SCJS

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by SCJS's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from SCJS is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.scjs.eu

BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
46 | CABA
We are insight driven, which means
listening to what matters to our
community and responding quickly
and appropriately. Moving forward,
we will continue to work closely
with members of all ages around the
work–life balance dichotomy. We
will also continue to raise awareness
of the issues that are affecting
members the most and championing
for change through dialogue with
ICAEW, employers and the press.
This is all part of being a progressive
organisation and ensuring we can
remain ahead of the curve. Finally, we
will continue to reassure members that
they can call us at any time and, most
importantly, that every call is 100 per
cent confidential.
Where we are today
We are an organisation of highly
trained specialists. Our employees and
third-party service providers include
professionally qualified counsellors,
health and wellbeing specialists (such
as nurses), career coaches, trainers,
debt advisers, and legal advisers.
No matter what role an individual
might hold at CABA, every person
who works for us willingly lives by
certain important values, namely
respect, teamwork, integrity and
passion. We also build these values
into our recruitment process, ensuring
that all people who work at CABA
live and breathe our values and
demonstrate our inclusive culture of
continuousimprovement.
2018 saw us expand our offering
still further, supporting over 25,000
members with wellbeing advice and
information, access to online tools, and
a range of tailored services. We also
saw our member engagement increase
substantially. Over the year, members’
use of our counselling service was up
31 per cent, thereby suggesting that
members are being more proactive
in reaching out for help, specifically
around mental health issues. We hope
this means the stigma of reaching
out for support is starting to break
down and that people are feeling
empowered to take control of their
own emotional wellbeing.
Today, we believe that CABA is more
relevant than ever – supporting a
much wider constituency of users
with an ever-evolving set of services
which address the kind of emotional,
professional and personal challenges
we all face today. Wellbeing is at the
heart of everything we do – from
providing a listening ear in troubled
times, to personal and professional
development, all the way through to
career support and financial assistance.
Our aim of empowering individuals to
look after their own wellbeing is at the
forefront of all we do.
Moving forward, we are committed
to extending our relevance to more
of the ICAEW community, launching
new services which meet the needs
of chartered accountants and their
families, and championing modern-day
benevolence in society at large. The
promise is clear: CABA is with you for
life – not just in troubled times, but all
the time.
We are insight
driven, which
means
listening to
what matters
to our
community
and
responding
quickly and
appropriately
Delegates at a
“Supercharge your sleep”
training course
47SCJS |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Founders Gary Linton and
NickApps
Training the Nigerian Navy in
law enforcement techniques
Gary Linton founded SCJS in 2011, focusing on
supporting and delivering criminal justice projects across
the globe. Having worked as a Detective Superintendent
for Hampshire Constabulary, he has extensive experience in
the field and has worked closely with both the UK government
and the European Union. In order to adapt to Brexit, they
have launched a new arm of the business, SCJS Europe, based
in Brussels. Gary tells
The Parliamentary Review
about his
background in the police force and how SCJS have spread
around the world.
In 2003, while working as Detective Superintendent for Hampshire Constabulary, I
was tasked with trying to improve the way the police handle sensitive information,
including criminal records, fingerprints and DNA. This was the start of quite a
journey, which saw the creation of the then Association of Chief Police Officers
Criminal Records Office, otherwise known as ACRO. From humble beginnings,
with three other colleagues working out of a Portakabin office, ACRO went on
to achieve great things. As well as working with the government on a number of
significant crisis situations, such as the release of foreign prisoners. I also led the
creation of the European Criminal Record Information System as an EU-funded
UKproject.
In 2010, ACRO became well regarded nationally, winning the top place in the
Sunday Times survey of Best Public-Sector Organisations. I also won two personal
awards: Best Leader in the Public Sector and Most People-Focused CEO in the
Public Sector. Following my retirement from the police in November 2011, together
FACTS ABOUT
SCJS
»Founder: Gary Linton
»Established in 2011
»Based in Southampton
»Services: Development of
criminal justice processes
worldwide
»No. of employees: 30
SCJS
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
48 | SCJS
with former colleagues Nick Apps
and Nigel Szymanski, Iestablished
Sustainable Criminal Justice Solutions.
SCJS is a not-for-profit community
interest company, working on a variety
of international projects. This included
a European Commission-funded
three-year project concerning the
EU-wide biometric exchange of DNA
and fingerprints on behalf of the UK
government. We were also awarded a
similar three-year project to deliver on
behalf of the Belgian government.
