Sadacca Limited

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Sadacca Limited's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Sadacca Limited is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.sadacca.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | SADACCA LIMITED
CEO Olivier Tsemo
The Sadacca building
CEO Olivier Tsemo says that Sadacca, or the Sheffield
and District African Caribbean Community Association,
has been in operation for over 30 years. During that
time, says Olivier, he and his team have supported the local
community and supplied a range of activities for local people.
Prior to 1986, the organisation operated as the West Indian
Association, which was originally formed in 1955 by a small
number of dedicated Caribbean people who had come to the
UK and were determined to improve their standard of living.
This dedicated group, Olivier says, approached Sheffield City
Council and were able to secure a site for a youth club.
As the community became aware of the services we were offering, the organisation
expanded rapidly and soon we identified a larger site where the community could
come together to participate in cultural and educational activities. In 1980, the
organisation finally found a new site to facilitate its expansion. With the backing of
the community, many of whom provided their time free of charge, we converted
the Old Samuel Osborn Steelworks into a community centre. The centre was
opened in March 1986 by Clive Lloyd, then the captain of the West Indies cricket
team. This is when we began to operate under the name of Sadacca.
Diversifying our provision
Inclusivity has been the cornerstone of the organisation since our first inception.
From our initial work with the Windrush generation in the 1950s, we have
FACTS ABOUT
SADACCA LIMITED
»CEO: Olivier Tsemo
»Founded in 1986
»Located in Sheffield
»Services: Provision of
quality services on behalf
of the African Caribbean
communities of Sheffield
»No. of employees: 30
Sadacca Limited
31SADACCA LIMITED |
COMMUNITY
prided ourselves on our commitment
to inclusivity and to supporting
local people regardless of their
background or circumstances. As we
have renovated and diversified our
provision, we have further increased
the number of people we are able to
assist. We help roughly 300 people
a week, responding to a variety of
needs, and this number is set to
growfurther.
We also provide personal care to older
people living in their own home in
the community. A Sadacca Daycare
service is a social and healthcare
provider for African-Caribbean citizens
of Sheffield. Our services are focused
on the wellbeing of this group, and
the prevention of their social isolation.
The service delivers, assists with and
monitors the health needs of this
group through craft activities, daytrips,
health and nutrition workshops and
signposting to other services. We
have a real opportunity, in line with
Sheffield City Council and the NHS
five-year plan, to develop solutions
that engage by providing innovative,
appropriate services in the community
for the community with a goal of
creating happier, healthier and more
engagedcommunities.
Sadacca Studios
With input from me and our other
directors, we have been able to
renovate the studio and revitalise
ourservices.
The studio now boasts professional
24-track recording facilities, two
production rooms, rehearsal spaces,
a large selection of instruments and
an experienced and diverse range
of music producers and recording
engineers. The studio provides
accessible and affordable spaces for
community music activity alongside an
invaluable resource for local musicians
and producers.
Helping our community to
fulfil its potential
We also provide a range of educational
courses in order that the community
can realise its full potential. We have
linked up with both Sheffield University
and Sheffield Hallam University
through the live architectural project to
help achieve this.
Much of this increase in performance
has been built on the close
monitoring of both volunteers and
staff performance, resulting in tightly
focused intervention to challenge
underperformance. My personal
competence in Totemism, or the
advanced science of observation, has
enabled me to introduce more practical-
based observation activities to allow the
community to have a complete overview
and understanding of our work.
We are going to contribute further to
leading and managing the community,
working to develop approaches related
to theexact and particular needs of
our people. I enjoy leading innovation,
taking calculated risks to enhance
and expedite the learning chances of
our people. These efforts have led to
us becoming a centre of excellence
for education in the community.
The Marcus Garvey Hall
Inclusivity has
been the
cornerstone of
the
organisation
since our
inception
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
30 | SADACCA LIMITED
CEO Olivier Tsemo
The Sadacca building
CEO Olivier Tsemo says that Sadacca, or the Sheffield
and District African Caribbean Community Association,
has been in operation for over 30 years. During that
time, says Olivier, he and his team have supported the local
community and supplied a range of activities for local people.
Prior to 1986, the organisation operated as the West Indian
Association, which was originally formed in 1955 by a small
number of dedicated Caribbean people who had come to the
UK and were determined to improve their standard of living.
This dedicated group, Olivier says, approached Sheffield City
Council and were able to secure a site for a youth club.
As the community became aware of the services we were offering, the organisation
expanded rapidly and soon we identified a larger site where the community could
come together to participate in cultural and educational activities. In 1980, the
organisation finally found a new site to facilitate its expansion. With the backing of
the community, many of whom provided their time free of charge, we converted
the Old Samuel Osborn Steelworks into a community centre. The centre was
opened in March 1986 by Clive Lloyd, then the captain of the West Indies cricket
team. This is when we began to operate under the name of Sadacca.
Diversifying our provision
Inclusivity has been the cornerstone of the organisation since our first inception.
From our initial work with the Windrush generation in the 1950s, we have
FACTS ABOUT
SADACCA LIMITED
»CEO: Olivier Tsemo
»Founded in 1986
»Located in Sheffield
»Services: Provision of
quality services on behalf
of the African Caribbean
communities of Sheffield
»No. of employees: 30
Sadacca Limited
31SADACCA LIMITED |
COMMUNITY
prided ourselves on our commitment
to inclusivity and to supporting
local people regardless of their
background or circumstances. As we
have renovated and diversified our
provision, we have further increased
the number of people we are able to
assist. We help roughly 300 people
a week, responding to a variety of
needs, and this number is set to
growfurther.
We also provide personal care to older
people living in their own home in
the community. A Sadacca Daycare
service is a social and healthcare
provider for African-Caribbean citizens
of Sheffield. Our services are focused
on the wellbeing of this group, and
the prevention of their social isolation.
The service delivers, assists with and
monitors the health needs of this
group through craft activities, daytrips,
health and nutrition workshops and
signposting to other services. We
have a real opportunity, in line with
Sheffield City Council and the NHS
five-year plan, to develop solutions
that engage by providing innovative,
appropriate services in the community
for the community with a goal of
creating happier, healthier and more
engagedcommunities.
Sadacca Studios
With input from me and our other
directors, we have been able to
renovate the studio and revitalise
ourservices.
The studio now boasts professional
24-track recording facilities, two
production rooms, rehearsal spaces,
a large selection of instruments and
an experienced and diverse range
of music producers and recording
engineers. The studio provides
accessible and affordable spaces for
community music activity alongside an
invaluable resource for local musicians
and producers.
Helping our community to
fulfil its potential
We also provide a range of educational
courses in order that the community
can realise its full potential. We have
linked up with both Sheffield University
and Sheffield Hallam University
through the live architectural project to
help achieve this.
Much of this increase in performance
has been built on the close
monitoring of both volunteers and
staff performance, resulting in tightly
focused intervention to challenge
underperformance. My personal
competence in Totemism, or the
advanced science of observation, has
enabled me to introduce more practical-
based observation activities to allow the
community to have a complete overview
and understanding of our work.
We are going to contribute further to
leading and managing the community,
working to develop approaches related
to theexact and particular needs of
our people. I enjoy leading innovation,
taking calculated risks to enhance
and expedite the learning chances of
our people. These efforts have led to
us becoming a centre of excellence
for education in the community.
The Marcus Garvey Hall
Inclusivity has
been the
cornerstone of
the
organisation
since our
inception
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
32 | SADACCA LIMITED
Ihavepersonally brought expertise
from my research work in order to
develop an outstanding mentorship
programme for aspiring community
leaders. In relation to this, I have also
worked alongside the Federation of
Small Businesses, giving many talks
about the training of entrepreneurs.
Beyond our educational programmes,
we are also working with the parole
board to boost diversity. We played
a central role at the parole board
conference and have also invited the
head of the parole board of England
and Wales to come to the centre to
deliver a talk.
The need to expand our
income streams
One of the primary challenges we
face, and indeed that all charities face,
is reduced funding and the removal
of local grants. Since 2014, we have
not received any grants or additional
funding and for a charity as large as
ours, this can be extremely difficult.
As one of the oldest ethnic minority
charities in the UK, we were determined
to tackle this issue. To do this, we have
focused on generating new business to
create new incomestreams.
Our first new project was to establish a
homecare service, going into our local
community to provide care to people
in need. Beyond this, we promote
social events, rent out our premises
and have made sure everything we do
has a financial incentive, otherwise we
will not be able to survive. If we are
able to increase our income, we will be
able to expand our services further and
help even more people.
This will be our focus for the future.
We want to work closely with Sheffield
City Council and local government in
their efforts to engage with the local
community, particularly those of African
and Caribbean backgrounds. We have
developed an intimate knowledge
of these groups and their needs
and they often feel more confident
coming to us than they do going to
see local government. By acting as an
intermediary, we can represent the
25,000 residents ofSheffield.
We are basing our expansion around
the needs of the community and so
have studied their requirements. To
this end, we are planning to introduce
a mental health support service and
are working with Sheffield Flourish and
ADIRA, both organisations that are
involved with mental health initiatives.
A large proportion of our community
suffer from mental health issues
and many are reluctant to attend
mainstream services. We want to
establish a place where they can feel
comfortable so we can signpost them
to bigger services.
With a history stretching back over
30 years, we remain committed and
ready to represent the needs of our
local community for many more years
to come.
Beyond our
educational
programmes,
we are also
working with
the parole
board to boost
diversity
Sebastien Kamgain,
young volunteer

www.sadacca.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Sadacca Limited. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development