reflect positively on nationalprosperity.
As an example, over one third of the
content of our Gripen fighter aircraft is
sourced from British companies and we
wanted to know what impact that had
on the British economy. We therefore
commissioned an independent study
by one of the big four professional
services firms in possession of a
certified model of the economy to
run the numbers for us. They showed
that over a ten-year period the direct,
indirect and induced benefits of the UK
supply chain amount to two to three
billion pounds and five to six thousand
jobs. We believe that this level of
analysis should be done on all our
major programmes and we are pleased
to be in discussion with the Ministry of
Defence on this subject. We are proud
that our UK supply chain is made up
of nearly 1,000 companies, 99 per
cent of which are small to medium
sizedenterprises.
Growing closer relationships
As further evidence of our commitment
to inward investment in the UK, we
were delighted to be able to announce
at this year’s Royal International Air
Tattoo, our part in the Anglo-Swedish
shared vision for future combat air. The
“Tempest” fighter system will provide
the Royal Air Force and others with the
next-generation fighter system, fielding
the most advanced technologies yet
seen – a testament to the close and
growing relationship between Sweden
and the UK and one that we intend to
foster carefully over the coming years.
From fighter production for Sweden
in the 1930s, through rapid growth
and investment across the defence
spectrum, to development of the
world’s most sophisticated fighter
system with the UK in 2019, the Saab
journey has been one of innovation,
imagination and invention. We look
forward now to further growth and
an even closer relationship with the
people most important to us – the
men and women who operate
our equipment on behalf of those
responsible for securing our free dom.
The Saab
journey has
been one of
innovation,
imagination
and invention
The Carl-Gustaf M4
multi-role launcher is a
worldwide success
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
18 | SAAB UK
investment is used wisely, we maintain
a small army of theoretical physicists,
mathematicians, PhD graduates and
engineers to keep us close to, if not at,
the leading edge of technology in such
areas as sensors, electronic warfare
and weapons. We have, of course, also
been investing in artificial intelligence,
automation, cyber resilience, big data
and so forth, as well as software
development, novel materials and
computing power.
This level of investment is something
we initiated during the Cold War
when Sweden operated conscript
armed forces – they are now fully
professional, of course. As a result,
everything we developed had to
be simple to operate and simple to
maintain; a philosophy we retain to
this day. As an example, our Erieye
active electronic steered array airborne
surveillance radars have no moving
parts and are air-cooled; together
with the use of gallium nitride and
advanced algorithms, they are second
to none at detecting very small
objects at very long ranges and in all
conditions – and they have exceptional
levels of availability.
International presence
For many years, we based our
operations in Sweden and exported to
customers around the world. In 2013,
however, we expanded our approach
to be more locally based in selected
countries. We had always had offices
in more than 100 countries, but we
are now building our operations in
a few select countries, including the
UK. In fact, we have been operating
in the UK for some 40 years, providing
electronic warfare capabilities to the
Royal Air Force, and support weapons,
smart camouflage and dismounted
infantry training to the British Army.
Our Giraffe and Arthur radars have
seen service on operations with British
forces and are credited with saving
the lives of British troops. We are now
growing through a combination of
organic and non-organic investment
and by investing in the UK’s very
strong scientific, technological,
engineering and mathematical skills.
Earlier this year, we opened the Saab
Innovation Hub where, working with
Imperial College, London, we are
investing some of our 25 per cent of
annual turnover in defence-related
research and development, generating
UK intellectual property for both the
UK home and export markets. We
are working not only with Imperial
scientists but also with other leading
British universities, with Ministry of
Defence scientific establishments and
with technology partners across the
United Kingdom.
We are also attracted by the UK’s well-
regulated but open defence market
and by the cross-Whitehall approach
to defence export support. The UK’s
historical, cultural, economic and
trade links to almost all corners of the
The UK is the largest
operator of Saab’s
Giraffe AMB radars in
the world
We have been
investing in
artificial
intelligence,
automation,
cyber resilience,
big data and so
forth, as well
as software
development,
novel materials
and computing
power
19SAAB UK |
AEROSPACE, DEFENCE & SECURITY
globe also make this a natural home
for our global export operations and
we are therefore growing our design,
development and manufacturing base
here. We have long believed it essential
that any defence investment, whether
by industry or government, should
reflect positively on nationalprosperity.
As an example, over one third of the
content of our Gripen fighter aircraft is
sourced from British companies and we
wanted to know what impact that had
on the British economy. We therefore
commissioned an independent study
by one of the big four professional
services firms in possession of a
certified model of the economy to
run the numbers for us. They showed
that over a ten-year period the direct,
indirect and induced benefits of the UK
supply chain amount to two to three
billion pounds and five to six thousand
jobs. We believe that this level of
analysis should be done on all our
major programmes and we are pleased
to be in discussion with the Ministry of
Defence on this subject. We are proud
that our UK supply chain is made up
of nearly 1,000 companies, 99 per
cent of which are small to medium
sizedenterprises.
Growing closer relationships
As further evidence of our commitment
to inward investment in the UK, we
were delighted to be able to announce
at this year’s Royal International Air
Tattoo, our part in the Anglo-Swedish
shared vision for future combat air. The
“Tempest” fighter system will provide
the Royal Air Force and others with the
next-generation fighter system, fielding
the most advanced technologies yet
seen – a testament to the close and
growing relationship between Sweden
and the UK and one that we intend to
foster carefully over the coming years.
From fighter production for Sweden
in the 1930s, through rapid growth
and investment across the defence
spectrum, to development of the
world’s most sophisticated fighter
system with the UK in 2019, the Saab
journey has been one of innovation,
imagination and invention. We look
forward now to further growth and
an even closer relationship with the
people most important to us – the
men and women who operate
our equipment on behalf of those
responsible for securing our free dom.
The Saab
journey has
been one of
innovation,
imagination
and invention
The Carl-Gustaf M4
multi-role launcher is a
worldwide success

www.saab.com/uk

The Parliamentary Review Publication, in which this article originally appeared, contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster