Scottish Veterans' Residences

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Scottish Veterans' Residences's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Scottish Veterans' Residences is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.svronline.org

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20 | RHP
Three-step plan
With governmental refocus and
additional funding for social housing,
now is an exciting time for our
sector. That said, there are still some
barriers to overcome. I would ask the
government to:
1. Keep backing housing associations:
We are a highly successful public-
private partnership and want to be
great partners on national and local
levels in helping to solve the housing
crisis. It is heartening to see the
additional funding the government
has committed to the housing
sector. However, as the national
housing federation’s “Additionality
of Affordable Housing” campaign
highlights, it would be great to
see the government being flexible
with this funding, including within
elements such as infrastructure and
planning permission support.
2. Invest in innovation in the housing
sector: We would love the
government to make grant funding
available for housing providers to
experiment with new forms of house
building and use of new technology.
If we are going to solve the housing
crisis, we need to thinkdifferently.
3. Do not forget young people: There
is a whole generation of people who
are simply priced out of the housing
market and forced to live in shared
houses or remain at home with their
parents. As mentioned previously,
we are on a mission to do
something about this by pioneering
new forms of housing tailored to
meet the needs of youngpeople.
The tip of the iceberg
Everything that I have highlighted is
just the tip of the iceberg, not only for
RHP but also for the sector as a whole.
Now is a really dynamic time for the
housing sector and presents excellent
opportunities for the entire country.
With ongoing guidance and support
from the government as well as creative
solutions, I believe we can fulfil our big
ambitions collectively and provide the
number of homes that are vitally needed
for this generation and the next.
There are so many interesting avenues
to explore, and a key part of our five-
year strategy is to be the testbed of
new ideas in the sector.
If we are going to solve the housing
crisis, we must work together as a
sector, try new and improved ways of
doing things and seek out partnerships
with different types of organisations to
enable our resources to go further. We
must also continue to be demanding
of the government in delivering the
funding that’s been promised, allowing
for flexibility in how this is used.
Looking at
modern
methods of
construction is
another key
strand of our
strategy
RHP are carrying out
a number of SMART
home technology trials
(one including accessing
RHP services through
an Amazon Echo Dot)
saving customers’
money and time
21SCOTTISH VETERANS’ RESIDENCES |
COMMUNITY
CEO Martin Nadin OBE
Veterans from SVR on a week of
outdoor activities in the Highlands
Established in 1910 in response to the plight of military
veterans sleeping rough on the streets of Edinburgh,
Scottish Veterans’ Residences is Scotland’s oldest ex-service
charity. SVR provides support and accommodation for ex-armed
forces and merchant marine personnel in need, for as long as
they may require it, and assists those that are able to return to
independent living. CEO Martin Nadin OBE originally trained as
an army biomedical scientist and after that served in the Middle
East, Africa, Northern Ireland, the Balkans and Afghanistan,
where he planned, delivered and governed worldwide
healthcare support for military personnel and their families. His
experience and knowledge of the health and social care sector
has supported the work of SVR since his appointment in 2018.
The challenges of service life exert positive and negative effects on individuals,
both during and after service. Most veterans reintegrate into civilian life effectively,
where they make a positive contribution.
A relatively small number of veterans, however, do struggle and require varying
degrees of support to live safely and with dignity. In recognition of the promise and
commitment that underpins the Armed Forces Covenant, we believe that those who
have served the nation should be supported when in need, in return for theirservice.
SVR’s operations
SVR is a thriving registered social landlord. We operate housing support services in
Scotland’s three largest cities. The original residence, Whitefoord House, is located
FACTS ABOUT
SCOTTISH VETERANS’
RESIDENCES
»CEO: Martin Nadin OBE
»Established in 1910
»Services: Registered housing
support services and social
housing
»No. of employees: 60
»SVR’s patron is His Royal
Highness The Duke of
Gloucester
Scottish Veterans’
Residences
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22 | SCOTTISH VETERANS’ RESIDENCES
at the foot of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile,
close to the Palace of Holyroodhouse.
Rosendael in Broughty Ferry, Dundee,
is an imposing Victorian property and
became our second residence in 1933
after the Kyd family gifted it to SVR.
Both these establishments are houses
of multiple occupation with 85 and 44
en-suite rooms respectively. In 2014,
we built the multi-award-winning
Bellrock Close in Cranhill, Glasgow. It
houses our transitional support service
by providing 30 one-bedroom flats.
We support over 200 veterans annually,
and around a quarter move on, taking
up their own tenancies. Our residents
range from those in their early twenties
to those in their early nineties, with
younger veterans being more likely to
move on. Older residents tend to stay
with us in a long-term capacity, enjoying
the support, security and companionship
of our communityenvironment.
The high standard of our
accommodation is important. When
a veteran first arrives, the quality of
our housing makes an immediate and
positive impact. If someone is homeless
or struggling, personal dignity is easily
lost. Our first step is to help residents
recover their dignity. Our housing
support service is the key to helping
our residents return to fulfilling and
independent lives.
Each residence has a team of qualified
staff who work closely with partners
from other organisations to provide
a person-centred service for each
resident. We use an outcome reporting
tool to help them identify individual
support goals and map their progress.
Fundraising and investment allow
us to offer additional services. These
include two in-house therapeutic
counsellors, activity weeks in the
Scottish Highlands, art groups at each
residence and a range of trips, events
and activities. Partner organisations
help with employment and volunteer
mentoring, addiction support,
additional mental health support,
money and specialist pension advice.
More people and fewer
veterans, but the issue remains
Our governing body has recently
authorised a strategy to provide us
with fresh direction and guidance. In
developing the strategy, we considered
the period from 2019 to 2050.
Wedeliberately chose to look out to
2050 to undertake a generational
review. By 2050, it is predicted that
the overall UK population will rise to
around 75million people.
The number of veterans will reduce,
both in absolute numbers and
A member of staff chats to
a veteran in the gardens
SVR residents are allowed
to keep their dogs
We support
over 200
veterans
annually
BEST PRACTICE SPONSOR 2020
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
22 | SCOTTISH VETERANS’ RESIDENCES
at the foot of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile,
close to the Palace of Holyroodhouse.
Rosendael in Broughty Ferry, Dundee,
is an imposing Victorian property and
became our second residence in 1933
after the Kyd family gifted it to SVR.
Both these establishments are houses
of multiple occupation with 85 and 44
en-suite rooms respectively. In 2014,
we built the multi-award-winning
Bellrock Close in Cranhill, Glasgow. It
houses our transitional support service
by providing 30 one-bedroom flats.
We support over 200 veterans annually,
and around a quarter move on, taking
up their own tenancies. Our residents
range from those in their early twenties
to those in their early nineties, with
younger veterans being more likely to
move on. Older residents tend to stay
with us in a long-term capacity, enjoying
the support, security and companionship
of our communityenvironment.
The high standard of our
accommodation is important. When
a veteran first arrives, the quality of
our housing makes an immediate and
positive impact. If someone is homeless
or struggling, personal dignity is easily
lost. Our first step is to help residents
recover their dignity. Our housing
support service is the key to helping
our residents return to fulfilling and
independent lives.
Each residence has a team of qualified
staff who work closely with partners
from other organisations to provide
a person-centred service for each
resident. We use an outcome reporting
tool to help them identify individual
support goals and map their progress.
Fundraising and investment allow
us to offer additional services. These
include two in-house therapeutic
counsellors, activity weeks in the
Scottish Highlands, art groups at each
residence and a range of trips, events
and activities. Partner organisations
help with employment and volunteer
mentoring, addiction support,
additional mental health support,
money and specialist pension advice.
More people and fewer
veterans, but the issue remains
Our governing body has recently
authorised a strategy to provide us
with fresh direction and guidance. In
developing the strategy, we considered
the period from 2019 to 2050.
Wedeliberately chose to look out to
2050 to undertake a generational
review. By 2050, it is predicted that
the overall UK population will rise to
around 75million people.
The number of veterans will reduce,
both in absolute numbers and
A member of staff chats to
a veteran in the gardens
SVR residents are allowed
to keep their dogs
We support
over 200
veterans
annually
23SCOTTISH VETERANS’ RESIDENCES |
COMMUNITY
as a proportion of the overall UK
population. We expect the significant
majority of veterans will continue
to transition readily back to civilian
life, but around five per cent may
require support at some time after
leavingservice.
While this may appear to suggest a
reduction in demand, we predict a
counterbalance:
»Our analysis suggests the number of
veterans with multiple and complex
needs is increasing
»As the overall UK population rises,
there will be greater pressure
on housing, making finding
accommodation more challenging,
which may lead to higher levels
ofhomelessness
»We expect national and local
governments to come under further
spending pressure to provide and
maintain adequate health, welfare
and social services; continued
pressures may lead to a reduction in
the funding for supported housing
Over time, we have improved our
service offering, making it increasingly
attractive and resulting in a
corresponding growth in service users.
We aspire to develop this further and
support our residents, helping them
to achieve the best outcomes they
possibly can.
We have identified two principal
areas for service improvement. First,
we want to develop the activity and
pathways that support residents
who are able to enter or return to
sustainableemployment.
Secondly, we must introduce tapered
support for former residents who
have secured their own tenancies.
This means that, if required, they can
access timely and effective support to
enable them to retain their tenancy
and continue to live as independently
as possible.
Both areas will require us to collaborate
with other organisations and develop
a sustainable funding model to initiate
and maintain theseservices.
The governing body are also
streamlining our governance structures
and overhauling our procedures
and processes to ensure that we are
completely ready to deliver a refreshed
strategy in support of our veterans
now and in the years to come.
Our first step
is to help
residents
recover their
dignity
»WILLIAM’S STORY
William lived at Rosendael for six months after leaving the army. He
now has a new job, a new home and a new life in Dundee.
When William left the army age 23, he didn’t feel that going back
home was an option for him. When it became clear he did not have
available housing, his welfare team contacted SVR and arranged to
bring him to Rosendael. At first, he felt a little intimidated being in a
new place, but he soon connected with some of the other residents.
Within a few months William had settled in, started playing rugby
and felt ready to move on to a more independent life. He took a job
advertised with a local butcher business, Scott Brothers, and started
to look at moving into his own home.
With SVR’s strong links, William was able to acquire a secure tenancy
with the help of Rosendael staff. He is now settled into a great, well-
furnished flat, just around the corner from his workplace. He still has
contact with his keyworker from Rosendael, who pops in from time to
time to provide a bit of support as William is finding his feet.
William says he would advise anyone in the same situation as him
that help is available if they need it: “The work done at Rosendael is
fantastic. I couldn’t imagine a place like it.”
All three residences have
art groups for veterans

www.svronline.org

This article was sponsored by Scottish Veterans' Residences. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss.

Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss

Even by the standards of the day –this has been one of the most exciting and unpredictable years in British politics.

The leadership election we’ve just seen marks a huge moment in our country’s history. This government is taking a decisive new direction, embracing the opportunities of Brexit and preparing our country to flourish outside the EU.

As international trade secretary, I’ll be driving forward work on the free trade agreements that are going to be a priority for the government. Free trade isn’t just an abstract concept bandied around by technocrats. It is crucial for a strong economy and for the ability of families to make ends meet. Free trade benefits people in every part of our country, as British firms export to new markets and people doing the weekly shop have access to a wider choice of goods at lower prices.

The essence of free trade is in the title: freedom. It’s about giving people the power to exchange their goods without heavy government taxation or interference. Commerce and free exchange are the engine room of prosperity and social mobility. I’m determined to tackle the forces who want to hold that back.

One of my priorities is agreeing an exciting new free trade deal with the US, building on the great relationship between our two countries and the Prime Minister and US President. But I’ll also be talking to other partners including New Zealand, Australia and fast-growing Asian markets.

And with the EU too, we want a friendly and constructive relationship, as constitutional equals, and as friends and partners in facing the challenges that lie ahead – a relationship based on a deep free trade agreement. Our country produces some of the world’s most successful exports, and the opportunity to bring these to the rest of the world should make us all excited about the future. It is this excitement, optimism and ambition which I believe will come to define this government.

For too long now, we have been told Britain isn’t big or important enough to survive outside the EU – that we have to accept a deal that reflects our reduced circumstances. I say that’s rubbish. With the right policies in place, we can be the most competitive, free-thinking, prosperous nation on Earth exporting to the world and leading in new developments like AI. To do that, we’ll give the brilliant next generation of entrepreneurs the tools they need to succeed. Since 2015, there has been a staggering 85 per cent rise in the number of businesses set up by 18 to 24 year olds – twice the level set up by the same age group in France and Germany. We’ll help them flourish by championing enterprise, cutting taxes and making regulation flexible and responsive to their needs.

As we do that, we’ll level up and unite all parts of the UK with great transport links, fibre broadband in every home and proper school funding, so everyone shares in our country’s success.

2019 has been the year of brewing economic and political revolution. 2020 will be the year when a revitalised Conservative government turbo charges the economy, boosts prospects for people across the country, and catapults Britain back to the forefront of the world stage.



Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss
Secretary of State for International Development