Working with the EU and the
UK government
We are largely a public-sector operator,
delivering international criminal justice
projects on behalf of the UK Home
Office and Ministry of Justice, as well
as projects funded directly by the
European Commission.
We are now an EU-certified mandated
body for the purposes of delivering
twinning projects and have secured a
place on the government’s Prosperity
Fund and Conflict, Stability and
Security Fund frameworks. Members
of our team have operated across
more than 60 countries, delivering
a wide range of rule-of-law projects
that include chemical, biological,
radiological and nuclear defence-
building initiatives. We have also
successfully achieved the latest ISO
9001 2015 standard.
Those inside government, officials
within the European Commission, and
SCJS associate experts and partners
all seem to sense our passion and
progress and want to be part of this
exciting journey. The recent positive
responses from key government
departments to attend our advisory
board are strong indications of this
increasing validity.
The ability to engage internationally
has been fundamental to our success.
The ethos of trying to build sustainable
programmes overseas while
understanding the need to respect
different cultures and legal contexts is
something we strive for.
Our overseas trainers have mentored
a wide range of agency personnel
across different nationalities and
cultures, attracting repeat business.
All of this is underpinned by dedicated
project support officers, who have
been effectively handling a wide
range of projects from our base
inSouthampton.
We have worked in locations as
diverse as Pakistan, Nigeria, Jordan,
Iraq, Lebanon and the Caribbean.
Projects have been equally as diverse
and have included CBRNe emergency
medicine training, court notification
processes, anti-money laundering,
disaster victim identification, crime
analysis and prevention, crime scene
investigation, court administration, and
illicit drugprofiling.
We now have several experts deployed
on a semi-permanent basis overseas,
including in Turkey, Kenya and
Brussels, all of whom are making
significant progress amid what are
often very challenging circumstances.
Our humble beginnings:
working in a Portakabin office
Members of
our team have
operated
across more
than 60
countries,
delivering a
wide range of
rule-of-law
projects
49SCJS |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Adapting to Brexit
Brexit, whatever this looks like in 2019,
is likely to have an impact on our work.
However, our strategy to counter this
situation is already starting to have a
positive effect.
Our Brexit strategy has two main
aspects. The first has been to establish
SCJS Europe, a Belgian not-for-profit
entity, established under Belgian
royal decree. It has an office and staff
adjacent to the European Parliament
in the heart of Brussels and close to
several key European Commission
offices, with whom we engage. We
have recruited Jean-Paul Pritchard,
formerly Civipol, France, as programme
manager for SCJS Europe.
We are now receiving very
encouraging signs from the European
Commission, indicating that they are
likely to engage with SCJS Europe,
due to our proximity and Belgian
status. Initially, this will probably be as
a partner with the Belgian authorities
and other member states. In support of
this approach, we have had a number
of very positive discussions with
officials in the Belgian government.
The other aspect of our post-Brexit
strategy has been to secure a greater
proportion of UK funding for our
international project delivery. Our
inclusion in UK frameworks such
as the CSSF has been significant in
this regard. We have now started a
very promising rule-of-law project in
Pakistan, which is funded by the CSSF,
and we have been approached about
delivering similar work in East Africa.
This year has also seen the introduction
of GLSI, which provides equipment for
SCJS programmes overseas. Natalie
Masters, formerly of North Yorkshire
County Council, has been appointed
to manage this area, which, together
with the GLSI team, has made a
promising start.
We are keen to maintain quality and
attention to detail as we grow, and we
set great store on continuous learning.
The dedication and passion shown by
our growing team, supported by ISO
standards, are testament to this.
Government- and European
Commission-funded projects are
subject to rigorous independent
auditing. We currently enjoy a 100 per
cent successful track record across all
audits, which our financial team are
rightly proud of.
Above all else, we consider staff as
the most important component of
our success. We are now doubling
the size of our UK office and are
already looking at a larger and
better space to accommodate SCJS
Europe, which should be in place by
September2019.
We are committed to providing
relevant training for the team, such as
recent hostile environment awareness
training and major trauma first aid. In
some cases, we also fund individual
specialised courses. Our staff are
passionate about maintaining their
professional currency and commit time
to ensure that they are up to date with
specific skill areas.
The ability to
engage
internationally
has been
fundamental
to our success
The SCJS office team
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
48 | SCJS
with former colleagues Nick Apps
and Nigel Szymanski, Iestablished
Sustainable Criminal Justice Solutions.
SCJS is a not-for-profit community
interest company, working on a variety
of international projects. This included
a European Commission-funded
three-year project concerning the
EU-wide biometric exchange of DNA
and fingerprints on behalf of the UK
government. We were also awarded a
similar three-year project to deliver on
behalf of the Belgian government.
Working with the EU and the
UK government
We are largely a public-sector operator,
delivering international criminal justice
projects on behalf of the UK Home
Office and Ministry of Justice, as well
as projects funded directly by the
European Commission.
We are now an EU-certified mandated
body for the purposes of delivering
twinning projects and have secured a
place on the government’s Prosperity
Fund and Conflict, Stability and
Security Fund frameworks. Members
of our team have operated across
more than 60 countries, delivering
a wide range of rule-of-law projects
that include chemical, biological,
radiological and nuclear defence-
building initiatives. We have also
successfully achieved the latest ISO
9001 2015 standard.
Those inside government, officials
within the European Commission, and
SCJS associate experts and partners
all seem to sense our passion and
progress and want to be part of this
exciting journey. The recent positive
responses from key government
departments to attend our advisory
board are strong indications of this
increasing validity.
The ability to engage internationally
has been fundamental to our success.
The ethos of trying to build sustainable
programmes overseas while
understanding the need to respect
different cultures and legal contexts is
something we strive for.
Our overseas trainers have mentored
a wide range of agency personnel
across different nationalities and
cultures, attracting repeat business.
All of this is underpinned by dedicated
project support officers, who have
been effectively handling a wide
range of projects from our base
inSouthampton.
We have worked in locations as
diverse as Pakistan, Nigeria, Jordan,
Iraq, Lebanon and the Caribbean.
Projects have been equally as diverse
and have included CBRNe emergency
medicine training, court notification
processes, anti-money laundering,
disaster victim identification, crime
analysis and prevention, crime scene
investigation, court administration, and
illicit drugprofiling.
We now have several experts deployed
on a semi-permanent basis overseas,
including in Turkey, Kenya and
Brussels, all of whom are making
significant progress amid what are
often very challenging circumstances.
Our humble beginnings:
working in a Portakabin office
Members of
our team have
operated
across more
than 60
countries,
delivering a
wide range of
rule-of-law
projects
49SCJS |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Adapting to Brexit
Brexit, whatever this looks like in 2019,
is likely to have an impact on our work.
However, our strategy to counter this
situation is already starting to have a
positive effect.
Our Brexit strategy has two main
aspects. The first has been to establish
SCJS Europe, a Belgian not-for-profit
entity, established under Belgian
royal decree. It has an office and staff
adjacent to the European Parliament
in the heart of Brussels and close to
several key European Commission
offices, with whom we engage. We
have recruited Jean-Paul Pritchard,
formerly Civipol, France, as programme
manager for SCJS Europe.
We are now receiving very
encouraging signs from the European
Commission, indicating that they are
likely to engage with SCJS Europe,
due to our proximity and Belgian
status. Initially, this will probably be as
a partner with the Belgian authorities
and other member states. In support of
this approach, we have had a number
of very positive discussions with
officials in the Belgian government.
The other aspect of our post-Brexit
strategy has been to secure a greater
proportion of UK funding for our
international project delivery. Our
inclusion in UK frameworks such
as the CSSF has been significant in
this regard. We have now started a
very promising rule-of-law project in
Pakistan, which is funded by the CSSF,
and we have been approached about
delivering similar work in East Africa.
This year has also seen the introduction
of GLSI, which provides equipment for
SCJS programmes overseas. Natalie
Masters, formerly of North Yorkshire
County Council, has been appointed
to manage this area, which, together
with the GLSI team, has made a
promising start.
We are keen to maintain quality and
attention to detail as we grow, and we
set great store on continuous learning.
The dedication and passion shown by
our growing team, supported by ISO
standards, are testament to this.
Government- and European
Commission-funded projects are
subject to rigorous independent
auditing. We currently enjoy a 100 per
cent successful track record across all
audits, which our financial team are
rightly proud of.
Above all else, we consider staff as
the most important component of
our success. We are now doubling
the size of our UK office and are
already looking at a larger and
better space to accommodate SCJS
Europe, which should be in place by
September2019.
We are committed to providing
relevant training for the team, such as
recent hostile environment awareness
training and major trauma first aid. In
some cases, we also fund individual
specialised courses. Our staff are
passionate about maintaining their
professional currency and commit time
to ensure that they are up to date with
specific skill areas.
The ability to
engage
internationally
has been
fundamental
to our success
The SCJS office team

www.scjs.eu

This article was sponsored by SCJS. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster