Sheffield City Hall

A Message from Lord Pickles and Lord Blunkett, followed by Sheffield City Hall's best practice article

The ability to listen and learn from one another has always been vital in parliament, in business and in most aspects of daily life. But at this particular moment in time, as national and global events continue to reiterate, it is uncommonly crucial that we forge new channels of communication and reinforce existing ones. The following article from Sheffield City Hall is an attempt to do just that. We would welcome your thoughts on this or any other Parliamentary Review article.

Blunkett signature Rt Hon The Lord David Blunkett
Pickles signature Rt Hon The Lord Eric Pickles

www.sheffieldcityhall.co.uk

THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | SHEFFIELD CITY HALL
CEO Andrew Snelling
Sheffield City Hall
Sheffield City Hall was initially conceived both to provide work
for the local unemployed tradesmen during the depression
and as a commemoration to those who fell in the war.
Designed by RIBA Royal Gold Medallist, architect Vincent Harris,
in 1932 it opened as a 2,271-capacity, purpose-built main hall for
public speaking and classical concerts, a venue with a 850-capacity
art deco ballroom and a 500-capacity memorial hall. It developed
to become a major feature on the UK live entertainment
touring route and a major convention centre, hosting numerous
international and national conferences. The rise of the arena
network in the early 1990s dented its prominence, but it remains
a major fixture on the circuit. CEO Andrew Snelling explains more.
SIV has been operating the city hall on behalf of the council since 2000. It oversaw
a £13-million refurbishment in 2005, meaning that the venue would remain
competitive into the 21st century.
SIV is part of Sheffield City Trust, a not-for-profit charity, operating both leisure and
entertainment facilities on behalf of Sheffield City Council and putting money back
into Sheffield for the benefit of the people of the city. The health and wellbeing of
the people of Sheffield is a central pillar of our charitable objectives.
While the city hall is a commercial venture, we are also at the heart of the local and
regional community. We run tea dances, lunchtime choirs and operate lower hire
rates to make it possible for local dance schools and other community groups and
university societies to hire the venue.
FACTS ABOUT
SHEFFIELD CITY HALL
»CEO: Andrew Snelling
»Established in 1932
»Based in Sheffield, South
Yorkshire
»No. of employees: 50, plus 80
occasional
»Annual visits: Over 280,000
Sheffield City Hall
39SHEFFIELD CITY HALL |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Change in the importance of
live touring
There is a generally-held belief that an
entertainment venue has a licence to
print money; nothing, however, could
be further from the truth. Since the
onset of digital downloading and the
subsequent drop in recorded income
for artistes; touring, which was once
a promotional loss leader for the
much more lucrative album sales, has
now become a major income stream
formusicians.
As a consequence, the negotiations
with promoters and hirers of venues
have become much more stringent
and hardnosed as the “pieces of pie”
available to all become smaller, with
the artiste demanding a larger share.
In this prevailing environment,
the venue’s cut of ticket income is
reduced and the secondary spend,
predominantly in the area of catering,
becomes much more important.
Currently, year-on-year, we see roughly
the same number of events and
attendance numbers; thus, we need to
increase footfall and more importantly
the yield per head.
Effect of the Licensing Act
The Licensing Act of 2003, while
levelling the playing field, also
splintered the night-time economy
into many different genres, increasing
choice but splitting the audience,
thus providing another challenge to
thevenue.
The time available to sell food and
beverages is limited and with the
massive increase in choice of bars
and pubs in the city centre, there is a
pressure to develop increasingly more
inventive ideas to attract customers
to the venue earlier, or encourage
pre-payment for refreshments such as
when booking tickets, or on the night
in the shape of mobile apps.
We have also developed pre-show,
pop-up dining and hospitality
experiences in-house over the
last couple of years to encourage
customers to eat at the venue, with
some success, and numbers continue
to grow annually.
Performing Rights Society
challenge ahead
PRS, an organisation for musicians
and composers, has recently secured
a rise in performance income for its
members. This income is based on
a percentage of the net box office
income per show. However, this didn’t
go as far as PRS wanted and there is a
good chance that their other objectives
will resurface in the future. Left: City hall, ballroom
Right: City hall, main
entrance foyer
There is a
generally-held
belief that an
entertainment
venue has a
licence to
print money;
nothing,
however,
could be
further from
the truth
BEST PRACTICE REPRESENTATIVE 2019
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
38 | SHEFFIELD CITY HALL
CEO Andrew Snelling
Sheffield City Hall
Sheffield City Hall was initially conceived both to provide work
for the local unemployed tradesmen during the depression
and as a commemoration to those who fell in the war.
Designed by RIBA Royal Gold Medallist, architect Vincent Harris,
in 1932 it opened as a 2,271-capacity, purpose-built main hall for
public speaking and classical concerts, a venue with a 850-capacity
art deco ballroom and a 500-capacity memorial hall. It developed
to become a major feature on the UK live entertainment
touring route and a major convention centre, hosting numerous
international and national conferences. The rise of the arena
network in the early 1990s dented its prominence, but it remains
a major fixture on the circuit. CEO Andrew Snelling explains more.
SIV has been operating the city hall on behalf of the council since 2000. It oversaw
a £13-million refurbishment in 2005, meaning that the venue would remain
competitive into the 21st century.
SIV is part of Sheffield City Trust, a not-for-profit charity, operating both leisure and
entertainment facilities on behalf of Sheffield City Council and putting money back
into Sheffield for the benefit of the people of the city. The health and wellbeing of
the people of Sheffield is a central pillar of our charitable objectives.
While the city hall is a commercial venture, we are also at the heart of the local and
regional community. We run tea dances, lunchtime choirs and operate lower hire
rates to make it possible for local dance schools and other community groups and
university societies to hire the venue.
FACTS ABOUT
SHEFFIELD CITY HALL
»CEO: Andrew Snelling
»Established in 1932
»Based in Sheffield, South
Yorkshire
»No. of employees: 50, plus 80
occasional
»Annual visits: Over 280,000
Sheffield City Hall
39SHEFFIELD CITY HALL |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Change in the importance of
live touring
There is a generally-held belief that an
entertainment venue has a licence to
print money; nothing, however, could
be further from the truth. Since the
onset of digital downloading and the
subsequent drop in recorded income
for artistes; touring, which was once
a promotional loss leader for the
much more lucrative album sales, has
now become a major income stream
formusicians.
As a consequence, the negotiations
with promoters and hirers of venues
have become much more stringent
and hardnosed as the “pieces of pie”
available to all become smaller, with
the artiste demanding a larger share.
In this prevailing environment,
the venue’s cut of ticket income is
reduced and the secondary spend,
predominantly in the area of catering,
becomes much more important.
Currently, year-on-year, we see roughly
the same number of events and
attendance numbers; thus, we need to
increase footfall and more importantly
the yield per head.
Effect of the Licensing Act
The Licensing Act of 2003, while
levelling the playing field, also
splintered the night-time economy
into many different genres, increasing
choice but splitting the audience,
thus providing another challenge to
thevenue.
The time available to sell food and
beverages is limited and with the
massive increase in choice of bars
and pubs in the city centre, there is a
pressure to develop increasingly more
inventive ideas to attract customers
to the venue earlier, or encourage
pre-payment for refreshments such as
when booking tickets, or on the night
in the shape of mobile apps.
We have also developed pre-show,
pop-up dining and hospitality
experiences in-house over the
last couple of years to encourage
customers to eat at the venue, with
some success, and numbers continue
to grow annually.
Performing Rights Society
challenge ahead
PRS, an organisation for musicians
and composers, has recently secured
a rise in performance income for its
members. This income is based on
a percentage of the net box office
income per show. However, this didn’t
go as far as PRS wanted and there is a
good chance that their other objectives
will resurface in the future. Left: City hall, ballroom
Right: City hall, main
entrance foyer
There is a
generally-held
belief that an
entertainment
venue has a
licence to
print money;
nothing,
however,
could be
further from
the truth
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
THE PARLIAMENTARY REVIEW
Highlighting best practice
40 | SHEFFIELD CITY HALL
They are also looking to gain a
percentage of the money from catering
associated with live performances, car
parking, sponsorship, booking fees, all
of which will squeeze the venues even
more; ironically the very places that
their members make their money from
performing live.
Other moves to counter
negative effects
They may be controversial, but
booking fees are not just an essential
income stream for keeping the
box office funded, but also for
financing the venue, its maintenance
anddevelopment.
It’s essential to build and maintain a
large customer database both as a
means for marketing our product and
for building loyalty. A loyal audience
needs to be established by keeping
the quality of all our products high;
including the actual entertainment
offering. The emphasis should be
placed on programming an excellent
product, instead of booking anything
we are offered just to fill the diary.
We have created a business
development team to programme
entertainment, business and sporting
events, and to proactively generate
new income streams and maximise the
potential of current ones on behalf
of the venue. The commercial income
generated supports the community
events and the maintenance of
the venue, which means so much
to the company and the people of
Sheffield. This business has been
developed substantially since the 2005
refurbishment.
Continuing to innovate
We can’t sit back. We need to be
inventive and creative and continue
to develop new products and
income streams, but we cannot
work in isolation. We already have
good community relations but are
continuing to build relationships with
local and regional promoters and new
businesspartners.
SIV also manages and operates
the FlyDSA Arena in Sheffield, thus
providing the ideal opportunity to
help develop an organic growth for
an artiste through their career, in
conjunction with promoters we can
move them up through the venues.
The same initiative can be applied to
conferences that outgrow the city
hall and move to the Steel Hall at
Sheffield Arena, keeping the business
within the organisation and supporting
the economic benefit for the city
ofSheffield.
The technical department is being
upgraded to offer a service beyond the
city hall to the rest of the SIV estate.
Staff and equipment will be hired
out to generate more income for the
venue and keep the service in-house.
It is a hard, fast-moving market, but
we have the iconic building and are
investing in the people to continually
drive development and look at ways
to improve our offering to stay
relevant and ahead of our competitors,
ensuring our much-loved venue
is still here for future generations
toexperience.
Booking fees
are not just an
essential
income stream
for keeping
the box office
funded, but
also for
financing the
venue, its
maintenance
and
development
City hall, memorial hall
41IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED |
CIVIL SOCIETY
Chief Executive Ruth Gorman
John values his
independence and
doing things for himself
Imagine, Act and Succeed is a registered charity in the North West
that works to support people who have a wide variety of needs.
They place great emphasis on ensuring that everyone they care
for can continue to live as independently as possible, and they
work closely with local authorities to achieve this. One of their
most innovative projects is Railway Road, a housing development
in which their users live alongside general let tenants, creating a
community of support. Chief Executive Ruth Gorman explains this
inventive approach and outlines their central ethos.
The late Prime Minister of New Zealand, Norman Kirk, famously argued that all
people wanted from life was: “somewhere to work, somewhere to live, someone
to love and something to hope for”. His vision of a decent society is reflected,
unsurprisingly, in the ordinary aspirations of the people we work alongside.
Naturally, they also wish to be part of the wider community as is their right – not to
be apart from this community, as has too often been the case historically.
This is why helping to “make the ordinary ordinary” is the business we are in.
Our mission is to creatively support people to live the life they wish to lead. Active
listening, imagination, resourcefulness and flexibility are the skills that we draw
upon to help people to achieve this.
We believe that our task isn’t so much to provide a support service but rather to
cultivate the conditions for an ecosystem of community support in which people
can grow and flourish.
FACTS ABOUT
IMAGINE, ACT AND SUCCEED
»Chief Executive: Ruth Gorman
»Established in 1988, registered
as a charity in 2011
»Based in the North West
»Services: Homecare agency
»No. of employees: 510
»No. of users: 150
»www.imagineactandsucceed.
Imagine, Act and
Succeed

www.sheffieldcityhall.co.uk

This article was sponsored by Sheffield City Hall. The Parliamentary Review is wholly funded by the representatives who write for it. The publication in which this article originally appeared contained the following foreword from Rt Hon Michael Gove.

Rt Hon Michael Gove's Foreword For The Parliamentary Review

By Rt Hon Michael Gove

This year's Parliamentary Review comes at a momentous time for parliament, as we collectively determine the destiny of the United Kingdom. 

On October 31, the UK will leave the European Union. The successful implementation of this process is this government's number-one priority.

Three years after a historic referendum vote, we will deliver on the decisive mandate from the British people. Trust in our democracy depends on it. Until that final hour, we will work determinedly and diligently to negotiate a deal, one that abolishes the backstop and upholds the warm and close relationship we share with our friends, allies and neighbours in the EU. But in the event that the EU refuses to meet us at the table, we must be prepared to leave without a deal.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, it is my job to lead on this government's approach, should that scenario happen. Preparing for Brexit is my department's driving mission. But while I am leading this turbocharged effort, the whole of government is committed to this endeavour.

Ministers across Whitehall are working together to ensure that every possibility is considered, every plan is scrutinised and every provision is made. A daily drumbeat of meetings means that we are holding departments accountable, so that preparations are completed on time.

The chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. And we have mobilised thecivil service, assigning 15,000 of our most talented civil servants to manage our exit from the EU.

We will make sure that on November 1, there is as little disruption to national life as possible. Our trade relationships will continue to thrive, thanks to agreements with countries around the world worth £70 billion. Our country will remain secure, thanks to nearly 1,000 new officers posted at our borders. And the 3.2 million EU nationals now living and working among us can remain confident, with absolute certainty, of their right to remain in the UK.

Above all, our goal is to be transparent. Soon, we will launch a public information campaign so that citizens, communities and businesses are ready and reassured about what will happen in the event of “no deal”.

In my first few weeks in this role, I have travelled to ports and tarmacs, borders and bridges, all across the UK –from the seaside of Dover to the rolling green hills of County Armagh. I have heard from business owners and border officials, farmers and hauliers. They are ready to put an end to uncertainty. And they are ready to embrace the opportunities ahead.

Our departure from the EU will be a once in a lifetime chance to chart a new course for the United Kingdom. Preparing for that new course will be a herculean effort. But this country has made astounding efforts before. We can do it again.
Rt Hon Michael Gove
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster